Author Topic: Stanley Modular Project  (Read 10504 times)

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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2011, 02:17:25 am »
Well I'm finishing the vic right now. I made Two resonant charging chokes with 24Awg wire having each one 240 turns being 80 of them in counter phase so the resulting inductance is 80 turns. And this resulting 80 turns inductance is cancelled by the same 80 turns resulting inductance of the other choke.


The secondary thus will be field aiding with one of the coils and therefore between this will go the diode. The other is connected to the negative side of the secondary.


I made in the first two groups of layers the resonant coils than on top of it the primary and on the top the secondary winding. For the primary i'm using the same 24Awg and will go for around 200turns. The core is pretty massive it has 1Kg.


I think that any non inductive resistor would be a good restricting amps choke. So as a non inductive choke. But i think that there must also be some net inductance so as to have accumulated energy to create a magnetic field that will restrict the amps on the non inductive section.


I made the resonant charging chokes with a tap on the point where the non inductive part start. So i can compare.


I'm using the laminated grain oriented electrical steel E I core for this vic. Its middle leg has 4cm wide and 6 high and the windows a have 2 cm x 6cm. EI core.


For the pulse shaping network i will use the flyback initially but i'm thinking that maybe is better to get more laminations like this and make another for transforming the pulse shape and the impedance properly.


I was thinking about this.


I you shoot the mosfet to the maximum of its conduction to drive a transformer, ok you get all the energy into the transformer with minimum switching losses, but you get low impedance regulation.


For example for using mosfets we need to provide a variable resistor that works like a voltage divided to allow it to restrict the amps in the primary to a certain degree, otherwise it is not working as it intend to work.


Meyer used bipolar transistors, good they are perfect for controlling current.


I'm saying all this cause to transfer maximum power to the water we need to have the right impedance on the signal going to the transformer, than the output of this pulse shaping transformer must match the input impedance of the vic witch must match the impedance of the water. 


I'm just having problems to decide how to calculate the impedance of the unipolar pulses I'm not sure. Maybe if the nucleus of the transformer don't go into saturation we could perfectly consider the doubled frequency, probably. At this point than maybe the gate is there to gate when the core reach the limit of saturation. If so we could use a Magnetic field sensor and connect to a comparator circuit to provide the gated signal at the right time. Thinking well this would be good to adjust the pulse duration to be able to not saturate the core or in a variety of ways.


If we think like that, than we should consider that the vic would be working in the kickback mode and that maybe a gap would be good for storing energy. The important is the material ability to fast collapse the magnetic field and not remaining permanently magnetized to avoid saturation. Seems that 1,7 tesla is the limit of the grain oriented. 


So If we have a water that has a resistance around 5000ohms And the secondary and chokes a certain impedance than we should meet this in the primary of the vic.


Would be important to completely understand the calculation of impedances in this VIC resonance. Otherwise what last is to make a good guess work and construct some
more different to try empirically.

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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2011, 02:23:40 am »
I have a feeling that I'm going to get there.


I'm starting to think that we should preset a frequency ad stay very close around it to be able to adjust the impedances otherwise for every different frequency we need different number of turns.


Here is a good reason to lose some power on the source. To make it very precise. Having a resistance in the source we have an impedance transformation in the transformer while restricting the power input limit. 


I'm used to never use not even one resistor in the power line...

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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2011, 10:05:43 am »
I was studying here about Positive feedback and an idea crossed my mind.


I from now believe that the resonant feedback circuit is nothing more than a circuit for controlling automatically the frequency in reference to the voltage applied in order to be able to limit the saturation of the core. When the magnetic field of the transformer reach the saturation the feedback coil will no longer experience change in flux so it by its threshold value will terminate the pulse sending the signal to the pll. This makes that when saturation is reached the pulse ends and is allowed to collapse aways with its maximum intensity and sequentially another unipolar pulse is applied to the primary of the vic. Than the gate is adjusted to the resonance of the water.


So if you change the supply voltage the frequency changes but the flux on the transformer aways remain at the maximum. If you change the impedance of the primary it will also change the frequency.


For example if you raise the voltage frequency will go up cause saturation will be reached more rapidly.


If you increase the impedance on the primary it will reduce the frequency to maintain the saturation to the desired level. 


The thing is we have to calculate the feedback signal parameter according to the max field in the transformer.


For example if the max field is 1,6 tesla, with 10 turns of wire we will have a certain voltage witch will be the trigger voltage to shut off the pulse. Thru a comparator this is easily obtained. 


The signal going to the pulse shaper might have to be divided by two. Cause we are duplicating the frequency in the pulse shape section.






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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #35 on: February 17, 2011, 07:28:09 am »
Guys i'm getting there.


Stan said that it works from 0 up to 10khz


I think that the PLL is tuned to aways match the impedance of the water. Varying the frequency as the impedance changes to adjust it and or the voltage.


It will be like a sweep in frequency.


The resonant scanning circuit matchs this sweep artificially until the cell get into operation therefore is important. The shape and frequency of this sweep might be also important. This will have the duration of the gated pulse trains.


Hope you understand what i'm talking about.


Maybe the resonant tank he use not very narrow band to achieve resonance in a frequency range of easier tune.


The impedance of the water will change during the pulsing operations. And this is not measurable i guess. thus the circuit must provide the adjustment.


Again for clarity the feed back signal for the pll is what transduce the impedance matching. We could use a dummy load for adjustments.


As the impedance of the water change or i mean its voltage, the reflected flux in the core will become weaker, so the transformer will not transmit the right impedance. So if we change the unipolar pulses frequency we can achieve that.


Might be much better approach to instead to vary only the input voltage instead of the frequency so the input impedance can be matched allowing for a high Q resonant circuit narrow band.




As the voltage of the load changes its impedance is changing over time. In the case of water witch is a capacitor maybe the sweep should be reverse, don't know why i thought of this, but maybe not.


The gate might be as small as 3hz i guess
 
The feedback measure the flux and stipulate a certain voltage witch it must operate this reduce the size of the pulse in the pll witch can be used reversely with a frequency to voltage converter to adjust the voltage!!! Very nice this.


I remember Scott Mckie power supply where he provide a way to charge a capacitor with constant current. Is pretty much the same i'm thinking.


Like to charge a capacitor over time you change the supply voltage over time. To charge it from 1 v to 2v 2 v are applied. The same thing as what happens in the resonance but in this case as you can vary the impedance you can apply the maximum power transfer aways than aways charging to the limit.


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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #36 on: February 17, 2011, 08:51:35 am »





Hello
I would like to take you all attention.


I found what could be happening in the amp restriction process.


First of all i'm going to tell you that when i said in the past charge pump, actually i was right cause the thing actually work like that but its called a current source.


A current source have infinite impedance thus does not matter the impedance of the source there will aways be that same current.


I recommend you all to read this article entirely
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Current_source


Here you see why in a dead short condition a constant current will still provide the same current even if voltage is 0.


And why a charge pump will aways charge a capacitor till its break down.


A van de graf is a charge pump too.

Now i'm going to introduce you the concept of the amp restriction.


Think of a resistor, if you ideally connected one current source (infinite impedance) to it a current will flow developing a voltage across its leads. Now if you apply a voltage source with counter "phase" polarity, you will have no current flowing thru the resistor therefore if you have infinite impedance across it a ideal current source and a ideal voltage source you can do create indefinite power. .


Meyer did this in the coil, in the water and in the air too.


I will explain.


The resonant charging choke combines a charge pump effect thus a constant current source, the resistor, and the voltage source.


Do you remember when meyer said that copper was better for voltage inducement. Well he was right.


If you take a coil of copper witch will have a certain current flowing thru it and you have another coil this made of resistive wire as for it will have a current flowing into it in one direction and a voltage being developed in the other direction.


The magnetic flux accomplishes both works.


There must be a resulting inductance as for it to behave as a charge pump. The amount of charge pumped depend on the voltage of the coil you designed. So the secondary charge the diode block and the coil give the extra charge.


I think that the coil can be made especially to control it perfectly i'm just thinking of that.


So again the current flowing thru the coil develop a voltage cross it, than you can simply apply a voltage to it or you can induce or whatever way we found that work well.


Very interesting?


So we can do in a variety of ways.








Ps:Steve because of the login i just wrote all this and that i'm going to write again now cause asked logging when i replied third time today...

« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 09:15:13 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2011, 08:54:11 am »
The proprieties of the wire are important. Right ratio of resistance to inductance.. . I think i will need to determine this empirically. Soon i will try to convince some one to help me to buy some multimeters, 3 would be enough being 1 clamp and a nice oscilloscope.  hehe




If you think well would be a nice construction. The resistive wire and the copper together. So as to be capacitively coupled and inductively.


The thing just do what he said it does we just didn't knew how was doing so we had no clue. But now!


I'm very exited with all this. Wish i could have some help here wounding coils...


Have a good day people around the world.


Ps: Steve I would like to ask you to forgive the banned members, even if they did wrong, in your conception, i think that we are researchers here and we can get over this problem fight that happened. I think they did wrong cause they could at least wait you to sell some dvds, i'm sure you were going to publish it to all soon. Anyway shittt happens and we must go ahead. I think that outlaw and tony have much to contribute here, commenting and experimenting. Even dankie might have gone thru many things i wish we could all talk about this. H20 power i think he is too hard head to come back but not the others. =) anyway is up to you i respect your decision and i will keep here with all others here discussing anyway.


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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #38 on: February 17, 2011, 13:40:50 pm »
Anyone a word?

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Re: Stanley Modular Project
« Reply #39 on: February 17, 2011, 16:14:12 pm »
Dankie is not banned anymore for half a year now and H2Opower left by him self.
Twoodside did not respond on any of my mails and Outlaw expressed certain feelings by email.
The sad story is that they also expressed their feelings on waterfuelcell.org about this forum and me.
Ionizationx is a free forum and everybody is welcome. But if people are f with me, then they better leave.
I know many of the admins of other forums and they act the same. Nothing new.
Of course its sad if talented people leave that way. I also know that some people react on a sad manner because they are dissapointed that their project wasnt succesfull.
My door is always open for a good conversation and i am not a person that stays angry. Costs too much energy... ;)

Steve