Author Topic: My Meyer's Picture Collection for sale  (Read 9692 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Jr. member
  • *
  • Posts: 46
  • Jesus Christ is Lord! www.stansdream.com
    • Stan's Dream
Re: My Meyer's Picture Collection for sale
« Reply #32 on: May 05, 2011, 23:05:07 pm »
Mr. Don,

 Thanks again - I understand the layout now.
Undoubtedly this helps to get the maximum effect and interaction with the water.
The two studs are connected to the ends of the pipes?
I assume Stan used one of the slot areas to attach to the inner rod.
Thanks again for all the feedback. We are getting closer.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 99
Question for Dynodon
« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2011, 02:08:20 am »
Don
Here is a schematic update for the actual Gated Pulse Frequency Generator attached

Any idea on why Mr. Meyer added the 7404 inverters for the extra output signals and also why did he use a 4 input AND chip for an additional 2 outputs???

probably not required, but everything he did was for a good reason...although there were a lot of traces cut and errors on that board !



Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 363
Re: My Meyer's Picture Collection for sale
« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2011, 02:28:08 am »
I just figured that Stan may have wanted to have a couple of extra outputs for future use.There was alot of changes made to alot of the boards,probably trying to make it work correctly.
 
Remember Stan didn't make those boards,his brother Stephen did,he had an electronics business.
 
Don

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 99
Re: My Meyer's Picture Collection for sale
« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2011, 04:26:01 am »
I just figured that Stan may have wanted to have a couple of extra outputs for future use.There was alot of changes made to alot of the boards,probably trying to make it work correctly.
 
Remember Stan didn't make those boards,his brother Stephen did,he had an electronics business.
 
Don

Thanks for the response, i kind of figured that

ANY IDEA on what kinds of pump or pumps he used to pressurize those injectors and the ionized air from the gas processor?

obviously the air didnt flow into the mixing chamber by itself!

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 238
Re: My Meyer's Picture Collection for sale
« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2011, 18:35:07 pm »
There are 3 differential valves: One for ionized air, one for EGR, and the other is for filtered air from the filter housing.
 
A fitting below the throttle body provides engine vacuum, this is what pulls the different gasses into the engine through the differential solenoids (needle type valves).
 
It think the butterfly valve was also modified since water disassociation releases enough oxygen to provide a stoichiometric ratio. Stan states in the TB that the 2:1 stoichiometric ratio is maintained throughout the engines operating range.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 22:00:35 pm by HMS-776 »

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 99
Re: My Meyer's Picture Collection for sale
« Reply #37 on: May 14, 2011, 00:04:46 am »
There are 3 differential valves: One for ionized air, one for EGR, and the other is for filtered air from the filter housing.
 
A fitting below the throttle body provides engine vacuum, this is what pulls the different gasses into the engine through the differential solenoids (needle type valves).
 
It think the butterfly valve was also modified since water disassociation releases enough oxygen to provide a stoichiometric ratio. Stan states in the TB that the 2:1 stoichiometric ratio is maintained throughout the engines operating range.

Im referring to the 125 psi pump required to send the air, exhaust and water to the injector... the final embodiment of his design

apparently he mixed ionized air and exhaust gases with water mist in some sort of mixing chamber , then sent the entire mixture at 125 PSI to the injector to finalize the charging and firing of the mix.

at first he had a canadian patent where the three elments were sent to the injector via 3 different hoses and mixed in the injector...later he developed a better version where the mixing manifold was used before the fuel was sent to each injector

i can see how a 125 psi pump was required to get good flow based on injector solenoid pulse width.... there were 4 solenoids, one for each cylinder, and they obviously were controlled by the 4 LED s in the distributor... but how do you get the ambient (gas processor) ionized air into the mixing chamber ???

any ideas on the kind of pump used? or the configuration?