Author Topic: Quenching circuit  (Read 5870 times)

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Re: Quenching circuit
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2009, 20:09:35 pm »
thats what i'm talking about

the min size in my thoughts of each tube can be bigger depending on the pressure because you have anyway higher speed because of the pressure do you understand my point?

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Re: Quenching circuit
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2009, 20:44:22 pm »


I believed the ceramic alumina material was absorbing all the heat from the flashback flame so it died before it reached the cell.

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Re: Quenching circuit
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2009, 21:32:27 pm »
If you have too low a pressure your flame will melt your nozzle.
The non-combustible gasses, ie Nitrogen, mixed with the gas, lifts the flame up above the nozzle so it wont melt.
Alumina has a melting point around 3000 degrees F, and the flame can reach 5000 degrees F, or over 20,000 degrees with the Hydrogen Fracturing Process.
Alumina was chosen because of the high melting temperature and that the holes will maintain their size and shape, whereas brass, copper, and so on will erode and widen the hole after some use.
The quenching tube is for safe transportation of the gas, not to act as a nozzle.

Stan says all of this clearly, if you want to understand him, you should listen to him :)

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Re: Quenching circuit
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2009, 22:05:39 pm »
If you make a experimentation like inducing a flash back with the gas being sucked from the cell not pumped by it you will see than that it will explode because the speed of the gas will be too slow. How do you explain this? did you tried or can check this?
Thats why i believe it have to do with the speed of the traveling gas.

Where did you bought this alumina stuff?

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Re: Quenching circuit
« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2009, 22:53:14 pm »
the flame can not travel back through the quenching tube with the recomended size of .015-.025 inch period.It can not go through the small passage way.No matter what the speed or pressure.If it's under vacuum,than nothing can burn in that enviorment.
Don

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Re: Quenching circuit
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2009, 01:15:05 am »
stan also mentions that with the quenching circuit he also has non combustable gasses in the lines and the gasses will seperate meaning you will have clumps of hydrogen and oxygen and u will have clumps of carbon...  so if there were a flash back then it is interupted by a gap of non combustable...

he mentions that when you produce they hydrogen and oxygen from water there is also non combustable gases that are being released.