Author Topic: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.  (Read 17497 times)

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2010, 22:48:05 pm »
Dan Danforth's circuit has been around for a long time. Has anybody been able to replicate it?

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2010, 22:59:27 pm »
It's not a good design. Would be much better to replicate the JLN circuit. Or even better build a simple system using a micro-controller to auto tune the circuit. Preferably one with at least 2 PWM outputs that can be run at independent frequencies. Transformer is a simple off the shelf pulse transformer 12/220 or so. I have a couple of these laying around. The processors I am using are already coded for auto sweeping of frequencies so that part is already done. Ferrite rod is simple with two coils, one wrapped opposite of the other to cancel flux.

If you guys want to try it I can help. I am in the middle of two circuits that must be done by this weekend, and then they will need to be tested before the end of September is up so I am out until then.

Tad

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2010, 23:40:00 pm »
Hey Tad, keep checking back to the forums every few weeks or months, I might have some questions for you at some point :)

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2010, 00:20:12 am »
Sure thing  ;)

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2010, 01:01:27 am »
Hello


I believe that this guy really have succeed, because i'm believing that stan solution was quite simple...


I made a diagram of this schematic, with a better visualization for better understanding what he did exactly.. here it is




This is the page 19 where are the others?


i'm thinking that the unipolar pulses applied to the primary is one of the main principles behind stan work, is not very hard to make it


i have analyzed very well the behavior of the currents and made this other drawings ...


Basically when the unipolar field collapses a very ultra fast pulse is generated, if connected this way you should be able to apply this pulse to the water thru the other inductor that shares the same coupling field...









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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2010, 01:23:40 am »
Anytime Steve. Tell me if you need any help.

@Sebosfato

Yeah, the Danforth stuff is ok, it's just alot more complex than it needs to be. It also has some areas that could fail based on transients.

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2010, 11:01:39 am »
yes, it is a bit complicated at a first look but i think that i'm starting to understand what he did...


he created a kind of current sensing that generates the resonant feedback, thats why he uses the neutral to supply the 555 timer.. the 555 is there for generating an arbitrary frequency but being able to sense and lock in automatically into resonance...


you see a * in his drawing here he show something like 60w 22-5ohm, i believe it is where the cell is connected... (between the transistors) i didn't understood the Rx yet and how exactly the second coil is connected .


seems to me like a successful replication


he used two coils of 200 turns divided in 5 layers of 40 turns for each coil. (section A and section B)


However i already have my own circuit and schematic for the vic witch i'm going to use to test what i'm saying.


Did you guys understood the unipolar pulse thing that i mentioned? When every unipolar pulse collapses, a very high speed pulse is generated and as the pulse is very fast the voltage of the spike will be huge...  ( a ultra high speed diode will be needed in order to be able to bring this pulse to the water...


In my drawing in blue you see the first pulse and its current flow and in black you see the off pulse and its current flow...


i made a representation of the ions electrons path into the circuit witch is the arrow followed by the black point...


I also represented the spike as a black point representing the collapses of the field... This spike is what will dissociate the water, so the higher the frequency the more spikes you get...


I'm thinking that this way no switching device will be needed as the diodes will be able to open or close automatically during pulsing operations


I BELIEVE






 

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Re: Dan Danforth replication of Stan Meyer's work, after a meeting with Stan.
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2010, 17:58:26 pm »
Guys i discovered meyer secret.
Its all about charging the inductor with one frequency and discharge with other.


Example


1 joule = 1 watt / second


If you charge the inductor with one watt in one second and than discharge this inductor in 1 nano second you are creating a 1 Giga joule discharge.


The secret is the collapse of the field as i explained in the last post.


again
The pulse that charge the transformer is at one frequency but have a 99,99% duty cycle... thus the discharge occurs in 0,01% of the period thus it is about 10000 times smaller...


than voltage perform work


I will end here and let you take your conclusions.