Author Topic: epg  (Read 11608 times)

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Re: epg
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2012, 22:40:18 pm »
latest photo of the epg, finally ready for testing

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Re: epg
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2012, 11:11:50 am »
Hi Dave,

What are you gonna put thru the EPG?
Water, HHO, or electrolysed water?
Do you have a scope to hook up to yr coils.

Steve

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Re: epg
« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2012, 16:23:11 pm »
Hi Steve,

I think I'm going to start out by feeding the gas from the gas gun. Ions is what I'm going for.
Yeah I have a pretty nice scope now that I will be testing with

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Re: epg
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2012, 18:20:24 pm »
Hi Steve,

I think I'm going to start out by feeding the gas from the gas gun. Ions is what I'm going for.
Yeah I have a pretty nice scope now that I will be testing with
Ha, good!

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Re: epg
« Reply #20 on: June 10, 2012, 21:27:59 pm »
I recommend to you a good read about magnetic confinement (bottle)... Somehow i'm almost thinking that meyer could have used a tokamak like design to inspire his epg construction. I found that in a tokamak they prevent the ionized fuel from touching the walls of the container simply creating a toroidal magnetic field mixed with a toro spiral magnetic field... than they apply the RF perpendicular to it so as to heat the fuel till fusion occurs...

This come from the fact that unbounded charges do not repel as strongly each other... so when you apply a magnetic field the charges goes to the axial center of the field, in the case of a toroid anywhere in the case of a solenoid at the center of the solenoid. just like would do a small permanent magnet. 

I'm pretty sure that meyer had non only electrical engineering background but also he knew everything about nuclear physics and also particle physics...

I'm going thru the hard way... i'm doing a course of physics and nuclear reactor engineering to know more about...

If the ions touch the copper they wouldn't neutralize stealing an electron from the copper?

So if there is only one kind of ion say positive into the epg...
In that case the all epg will become positively charged and it would explain why meyer used a big piece of plastic or glass i'm not sure whats that.. as the support for the epg...   

if we could make a kind of multipacting with the ions we could strip of the electrons from the atoms much easier... but as i pointed the container of the ionized gas will become charged... by induction or whatever...
« Last Edit: June 11, 2012, 20:53:02 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: epg
« Reply #21 on: June 10, 2012, 21:38:12 pm »
Sebs, I will read up on it. I think your right about the gas becoming neutral by sterling electrons from the copper tube. I think this will happen right after the ions discharge the photon energy. If our ions are positive could be not simply give the copper tube a positive charge? This way it would repel the ions

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Re: epg
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2012, 04:35:21 am »
Sebs, I looked into magnetic confinement. It's some awesome stuff, most of what I read was about those giant fusion reactors! I will read more but I have s pretty good idea why you turned me towards it : )
I was hoping you could clear some things up for me. For example, if we have a copper tube filled with positive ions and we wrap a coil around it and charge it, would the ions be attracted to the negative part of the coil. Electromagnets have both positive and negative sides right? Well unless it was dc? anyway, this seems like a very good thing to look into. I wish I would of designed my epg a bit differently but I guess I still can haha

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Re: epg
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2012, 16:06:24 pm »
Dave, i'm happy you looked into it, awesome stuff really.

Actually i don't understood what you mean by negative side of the coil, i guess what will happen is that the ions will align in the middle of the tube axial "without touching the walls like" and right in the position of equilibrium which is exactly the center of a solenoid or in a toroid anywhere inside the toroid..
thats because in a toroidal field there is no field "traveling outside" so there is no middle. I think it need to be DC for this but i'm not sure


This magnetic bottles are used to confine charged particles and even anti-matter.


I don't know why but i found a similarity with the EPG i thought with spheric magnets inside and an idea i had a long time ago, which i called the vibration transformer, would be an arrangement of 3 magnets two fixed at the sides repelling a center magnet as to make it free to move... Than the idea was to wind a primary and secondary coil around it and ad a capacitor in series with the primary and pulse it with low voltage... the idea was to drive it at the frequency of the harmonic mechanical oscillation of the magnets... I guessed at the time that it could possibly show some strange effects, but i wasn't able to construct it, with the knowledge i had. At least with this setup much could be learned from.

I meant this because there is an EPG where the gas don't need to flow inside...