Author Topic: water polarizabilty  (Read 5564 times)

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water polarizabilty
« on: March 18, 2011, 10:32:22 am »
for those who understand technical stuff

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2011, 15:53:24 pm »
Thanks

gail3logan

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2011, 13:53:45 pm »
What basically is water polarizability? Can you explain?

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2011, 11:13:01 am »
polarizability to me basicaly means  what conditions needs to be met to become polarized.

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 10:22:56 am »
heres sum more useless knowledge i guess lol:
 
The polarizability is also frequency-dependent; we consider here the high-frequency (electronic) value and the low-frequency (static) limit.
The latter includes not only the response of the electrons to an applied field but also a vibrational contribution from the response of the
atoms in the molecule. For the mean electronic polarizability, we adopt the value 1.457(3)×10-30 m3, which Russell and Spackman [12] extracted
from refractive index data. For the vibrational contribution to the total polarizability in the low-frequency limit, we adopt the estimate of
Bishop and Cheung [13], which is 0.037×10-30 m3. The uncertainty in the vibrational contribution is probably on the order of ten percent [13].
For the mean total dipole polarizability (in the static limit), which is the sum of the electronic and vibrational effects, we therefore adopt
a value of 1.494(7)×10-30 m3.

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2011, 20:31:41 pm »
Well water is a dipole having a north and south.. So its like a needle in a compass.. It can be oriented  based on a field. In Stan's case That field being the voltage.. When stan gives the example of the microwave and how it warms food in one of his videos.. It is because the water molecule oscillates with the electromagnetic waves which in that case happens to be in the micro wavelength range of the spectrum (microwave).. I don't see why the molecules cant react to oscillations of lower spectrum.. 
Also in Stan's case he is not trying to oscillate the orientation of the molecules he was aligning them in one direction and stretching them.. The voltage field would lock them into a one way orientation.. as they stretched the hydrogen's would become further and further away from the oxygen until it reaches a threshold at which the oxygen would eject the hydrogen's electrons toward the Hydrogen's (opposite direction of positive plate)

this is what i have come to conclude based on my understanding

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2011, 10:44:13 am »
Im thinking the voltage field, with a tuned amplitude could restrain the motion or the frequency of the electrons of course but there is still and allways will  be motion or an oscilliation, with maybe in Stans case limited to the amplitude of the applied  tuned field.That applied field may have an effect similar to that of an applied magnetic field as to the electrons.A  tuned magnetic field can align the protons in the same dirrection or behave as in a resonance condition wich then are acceptable to abosrb energy.But when the magnectic field is released and protons align to an equilibrium state they emit energy.I think under an applied Voltage field the electrons behave as the protons do under a magnetic field and align themselves in the same dirrection wich are then acceptable to absorb energy.Under the stress of the voltage field the electrons motion may become lower in frequency and acceptable to absorb enuff energy to detach themselves looking for a host atom to attatch themsleves to become a more stable atom or molecule, because of the higher energy state from the absorbed energy under a resonance condition.To be polarized it seems may be a resonance condition as I see it. But this is just a thawt for me ...  havent got to play yet.

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Re: water polarizabilty
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2011, 16:08:03 pm »
The way I have come to look at it is ..
When 2 Hydrogen's and 1 Oxygen form the molecular covalent bond known as water.. Their is a change in domain for 2 electrons.. When i say domain I'm speaking of orbital domain (what the electron is orbiting)
They go from orbiting Hydrogen's to orbiting the Oxygen

This shift in orbital domain is a shift in electric field.. 

When them 2 electrons go into orbit with the Oxygen, the Oxygen goes from a 0 electrical charge to a -2 (From having 8 protons and 8 electrons, to having 8 protons and 10 electrons)..
The Hydrogen's go from a 0 electrical charge into a +1

This being said picture the oxygen atom as a -2 particle and the the Hydrogen's as positive 1. And think of the fact that charged particles can be physically influenced by a voltage.. I don't think we need to worry to much about orbital electrons and their oscillations (cycles around the nucleus) when it comes to breaking apart the water molecule..  We simply need to stretch the Hydrogen's away from the Oxygen.. As the Hydrogen's move away they will be pulling on the electrons still which will help elongate the orbit i would think..