Author Topic: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly  (Read 148399 times)

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #264 on: January 08, 2010, 18:54:25 pm »
handyandy, the RVIC is basically 3 VIC's in one, each phase can be thought of as a VIC, when I said it has a 50% duty cycle from the rectified AC I was saying this in the context of a single phase. Each phase then connects together into a single wire after the isolation diodes, but the secondary, chokes, and blocking diodes of each phase all act individually before the phases merge.

Each phase is individually half wave rectified by the blocking diode, therefore 50% duty cycle DC,

Then, the isolation diode combines the three phases into one wire, and one wave form, without allowing them to interact with each other backwards through the same wires on the stator.

The only interaction from the three phases on the stator is mutual inductance. You can read on the first page of this topic what I wrote about the mutual inductance of the three phases, I'll spend more time on this later, when I have a scope hooked up, which will provide a much more valuable insight to the function of the RVIC.

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #265 on: January 08, 2010, 19:36:33 pm »
Quote
Each phase is individually half wave rectified by the blocking diode, therefore 50% duty cycle DC, 

this is true, but also each vic phase is interating with the rotor ac field fully not just the secondarys.... you cant see it as the secondary being the only ones  affected  by the rotor field... all three wires will be effected  by the ac sine. rectified or not since they are all incorperated  in the same geometircal config  being subjected to a ac oscilating field (rotor)

this is what i mean when i said when the pulse is 180 in sending current out of the positive choke..  the positive choke is  being subjected to the rotor pulse and u get the force of electrons toward the diode being generated in the choke , while you have the secondary trying to pull electrons from the diode.. so the work to transfer electrons through the diode is being performed from both sides...  while  when the rotor field goes 180 out  it will put a force of electrons on the diode from secondary which will be blocked from producing current into positive choke and  the positive choke will be pulling electrons away from the diode.....  the diode between the cell and the choke prevents this negative upswing from the 180 out in voltage and u get the unipolar potential  pulse aka 50 percent duty in the positive excitor. but the positive choke doesnt  maintain a unipolar direction of current...  the more electrons that are removed from the positive choke.. the less force you have of electron pushing on the diode between the choke and water... the more electrons that are removed the more they want to stay because of being out numbered by positive potential.  so what you get is oscillating low count of electrons in the positive choke being ruber banded back  and forth from rotor field.  that are being plucked out continualy in a oscillating manner..

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #266 on: January 08, 2010, 22:14:16 pm »
Hi Donald,

I'll back over to the beginnings the posts in this topic.  It's a looong thead and I've been trying to follow it.  I'll reserve comment until then.  I will be curious also what you see as output on a scope.  I'm glad also you spotted one of Stan's patents where he pulses the rotor which is exactly Dave Lawton's alternator setup more or less his interpretation.  But oh well, Stan didn't really leave us that much to go on.   It may have been Stan just covering his bases hard to tell but look at the box certainly the rotary voltage intensifier in his box did more than just modify or handle the secondary output from the alternator.  I'm pretty sure he at least investigated pulsing the rotor.  It's what I would do to fully investigate the effect.  Simple enough with a 555 or go with a DL circuit although I believe it's the wrong path.  It's not what Stan was doing I believe.

Regards,
Andy

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #267 on: January 09, 2010, 21:27:24 pm »
here are some pics of my hand powered coil winder..

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #268 on: January 09, 2010, 21:44:10 pm »
and here is the product from a hand powered coil winder

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #269 on: January 09, 2010, 23:18:19 pm »
Looks good outlaw, that is a lot of work to do by hand!

how many turns per loop?

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #270 on: January 09, 2010, 23:28:42 pm »
27 gauge  30 turns each.. so the bifiilars have 60 per loop..  its not to bad i just need to get a counter on it so i dont have to count and i will be happy..

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #271 on: January 10, 2010, 06:14:29 am »
Well I think there is something to the dynamic and static thing , dc offset is need yet a battery in the mix is just too inefficient from the looks of it .

Have to keep that dc pull somehow , I notice many caps with the Stephen setup , this is where he gets his dc from .