Author Topic: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields  (Read 25992 times)

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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2010, 13:08:55 pm »
Sebos,

The test i ran here, showed NOT 1 voltage rimple whatsoever.
I used a strong magnet around my HHO output and on the same hose, i had multiple coils.
I pulsed the gas, etc etc.
Again, not 1 rimple.

So, if the option is to ionize gas, because that state can be magnetized, then my test would have shown some rimples too.
The gas from a WFC has always some ionized atoms in it, as far as my theory knowledge goes.

I prever to think that Stan might have used the gas and put that thru a magnetic liquid, like Ferrofluid. If you charge the ferrofluid with a magnet and make it move by use of the gasflow, then you have a moving flux and your coils will detect current.

Just my 2 cents for the moment.
Lets all keep looking into this, because it makes a lot of sense!

Steve







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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2010, 14:34:24 pm »
Yes the ferro fluid moved by the bubbles is very much simpler i guess, and i think is easier to replicate too. I was trying to guess what meyer was doing if using only with the gas.

I though about another possibility.

Maybe we could use the photoelectric effect to gain energy and to have a better ionized gas inside the tube. By having a sodium electrode illuminated  by a lasers about 400nm. This would give us some oxygen very ionized. I think.

did you tried the plastic tube thing man?

Have you seeing a vortex electrolysis when in presence of magnetic field?

Maybe with the resonant tank we can have enough high voltage to ionize the gases, just guessing again...

I was thinking about The resonant cell meyer used, he had the tubes isolated from each other.

In your design you might have some losses, some ac passing thru the tubes. Because they are not isolated from each other. What do you think about?

Maybe you could try to have one resonance for each individual pairs of tubes, what do you think about? I was trying to think about and thought that meyer used 11 vics so maybe he had different resonance for each tube. I will Still thinking about.

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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2010, 15:13:30 pm »
steve,
gases coming out of the cell are still neutral having no field until they go through the hydrogen fracturing.. after hydrogen fracturing  the gas will be electron deficient and will have a positive vacuum field... its the same idea as the epg but it relies on energy from the vacuum to generate current (the highly unstable gas...

seb,
im still thinking about what u were saying about maintaining a constant fuel pressure while just regulating the non combustable and ionized ambient air.... im gonna have to disagree at the moment because in stans video when he first starts running the buggy he specifically states that in order to increase rpms all one must do is vary the voltage being applied to the cell.. so i would say voltage variates acelleration due to increases of quantity and pressure..

Quote
Maybe you could try to have one resonance for each individual pairs of tubes, what do you think about? I was trying to think about and thought that meyer used 11 vics so maybe he had different resonance for each tube. I will Still thinking about.

stan had 10 tubes cells hooked up as dynodon said.. it has 11 holes but one was not active.. each tube had its own vic and each tube had its own pll circuit (resonant tuner)  they have to because as stan mentions that resonant varies during gas production do to the gases exhisting in the gap... there is no way that each tube will be changing there dielectric resistance equally simotaniously.. each tube will experience its own distinct variablity during production..... that when it comes to resonant tube cells.. the rotary version going to multiple tubes doesnt appear to have that capability so i would say that may be one major distinction between a resonant cavitiy and the rotary vic

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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2010, 15:30:26 pm »
Hi,

Its a challange to find out what or which components Stan used in his device.
Maybe Don can add something here?

Here are some links on ferrofluids:
http://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2009-09/making-ferrofluids-work-you
http://www.supermagnete.nl/eng/FER-01

You can make it yourself. Thats much cheaper.

Sebos,

My resonant circuit has been setup with 5 tubes of the 10 tubes in parallel.
5 for each direction.
I also tried single tube setup, like you have.
My theory is correct that more tubes in parallel will lower total resistance and that way, more current will be consumed (leaked) in the circuit.

Steve




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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2010, 15:47:57 pm »
http://www.physlink.com/Education/askexperts/ae493.cfm


Question

Why is liquid oxygen magnetic?

Asked by: Mitchell

Answer

Actually it is not magnetic but paramagnetic. That is that it is attracted by the magnetic field but does not remain magnetic once it leaves the field. Gaseous oxygen is paramagnetic also but is moving too fast to be affected by the magnets. The reason that it is paramagnetic is because the oxygen molecule has two unpaired electrons. Electrons not only go around the atom in their orbitals, they also spin, which creates a magnetic field. Unpaired electrons spin in the same direction as each other, which increases the magnetic field effect. When the electron in an orbital become paired with another electron in that orbital, the new electron spins in the opposite direction and this cancels the effect of the first electron. Note that according to Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion theory (VSEPR), O2 has no unpaired electrons but according to Molecular Orbital (MO) theory it does have unpaired electrons. Since liquid O2 does stick to a magnet, MO theory is better at explaining the behavior.

Answered by: Mark Lockhart, B.S., High School Chemistry Teacher


Firstly, let us define the properties of the oxygen we'll be talking about. O2 has, in total, 12 valence electrons (each oxygen donating six).

For something to be magnetic (we say 'paramagnetic'), it must have an inequality in the total electron spin. The quantum number ms represents the magnetic spin of an electron. It can have values of 1/2 or -1/2, and is an important number when dealing with bonding and the Pauli exclusion principle. When an atom or molecule has an equal number of 1/2 and -1/2 spins such that they cancel each other out, it is not magnetic (we say 'diamagnetic'), and this can be determined from how the different electron shells are 'filled up' by the electrons.

The VSEPR & Valence Bond theories do not explain O2's magnetic nature. However, experiment reveals it most certainly is! Molecular Orbital Theory (MO Theory) is needed to understand how O2 is magnetic. Teaching the basics of MO Theory would take far more time than can be devoted here, so I'll supply a link or two at the bottom for anyone who wants to learn more. :)

Anyway, the valence electrons fill the molecular orbitals in much the same fashion as in other bond theories, and the Exclusion Principle still holds, but these orbitals have different names. The order in which O2 will fill the orbitals is:

sigma2s, sigma2s*, sigma2p, sigma2p*

Two electrons can occupy each s orbital, while 6 electrons can occupy each p orbital. Following the Exclusion Principle, two electrons will fill both the 2s and 2s* orbitals, 6 electrons will fill the 2p orbital, and that leaves 2 electrons to fill the 2p* orbital. These two electrons will only partially fill this orbital, and will have parallel spins. Since the rest of the electrons are all paired, the remaining two electrons in the 2p* orbital give the diatomic molecule a net total spin (it does not matter if they are 1/2 or -1/2 spins, they will both be the same). Since there is a net spin, O2 is paramagnetic.

Since this isn't really the place to learn MO Theory, if you wish to learn more, see the following site:

Molecular Orbital Theory
by Purdue

Answered by: Philip Johnson, Physics Undergrad, Memorial University

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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2010, 16:13:31 pm »
The fun thing about the last article, is that it confirms Stan Meyer technology.

So, maybe ionization is the next step. That should make the HHO paramagnetic, so to speak. Then test and see if we get a voltage rimple of a coil.

Hmmmm.
Back to my roots...ionization

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubly_ionized_oxygen
http://www.physics.uq.edu.au/people/ross/phys2080/ael/saha.htm
http://www.physicsforums.com/archive/index.php/t-336089.html
http://www.scienceclarified.com/Io-Ma/Ionization.html

Steve

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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2010, 16:25:29 pm »
Steve this explain why ionized gas would have a magnetic field. thanks a lot. Probably using magnetic electrodes to generate the gas we can also have parahydrogen as we were talking about the other day...

have you seeing this ? http://www.rexresearch.com/ehrenhaf/ehrenhaf.htm

About the cell, I think stan isolated his tubes that way in the resonant cell as to not have Ac current leaking thru the cell before the diode if you understand what i mean. Think about... For sure as the area of the cells are greater the resistance will be lower and efficiency will grow up. So loss less high voltage capacitors and thick wire to reduce losses in the tank and you should see more efficiency. Maybe thats why you had more than 1,4 volts between the cells ? ??

outlawstc i'm just considering the cell must operate at a maximum pressure or at least have a limit.
and that air mixed with the gas would give higher rpm than exhaust mixed with it. I was just considering a an acceleration differential or incentive. Off course as the rpm goes higher or you need more power you need to apply more power too. Is the same as gasoline at high rpm will consume more theoretically because on a motor losses increases for each cycle right!
 




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Re: Generation of electricity by usage of moving magnetic fields
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2010, 16:30:11 pm »
Ionization energy
Electrons in an atom are attracted to the atomic nucleus by electrical forces. An electron is negatively charged; the nucleus is positively charged. Since opposite charges attract each other, an electron tends to stay with its atomic nucleus.

In order to remove an electron from an atom, then, energy must be provided to overcome the force of attraction of the nucleus. That energy is called ionization energy.

The energy needed to remove an electron differs from atom to atom. Consider the difference between hydrogen and sodium. Hydrogen has only one electron, located fairly close to its nucleus. A good deal of energy is needed to overcome the attraction of the hydrogen nucleus for its electron. Sodium has 11 electrons, one of which is at a relatively great distance from the nucleus. The force of attraction by the nucleus for that outermost electron is small, compared to the force in a hydrogen atom. The outermost sodium electron can be removed with a relatively small amount of energy.

This comparison can be confirmed by looking at the first ionization energy for both hydrogen and sodium. The first ionization energy is the amount of energy required to remove the first electron from an atom. For hydrogen, that number is 1,312 kilojoules per mole, and for sodium it is 495.9 kilojoules per mole. (A mole is a unit used to represent a certain number of particles, usually atoms or molecules.)


Read more: Ionization - body, used, water, process, energy, oxygen, substance, change, Ionization energy http://www.scienceclarified.com/Io-Ma/Ionization.html#ixzz0e6tmbLYz