Author Topic: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?  (Read 7366 times)

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Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« on: September 23, 2009, 11:14:49 am »
Hi folks,

Stan Meyer states that the watermolecule releases electrons in the proces of waterfractioning.
Still the question if all Meyers processes are electrolysis of not.
But anyway.

Oxidation is the loss of electrons, reduction is the gain of electrons.
Electrolysis is an oxidation proces.

Conduction of current

Electricity is a flow of electrons around a circuit.

The electrolyte (liquid that conducts electricity) does so by means of ions depositing and picking up electrons from each electrode. Electrons are picked up by positive ions at the cathode and electrons are deposited by negative ions at the anode. Although the electrons have not technically been passed through the conducting liquid, from the point of view of the battery they have gone into the solution via the cathode and are exiting via the anode. As far as the battery is concerned there is a flow of electrons through the cell.

Stages:

Electron leaves battery and goes to cathode
Electron leaves cathode and goes to positive ion (making it neutral and releasing it from the liquid)
Negative ion drops off electron at the anode (and becomes neutral in the process)
Electron goes up from the anode to the battery
Net result: The battery sends out 1 electron from the negative side and receives 1 electron at the positive side.

In other words: When driven by an external source of voltage, H+ ions flow to the cathode to combine with electrons to produce hydrogen gas in a reduction reaction. Likewise, OH? ions flow to the anode to release electrons and an H+ ion to produce oxygen gas in an oxidation reaction.

So, what did Stan Meyer do with his chokes?
Did he pick up those drop off electrons, like i did with my latest circuit, and re-used them too?

Steve




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Re: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2009, 13:48:55 pm »
By restricting amps he prevents electrons from entering the water bath, like a capacitor, you don't have electrons flowing between the plates, just voltage across the gap. There is unavoidable leakage, but it is not part of Stan's process.

When Stan says 'liberated electrons' he means the valence electrons are pulled right out of the water molecules by the voltage, then they would want to join back up with the gas atoms to stabilize, but Stan says "i really don't want to stabilize", and this is where he goes into the electron extraction circuit, by applying a positive voltage across a light bulb connected to the cell, the cell acts as a negative terminal, and the liberated electrons and drawn out of the water bath and used as electricity to run the light and so on.

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Re: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2009, 18:26:00 pm »
By restricting amps he prevents electrons from entering the water bath, like a capacitor, you don't have electrons flowing between the plates, just voltage across the gap. There is unavoidable leakage, but it is not part of Stan's process.

When Stan says 'liberated electrons' he means the valence electrons are pulled right out of the water molecules by the voltage, then they would want to join back up with the gas atoms to stabilize, but Stan says "i really don't want to stabilize", and this is where he goes into the electron extraction circuit, by applying a positive voltage across a light bulb connected to the cell, the cell acts as a negative terminal, and the liberated electrons and drawn out of the water bath and used as electricity to run the light and so on.

Some of you are still at school. All schools have vandergraaf generators.
I would like to see somebody taking 2 electrodes, some water and a VDG generator and run a test with that.
Anybody?

Steve


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Re: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2009, 20:31:50 pm »
There is one in the Physics lab, but i'm in engineering so they are not really going to let me play with it, what were you thinking of?

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Re: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2009, 10:04:00 am »
Steve, I believe I have solved what Stan is talking about when he makes that statement...Please see my "Multipactor" thread on my projects section

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Re: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2009, 10:29:47 am »
There is one in the Physics lab, but i'm in engineering so they are not really going to let me play with it, what were you thinking of?

Well, i would like to see some tests:
1. 2 metal electrodes in tapwater. 1 connected to ground and 1 to the metalhood/doom of the VDG
2. 1 metal electrode to ground and 1 plastic electrode to metalhood/doom
3. something else that conducts static well and use that. Maybe an insulated metal electrode also.

If you can produce 1 buble, then that is a good sign. Hopefully a little bit more then one...:-)
Can you try that Donald?

Steve



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Re: Liberated electrons. What does that mean?
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2009, 10:30:31 am »
Steve, I believe I have solved what Stan is talking about when he makes that statement...Please see my "Multipactor" thread on my projects section
ok, i  will have a look.

Steve