Author Topic: Bifilar coils  (Read 6496 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4441
    • water structure and science
Bifilar coils
« on: September 06, 2010, 14:18:43 pm »
Hi,
 
Just found a simple proof of a better working coil because of the bifilar concept.:
 
 
This easy experiment demonstrates the extra power in Nikola Tesla's patent for electromagnets.
 Things you'll need:     
  • 2 - 16 penny nails   
  • about 3 feet of magnet wire - (20 to 28 gage)   
  • 1 - D Cell battery   
  • 4 - Paper Clips
  • Wind the first nail with 100 turns of magnet wire.  Leave about 3 inches of wire on both ends of the winding.
    Wind the second nail with 100 turns of magnet wire, but in the following way.  Cut two equal length wires about 12" long each.  Holding the two wires together, begin turning 50 parallel turns of magnet wire around the nail.  When you have finished winding the coil trim off the excess wire so that there are 3" of wire on both ends of the coil.  Take the two inside leads from each end and twist them together.  Remember to clean the ends of the magnet wire so they can make an electrical connection.
    This is what they should look like: (click on the image for a closer view)    Two Electromagnets
    Now connect the battery to the end leads of the single wound nail.  This will energize the coil and cause the nail to become magnetic.  Now pick up as many paper clips with the nail as you can.
    OK, connect the battery to the ends of the bifilar wound coil.  Now pick up as many paper clips as you can with this electromagnet.
    The same amount of voltage, from the same battery, produces twice as much energy in the bifilar wound coil as in the single wound coil.  This is just one of the many techniques Nikola Tesla used to make his inventions highly efficient.
     
     

    Offline Login to see usernames

    • Global Moderator
    • Hero member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3607
    Re: Bifilar coils
    « Reply #1 on: October 03, 2010, 15:12:12 pm »
    Hello steve
     
    Do you remember that youtube video with a kind of iron U  I  core with two coils, witch the guy energize and than become a permanent magnet and witch when he pull out the I part of the core the electricity was discharged and the lamp lights? Do you have any info about that principle and the link to that video please? I'm looking for it since some time and not finding...


    Thanks


    ps do you remember the my proposed resonant circuit with one coil 2 diodes two tubes?
    now get the dan's circuit substitute the other capacitor by another tube and take out the transistor and drive with my circuit, using distilled water...


    isn't the same circuit? forget about my modification on the last drawing , even if is not wrong it would only be needed if you want to run with only one tube.. but a little different than what i showed...


    also forget about the cap in series with the tubes in my circuit...




    and


    have you ever read this?
    Frequency dependent capacitorsIf a capacitor is driven with a time-varying voltage that changes rapidly enough, then the polarization of the dielectric cannot follow the signal. As an example of the origin of this mechanism, the internal microscopic dipoles contributing to the dielectric constant cannot move instantly, and so as frequency of an applied alternating voltage increases, the dipole response is limited and the dielectric constant diminishes. A changing dielectric constant with frequency is referred to as dielectric dispersion, and is governed by dielectric relaxation processes, such as Debye relaxation. Under transient conditions, the displacement field can be expressed as (see electric susceptibility):indicating the lag in response by the time dependence of ?r, calculated in principle from an underlying microscopic analysis, for example, of the dipole behavior in the dielectric. See, for example, linear response function.[6][7] The integral extends over the entire past history up to the present time. A Fourier transform in time then results in:where ?r(?) is now a complex function, with an imaginary part related to absorption of energy from the field by the medium. See permittivity. The capacitance, being proportional to the dielectric constant, also exhibits this frequency behavior. Fourier transforming Gauss's law with this form for displacement field:where j is the imaginary unit, V(?) is the voltage component at angular frequency ?, G(?) is the real part of the current, called the conductance, and C(?) determines the imaginary part of the current and is the capacitance. Z(?) is the complex impedance.
    When a parallel-plate capacitor is filled with a dielectric, the measurement of dielectric properties of the medium is based upon the relation:where a single prime denotes the real part and a double prime the imaginary part, Z(?) is the complex impedance with the dielectric present, C(?) is the so-called complex capacitance with the dielectric present, and C0 is the capacitance without the dielectric.
    [8][9] (Measurement "without the dielectric" in principle means measurement in free space, an unattainable goal inasmuch as even the quantum vacuum is predicted to exhibit nonideal behavior, such as dichroism. For practical purposes, when measurement errors are taken into account, often a measurement in terrestrial vacuum, or simply a calculation of C0, is sufficiently accurate.[10] )
    Using this measurement method, the dielectric constant may exhibit a
    resonance at certain frequencies corresponding to characteristic response frequencies (excitation energies) of contributors to the dielectric constant. These resonances are the basis for a number of experimental techniques for detecting defects. The conductance method measures absorption as a function of frequency.[11] Alternatively, the time response of the capacitance can be used directly, as in deep-level transient spectroscopy.
    [12]
    Another example of frequency dependent capacitance occurs with
    MOS capacitors, where the slow generation of minority carriers means that at high frequencies the capacitance measures only the majority carrier response, while at low frequencies both types of carrier respond.[13][14]
    At optical frequencies, in semiconductors the dielectric constant exhibits structure related to the band structure of the solid. Sophisticated
    modulation spectroscopy measurement methods based upon modulating the crystal structure by pressure or by other stresses and observing the related changes in absorption or reflection of light have advanced our knowledge of these materials.[15]

    Online Login to see usernames

    • Administrator
    • Hero member
    • ****
    • Posts: 4441
      • water structure and science
    Re: Bifilar coils
    « Reply #2 on: October 03, 2010, 16:49:17 pm »
    Hello steve
     
    Do you remember that youtube video with a kind of iron U  I  core with two coils, witch the guy energize and than become a permanent magnet and witch when he pull out the I part of the core the electricity was discharged and the lamp lights? Do you have any info about that principle and the link to that video please? I'm looking for it since some time and not finding...


    Thanks


    ps do you remember the my proposed resonant circuit with one coil 2 diodes two tubes?
    now get the dan's circuit substitute the other capacitor by another tube and take out the transistor and drive with my circuit, using distilled water...


    isn't the same circuit? forget about my modification on the last drawing , even if is not wrong it would only be needed if you want to run with only one tube.. but a little different than what i showed...


    also forget about the cap in series with the tubes in my circuit...




    and


    have you ever read this?
    Frequency dependent capacitorsIf a capacitor is driven with a time-varying voltage that changes rapidly enough, then the polarization of the dielectric cannot follow the signal. As an example of the origin of this mechanism, the internal microscopic dipoles contributing to the dielectric constant cannot move instantly, and so as frequency of an applied alternating voltage increases, the dipole response is limited and the dielectric constant diminishes. A changing dielectric constant with frequency is referred to as dielectric dispersion, and is governed by dielectric relaxation processes, such as Debye relaxation. Under transient conditions, the displacement field can be expressed as (see electric susceptibility):indicating the lag in response by the time dependence of ?r, calculated in principle from an underlying microscopic analysis, for example, of the dipole behavior in the dielectric. See, for example, linear response function.[6][7] The integral extends over the entire past history up to the present time. A Fourier transform in time then results in:where ?r(?) is now a complex function, with an imaginary part related to absorption of energy from the field by the medium. See permittivity. The capacitance, being proportional to the dielectric constant, also exhibits this frequency behavior. Fourier transforming Gauss's law with this form for displacement field:where j is the imaginary unit, V(?) is the voltage component at angular frequency ?, G(?) is the real part of the current, called the conductance, and C(?) determines the imaginary part of the current and is the capacitance. Z(?) is the complex impedance.
    When a parallel-plate capacitor is filled with a dielectric, the measurement of dielectric properties of the medium is based upon the relation:where a single prime denotes the real part and a double prime the imaginary part, Z(?) is the complex impedance with the dielectric present, C(?) is the so-called complex capacitance with the dielectric present, and C0 is the capacitance without the dielectric.
    [8][9] (Measurement "without the dielectric" in principle means measurement in free space, an unattainable goal inasmuch as even the quantum vacuum is predicted to exhibit nonideal behavior, such as dichroism. For practical purposes, when measurement errors are taken into account, often a measurement in terrestrial vacuum, or simply a calculation of C0, is sufficiently accurate.[10] )
    Using this measurement method, the dielectric constant may exhibit a
    resonance at certain frequencies corresponding to characteristic response frequencies (excitation energies) of contributors to the dielectric constant. These resonances are the basis for a number of experimental techniques for detecting defects. The conductance method measures absorption as a function of frequency.[11] Alternatively, the time response of the capacitance can be used directly, as in deep-level transient spectroscopy.
    [12]
    Another example of frequency dependent capacitance occurs with
    MOS capacitors, where the slow generation of minority carriers means that at high frequencies the capacitance measures only the majority carrier response, while at low frequencies both types of carrier respond.[13][14]
    At optical frequencies, in semiconductors the dielectric constant exhibits structure related to the band structure of the solid. Sophisticated
    modulation spectroscopy measurement methods based upon modulating the crystal structure by pressure or by other stresses and observing the related changes in absorption or reflection of light have advanced our knowledge of these materials.[15]

    That dude was showing bemf.....i remember. Sadly i dont have the links....

    Of course is your circuit and Dans circuit similar with the exception of the 2 tubes and 2 diodes from you. Dan has a giant coil to create a massive spike of at least 1500v.
    He first charge the water up with amps.
    Amps create a path for the charge. Then the spike hits and does something...so it seems...






    Offline Login to see usernames

    • Global Moderator
    • Hero member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3607
    Re: Bifilar coils
    « Reply #3 on: October 03, 2010, 18:21:19 pm »
    I meant this, (see the drawing)  he is doing the same thing as i was but he is not using a high voltage transformer he is inputing current in series, (i did this too and worked last year)  he created a recirculating resonant tank, like the one i had but at that time i could not find distilled water and didn't found it would work because i was not thinking about high voltage across the tubes anymore... The only difference is that he substitute one of the tube by a capacitor and use the transistor inside the tank, to be able to insert the current without a transformer... i discovered in my resonant tank that was not necessary if you drive it with high voltage low amp in parallel using only two diodes... Stan made the vic as to double the frequency because of this... to drive the resonance better.. I remember last year i also got this same effects except that i didn't had pure distilled water, and for that reason i added soda and a capacitor in series to make the capacitance part of the resonance.. .
    It becomes a resonant cavity witch have a recirculating current and aways dc alternating between the two tubes.  With the double coil is possible to make with only one tube i think, i didn't thought of it yet.-.. just finishing remaking my cell with two tubes again and the coil to drive it to resonance..  You can see it on my youtube channel


    )=)))