Author Topic: Resonant cavity sphere  (Read 7833 times)

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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2016, 02:05:24 am »
well i didnt seem to have read its only a pwm.. in this patent he makes clear that the negative outside shell and positive is the inner electrode... and in the case of the sphere the inner electrode has a much smaller radius...

i dont know the measures...

but if the distance is bigger than the radius the electric field there is much smaller than near the electrode.. this is said to be a electric field gradient...

in a capacitor there should be no diference in charge density at the plates but in this case as there is a big diference in radius (from the drawing) than the outer shell does not get as much as charge as the inner electrode... as the geomtry itself blocks the electric field before it reach the other electrode...

water is a good conductor of electric fields by its dielectric proprieties...although the reach of the electric field depends on the size of the field souce...


an electric field is defined in the real world (non electrostatic) by a current density and a ohmic media

such that for it to exist actually there must be some current flowing if its not in absolute vaccum ...



« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 02:37:21 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2016, 02:46:15 am »
http://dev.physicslab.org/Document.aspx?doctype=3&filename=Electrostatics_ElectricFieldsVoltage.xml

please check this link and click on the answers for the exercises questions...

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« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 03:30:24 am by KS »

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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2016, 14:20:50 pm »
the link i posted explain in detail the theory i had about the electric field from electric potential and geometry..


gaus law is nice.. but this use charge to calculate the voltage and vice versa.. so it allow to calculate not only the strenght but how it behave over distance from eletcrode..

those equations are the same i arrived...

but they explain more completely ...

hope you can understand....

it also have some curiosity about hydrogen atom. .

like the electric  potential of the electron orbit.... and so on (at the answers)


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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2016, 14:31:41 pm »


hope you can understand....



Not really.....

If the answer is 2.10 what does that mean?


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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2016, 00:39:06 am »
Point Charges
 
Check Your Answer    Use the formula for the electric field surrounding a point change to calculate an expression that would allow you to evaluate the electric potential (or voltage) at a given distance from the point charge.
    
    

Check Your Answer    How does the graph of E vs r for a charged spherical conductor of radius R compare to its graph of V vs r?
    Observe the properties of E vs r from the perspective of it being a gradient, or negative derivative of V vs r.
    
 
   
For a conducting sphere,
V = kQ/r   For a conducting sphere,
E = kQ/r2

Refer to the following information for the next five questions.

In a hydrogen atom, an electron (q = -e = -1.6 x 10-19 C) orbits a proton (q = +e = +1.6 x 10-19 C) at a radius of 0.53 x 10-10 meters.
EnviarCheck Your Answer    Considering the proton to be the central charge, what is the electric potential at the electron's orbital radius?
    27.2 volts

EnviarCheck Your Answer    How much electric potential energy does the electron have by virtual of its position in the proton's electric field?
    -4.35 x 10-18 J
    This question could have also been phrased as "how much electric potential energy is stored in a hydrogen atom?"

EnviarCheck Your Answer    How much kinetic energy does the electron have as it orbits the proton?
    2.17 x 10-18 J

EnviarCheck Your Answer    What is the electron's total energy?
    -2.18 x 10-18 J
    This energy is negative since the electron is trapped in the energy well of the atom. Recall that you the same scenario when you are working with satellites orbiting planets (link).

Check Your Answer    How much additional energy would the electron need to escape from its energy well - that is, to be ionized?
    +2.18 x 10-18 J

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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2016, 01:00:11 am »


hope you can understand....



Not really.....

If the answer is 2.10 what does that mean?

there you see they asking about the hydrogen atom that is a simplified version of course... but it gives an idea of how much electric field is required to pull apart the atom from its electron...

as you see the electron is at 27v potential in a hydrogen atom... this mean a photon with 27 electronvolts would be able to eject the only electron from it...

many molecules are easier to ionize than this...because their electron is shared... but physics can only calculate for simple atoms like hydrogen with one proton and one electron...

there is of course estimations and measured values...

electric force is equal to the charge times the electric field...

for example the force that the water molecule feel from the electrode is twice.. because it attracts a portion of it and repel another portion of the atoms inside the molecules,,

for example is possible to calculate from this the stretching of the molecule but trully if the molecule already have applied to it such a strong force it will already break apart..

water has a dielectric constant of 81 and this is because it is a polar molecule... is a polar solvent one of the best solvents available ... salt dissolves into water because water provide a way to it to break into split ions... this ions equidistantly distribute over the volume... a greater dielectric constant mean a better conduction of electric fields or that for the same charge the electric field between two point charges is 81 times smaller than vaccum

the same thing would happen if we were able to split the protons from electrons inside water... as water will reduce the electric field between them...
 

Meyer talk about increasing the oxygen negative charge and hydrogen positive charge... and that this makes the oxygen to repel the hydrogen covalent electrons switching the force that attract the atoms together.. .

he than say that the free floating atoms must regain its lost electrons to exit from the water bath as neutral molecules.. or so..

he also says that he apply the electric field 90 degrees before the current........ and this mean that it is restricted by a coil...

meyer say in the patent of the sphere capacitor that the greater the current thru water the greater will be the force too.. and that the ripling also cause a dynamic force..

by dynamic i think he mean electrodynamic when we get a changing electric field we get also a changing magnetic field.... 


Meyer talk abou slowing down the orbital spin of the electrons around their atoms to make it more eliptical

the teory will tell you what you need to do to accomplish the task.



« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 02:12:27 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Resonant cavity sphere
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2016, 03:53:02 am »
that 27.2 volts is simply the 2 electrons of a hydrogen gas molecule added together aint it?.....its not the same with the different ion species youre dealing with in your WFC.
If its a single hydrogen atom then you already know its 13.6 eV.....thats a distance.....i guess thats what youre getting at.....it takes 13.6 electron potential(eV) to be at a distance where there is no attraction.
The dynamic force of the rippling(oscillating) current is where the frequency needs to match the 1/4 wavelength or multiple of the cavity aint it? Or does it need to match a multiple of a wavelength of of those photons down yander...
There is a photon that matches both the oxygen and the proton in a really narrow bandwidth that might be worth a shot.........Im pretty sure it wasnt no whwere near 27eV tho.....i have that wrote down here somewhere if you want it :)

eh you may allready know this... here's what i have in some notes:
hydrogen : 397nM  INTENSITY =8
                                                } UV
oxygen:  397.3nM INTENSITY=450
O : 423.3 nM
H : 410.1 nM
H2O: 167nM
« Last Edit: May 12, 2016, 06:31:11 am by KS »