Author Topic: Resonance WFC  (Read 47926 times)

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #96 on: August 13, 2011, 14:06:46 pm »
Very nice!! is it tuning into resonance properly?
Not yet, I have a few issues with the TIP driver to solve.

Br,
Webmug

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #97 on: August 13, 2011, 16:39:43 pm »
Looks great, Webmug!

Looking forward to some testresults   ;)

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #98 on: August 13, 2011, 18:08:39 pm »
do you think .028" is close enough? That is what I went with.
Dave,

There is not too much differences between .030"and .028" wall thickness.
(0.030 - 0.028) * inch = 0.0508 millimeters!  :-X
For a standard tube it could be a thickness measurement fault don't you think?
I think the resonance of this cell should not differ too much with .028" wall thickness, we will see...

Br,
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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #99 on: August 13, 2011, 18:32:46 pm »
@Steve, that's exactly what I was thinking  :)

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #100 on: August 17, 2011, 07:16:10 am »
Looks good!,
Just some questions,
If you are using resonance i am assuming you will be resonating for voltage...


Whats your operational voltage expected? also have you calculated in kickback from your cycles? Would hate to see all that work fried because you had more than your calculated voltage come back through the transformer...

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #101 on: August 19, 2011, 14:02:26 pm »
hey webmug, right on, this is where stans famous statement, restrict the amps and allow voltage to take over, comes into play, with amps flowing through the water the voltage can not grab onto the water and oscillate it, first amps must be completely cut off, then, and only then, with even 7 volts or around there, really low, as he mentioned in the 661 patent, the water can be set to oscillate between the plates, and be broken apart. Higher voltage just means the "amplitude" of the oscialltions is increased, more force.
John Keely's Laws of Harmony (1898)-> 40 powerful laws:
John Ernst Worrell Keely direct relation to Stanley Allen Meyer and Dr. Andrija Puharich etc.

Law of Chemical Dissociation
"If the pitch of either atom, in a molecule, be raised or lowered; or, if they both be unequally raised or lowered in pitch until the mutual ratio be that of a discord; or, if the oscillation amplitude be augmented by heat until the atoms are with the concentric waves of attraction, - the atoms will separate."

Law of Variation of Atomic Pitch by Electricity and Magnetism
"Electricity and Magnetism produce internal vibrations in the atom, which are followed by proportional changes in volume and, therefore, pitch."

Br,
Webmug

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #102 on: December 06, 2011, 15:02:19 pm »
Hi,

I see a all types of VIC cores, but never a list of used material. So please post your core material what you are using.
Personally I think the Initial permeability (μi) should be high. I never tested high μi. Look for Mn-Zn.

Soft ferrites
Ferrites that are used in transformer or electromagnetic cores contain nickel, zinc, and/or manganese compounds. They have a low coercivity and are called soft ferrites. The low coercivity means the material's magnetization can easily reverse direction without dissipating much energy (hysteresis losses), while the material's high resistivity prevents eddy currents in the core, another source of energy loss. Because of their comparatively low losses at high frequencies, they are extensively used in the cores of RF transformers and inductors in applications such as switched-mode power supplies (SMPS).

The most common soft ferrites are manganese-zinc (MnZn, with the formula MnaZn(1-a)Fe2O4) and nickel-zinc (NiZn, with the formula NiaZn(1-a)Fe2O4). NiZn ferrites exhibit higher resistivity than MnZn, and are therefore more suitable for frequencies above 1 MHz. MnZn have in comparison higher permeability and saturation induction.

http://www.bnf.com.hk/new_page_1.htm
http://www.bnf.com.hk/new_page_3.htm

Ferrite - Manganese Zinc (Mn-Zn)

My VIC core materials:
----------------------
Iron
----------------------
Plates (silicon alloy steel lamination)
----------------------
Ferrite - Nickel Zinc (Ni-Zn)
Material //    μi   // Bms(Gs) // Hc(Oe) // Br(Gs) // Tc(℃) // ρ(Ω-cm) // Frequency(MHz) // αur x 10-6/oC
A2G      // 300 // 2800      // 0.52     // 1500   // 160     // 1*107    // 0.1~3  // 20~45
----------------------
400HH material 67 u=40 (Initial Permeability 40) B=2300 H=20 Br=800
----------------------

Br,
Webmug

« Last Edit: December 07, 2011, 11:28:10 am by webmug »

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Re: Resonance WFC
« Reply #103 on: January 07, 2012, 19:08:05 pm »
I totally agree. Please post magnetic parameters of cores used (AI appreciated).

There is no chance to compare wind counts without those magnetic parameters.

pragma