Author Topic: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly  (Read 148402 times)

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #296 on: January 25, 2010, 17:06:04 pm »
webmug,

yea im planning on him putting 4-5 holes in the top and bottom cap.. the hole will match the dia of the gap..

im curious to see how this thing works hooked to the rotary vic. i also have a set up like the electrical polarization unit... i dont have that big of a powerstat.. mine is 125v 2.25 amp..
i made a delrin bobbin with 7 cavities at about 1/16 inch for one of them e52 style e core ferrites..

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #297 on: January 25, 2010, 22:56:51 pm »
Outlaw, I am going to send in 0-12 volts 120 Hz pulsed DC (rectified wall current), from the variac, which is how my current setup works with the normal alternator

Then I may try a smoothing cap on that for straight DC, then I might try the Jolt circuit for gating and pulsing. I'll need a scope and some help with the electronics though.

If the RVIC starts splitting distilled water then it's doing the impossible, so i'll probably build a bigger cell with more tubes to get more out of it.

By dimensions I meant how long is the tube set? 3" 6" ? I can't really tell.

I am guessing the RVIC can probably power a huge tubular cell.

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #298 on: January 25, 2010, 23:45:24 pm »
It will split distilled water .

It wont be doing anything impossible .

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #299 on: January 26, 2010, 01:17:57 am »
I know many people have split distilled water, but according to conventional science and electrolysis, isn't it supposed to be impossible?

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #300 on: January 26, 2010, 02:37:05 am »
yea.. i remember in 10th grade chemistry a experiment the teacher performed with water.. she was attepting to light a light bulb through 2 leads in distilled water.. the bulb would not light so it was obvious that the distilled water would not allow current. then she added salt to the mix and we had light... dankie is just being a smart a$$ lol as well as showing his faith in voltrolysis..


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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #301 on: February 05, 2010, 01:47:30 am »
I have the cell cleaned up, and the front of the alternator mounted, I need to finish up some electrical connections and get it all together. Finding the time I need to get this done is hard with school, and a bunch of other stuff on the go, but it's getting exciting.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/Picture21-2.png)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/Picture22-1.png)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/Picture23-2.png)

Just tap water in it now...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/Picture24-3.png)

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #302 on: February 05, 2010, 02:14:51 am »
looks good don.. im excited for you !!! cant wait to hear the results!! i should be getting the rest of my wire and other parts from the electronics store tomorrow after work.

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #303 on: February 05, 2010, 02:29:45 am »
I measured the resistance of my rotor, 2.9 Ohms.

Stan says in the first dune buggy idle video "5 volts and 2 amps, 10 watts" ... that means the resistance of his rotor was at most 2.5 Ohms.

If I put 5 volts across my rotor I will get 1.72 Amps.

To anyone who has an alternator... can you measure your rotor's resistance please? I would like to see if this matters at all, considering the possibility of rewinding the rotor with a lower resistance.