Author Topic: Embrittlement and wfc design  (Read 4975 times)

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Re: Embrittlement and wfc design
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2011, 18:54:55 pm »


"A word of caution is in order with series LC resonant circuits: because of the high currents which may be present in a series LC circuit at resonance, it is possible to produce dangerously high voltage drops across the capacitor and the inductor"



Please explain how or where there can be high voltage at resonance in a series LC circuit.

Maybe I can't comprehend it because of my preconceived notion that at resonance, a series LC circuit is
at it's lowest impedance.   

Lowest impedance=highest amperage=low voltage.

Itzon


That statement was done by a fellow researcher, I used that in this article that was written back in 2008 - so too be honest I do not remember why he wrote that. You can discard that all together. This article was written to highlight the electromotive force that bonds the atoms together (covalent bonding) and how it can be used as a potential field to do work. Also, google for the word Magnetrolysis and this should also give you more material to read about this specific event.
The fact that Meyer used voltage potential (which is similar to a magnetic field) was proven back in the mid 40's - read article here.
For any other electrical question, I think that more educated members can jump in, I am still learning  ::)


http://www.rexresearch.com/ehrenhaf/ehrenhaf.htm

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Re: Embrittlement and wfc design
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2011, 18:58:32 pm »
in series resonance the voltage drops to that of the supply voltage across both the L and C, but you still have huge voltages across the L and C, which are out of phase, so they cancel out to give you the supply voltage across both of them


how do you move a massive amount of current? you need a large voltage, but voltage is measured from point to point, so you have to take into account exactly where you measure the voltage, and what is happening in between those points


impedance is lowest because the inductive reactance and capacitive reactance are equal and opposite - NOT because they are both zero... they are both large.

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Re: Embrittlement and wfc design
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2011, 20:53:54 pm »

impedance is lowest because the inductive reactance and capacitive reactance are equal and opposite - NOT because they are both zero... they are both large.

Thanks for that post Donaldwfc.

While I never thought the impedance would be zero at resonance, I did not think about aiming for reactances of a large resistance. 

I would think the circuit would have to have a fairly sharp Q for this, and I'm not so sure a water cap is capable, but I can't say that with any degree of certainty...at least not yet.

Hmmm....something else to ponder on.

Itzon