Author Topic: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell  (Read 35007 times)

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #64 on: February 22, 2011, 15:30:22 pm »
Yes, I think your right. But the intention was to eliminate flash back right?




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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #65 on: February 22, 2011, 15:39:52 pm »
Yes,to eliminate flashback by slowing down the burn speed of the hydrogen,by slowing down the the linking up of the hydrogen and oxygen molecules because of the non combustible gasses getting in between them.
Don

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #66 on: February 24, 2011, 03:52:45 am »
@Dynodon:
Thank you for the doweling hole size.   Now that I know they are 1/8”, locating the plastic doweling shouldn’t be that hard.  You have really helped out quite a bit.  Thanks again for your input.

@Everyone:
I just picked up my cell caps today and the 6” O.D. x .75” deep grooves came out very clean.  I’ve attached some pictures of the caps and the cell put together. 
 
I cut the all-thread columns a little long to double as legs for the cell to stand on to afford clearance for the electrical posts.  I need to find some rubber caps to put on the bottom of the legs.
 
Regards,
mina

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #67 on: February 24, 2011, 05:37:30 am »
you better get a solid base on that to prevent tipping!


also from an aesthetic perspective, i think threaded rod looks bad (personal opinion) for a little more cost and effort you could get some solid aluminum rods and have the machinist thread the ends, or drill holes in the ends and tap them so you can use bolts into the aluminum rod, then these will look nicer, with even more effort, they can be sanded and polished to a mirror finish, which doesn't take long with a lathe and a range of sandpaper up to 2000 grit, maybe something to consider some months down the road when you have it working great and want to start showing people, of course :)


personally i went with a large SS rod right through the center of the cell, so i don't have any rods on the outside, Stans looks the nicest with the ends bolted to the acrylic tube, but the 3/8 thick tubes are big money


nice work

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #68 on: February 25, 2011, 01:30:15 am »
@Donaldwfc:
You are correct about the solid rod as opposed to the all-thread.  The solid rod with threaded ends look very professional and I will be changing my all-thread out to stainless steel rods later on.  Now that I have the length of the columns established, it will be a cinch to cut the solid rods to the correct length.
 
A base is also another excellent suggestion to improve the cell (and keep it upright) so I’ll be adding one shortly.  I’m thinking now about going with possibly a plastic base about 12” x 12”.
 
@Everyone:
I just bought some more material and when it arrives, I’ll add it to the parts list thread in my projects section. 
 
Another big THANK YOU to everyone who has been contributing to this thread.  I could NOT have gotten this far without you as this has been a continual learning experience for me.   
 
Regards,
mina

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #69 on: February 26, 2011, 23:46:40 pm »
One frame from a video that Stan’s wife shot of the first time Stan successfully ran the dune buggy on water (via the demo cell sitting on the ground behind the vehicle). 

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #70 on: February 27, 2011, 00:37:16 am »
I see the same as you.

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Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2
« Reply #71 on: February 27, 2011, 03:04:44 am »
@Everyone:
I will repost this little disclaimer (as I did back in reply #19)
 
Here are some of the theories I have formed concerning Stanley Meyer’s earlier stages of development.  Keep in mind that these theories may or may not reflect what actually took place.

Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2:
 
Meyer claims to have built his demo cell in his own lab/garage.  After getting the cell to produce phenomenal amounts of hydroxy gas, he connects the cell to his now famous dune buggy and removes the gas tank. 
 
His dune buggy had a carbureted engine and made it easier for him to run (idle) the engine off the demo cell.  The last photo I posted in my previous reply (reply #69) is a frame I extracted from his first video of the dune buggy actually running (idling) on water.  It appears that Stan originally took everything that was on his lab/shop bench and mounted it on the rear of the dune buggy.
 
The cell only produced enough gas to idle the dune buggy engine so he would add additional cells together to make one large one to mount on the back of the vehicle.  He simply moved the alternator, electric AC motor (which drove the alternator), and a larger scale tubular array from the lab to the back of the dune buggy. 
 
He also mounted the variable AC transformer in a larger electrical enclosure and groups of 9 sets of tubes were represented by their own column of toggle switches which were also mounted on the giant electrical enclosure vertically.  There were 5 vertical columns of 9 toggle switches so there were a total of 5 sets of 9 tubes needed (or five demo cells put together) to run the engine at full throttle.  They were all powered by one alternator which was driven by a 120VAC capacitor start motor.
 
(TO BE CONTINUED)
« Last Edit: March 03, 2011, 02:26:11 am by mina »