Author Topic: Amp restriction Resistor  (Read 4840 times)

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Amp restriction Resistor
« on: February 20, 2011, 00:45:25 am »
Hello guys i think that we should keep it simple stupid as stan said.


Have you ever noticed that the tuned choke and the resistor had a wiper arm. Variable?


We can have 40kv supply supplying thru a diode and another power supply of voltage having also a diode in contrary direction connected from the wiper to the earth or contrary. The only thing is that it is in the contrary direction so as to match the voltage on the resistor and thus cancel out (cause its of reverse polarity and isolated by a diode) stoping the electrons or actually restricting the amp flow.


So you need two power supplies.

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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2011, 10:27:03 am »
To cancel eachother out, they must have the same frequency, is it?

Steve

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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2011, 13:08:50 pm »
I think so, but maybe with the resistor this could be done with just plain dc, or pulsed with the same frequency you pulse the transformer.


The important is that you block the electrons in the resistor.


I the water i think we can do basically the same thing, for example if we make the static positive voltage to be the negative electrode when electrons wants to flow from the negative to the positive they will be attracted by the electrode the are coming out of. The field will hold the electrons to a certain degree.


With the choke is the same i think but he might have matched the coupling inductance and resistance of the wire to obtain the right parameters. I think that if this is true he only made the coils to complicate and take everyone out of track. The important is that the VIC become a charge pump of current source, this way it has very high output impedance.


I think this is easy to picture, you apply positive and negative from two different supplies on each side of the resistor, if the voltage in the power supplies   are the same, no current will flow thru the resistor, only between the power supplies, this mean that we simply need to find the right ratio of resistances to allow to block the current so the vic can get high voltages.


I think that maybe no power will be dissipated on the resistor, or maybe just a little. I think that a 2,5ohm resistor would be enough, maybe applying 5v  2 amps we restrict the current.


Thing is we need to block the current so it can't leak into the power supply. I trying to understand how to do this, cause even diodes will not block i guess.


It might be a current source thus having very high impedance as to not allow the current from the 1° power supply to leak into the second.


I will work on this today and later i will show you some drawings.






Your question about the frequency also raised me a question like what if i pulse the resistor with a high frequency for having kind of impedance also created because the current is being interrupted or modulated at a high frequency,,,


Many many things to think about.


Tomorrow is the first day officially in the university.  = )

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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2011, 18:35:20 pm »
Analyzing the VIC of the patent the one in the toroidal core that has a ground connection, you see that the secondary diode and choke are connected in series and with fields aiding forming the charge pump, however in the other side of the secondary it is connected to the ground than to the opposing field coil. This mean that this choke will apply also a positive voltage field to the water. So both plates are positive in relation to ground however one is more positive than the other. So being also the negative electrode also positive it will restrict the amps flow by attracting the electrons to the electrode, so restricting its flow.


I still think that the ground would be the outside of the container. 


I'm still trying to find a way to combine on the resistor the effect of the amp restriction, but is hard to think how to completely eliminate the flow of the current thru the other source. Basically the current would stop in the resistor but would flow thru the source. I will keep on that.




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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2011, 00:38:23 am »
Makes a lot of sense for me to apply two positive fields of different voltages to create the flow of the electrons for causing restriction, cause the electrons in the wire would definitely go in opposite directions in the same wire. If a resonant condition must be find might be there in this restriction of the amps. 


Lets say the electrode 1 have 5kv in relation to ground and the electrode two have 4kv in relation to ground but still make part of the same circuit thus electrons will flow, however as both electrodes have positive voltage impressed into it, the electrons cannot leave the electrode witch is more negative, therefore water will restrict the amp flow. 


The thing is that maybe the sync vic is the way to go but from now paying attention on this.

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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2011, 00:55:21 am »
Wow now reanalyzing, with this in mind, i just found relation between the vic of the patent and the sync pulse vic.
From now if you think of the amp inhibitor coil as a reference voltage from ground so the high voltage is there in relation to the ground (outside of the container)
Than the chokes are wound not in opposing directions but fields aiding cause the floating high positive voltage will be on both electrodes. Therefore when you apply a voltage thru current pump or charge pump mechanism you are able to  charge the water cause you are restricting the amps by the action of the positive field.
So again charge the water very high positive voltage in relation to ground and apply high voltage with a charge pump mechanism.
With the altenator is easy than to see that he only used as a very crude pulse generator. And just provided high voltage to the cell from other source..
Seems very very clear for me now.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2011, 05:31:47 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2011, 01:02:31 am »
About the frequency doubling i think that might be related to somewhat the tuned choke, that shorted circuited section still takes my attention and i'm trying to determine why. My 1° thought is that as we are restricting the amps with the positive field, that somehow this will discharge in the vic forming the second pulse. I will be thinking about that.
Maybe there is a capacitor in parallel with the wiper forming a resonant tank so when the pulse terminates the capacitor discharge into the coil again thus forming the second, pulse. Like a resonant transformer.
Its very possible. And this might be a good reason for him to call it tuned choke.
If it is so than we have a good reason also for the word amp restriction too cause a parallel resonant tank have a high impedance.
So again basically the pulse will only be doubled at the right frequency.

« Last Edit: February 21, 2011, 05:31:26 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Amp restriction Resistor
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2011, 02:06:24 am »
In terms of operability, electrically flexing (Particle Oscillation) the combustible atoms of the water molecule as a "Energy Generator" by way of opposite voltage polarity is extremely economical since voltage is not consumed in an electronic circuit. Amp Inhibiting Circuit (970) of Figure (10-1) restricts/inhibits amp flow to a minimal level while elevating "Difference of Potential" to the highest possible level. The greater the "Difference of Potential"(in this case, electrical stress) the greater amount of work is performed ... thereby, being in compliance with the Laws of Physics since atoms are the source of all energy in our physical universe and atoms are directly responsive to / stimulated by external electrical forces.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2011, 02:39:30 am by sebosfato »