Author Topic: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus  (Read 15142 times)

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2009, 07:03:25 am »
Disagree all you want Dankie.   You are wrong. 

Look at several  decent SMPS's.  How many 555 timers do you see providing the PWM ?  I'll tell you how many .  NONE  !   

You do not understand the meaning of  "stable"  when it comes to advanced analog electronics.  When the  frequency lf a 555 is changed the duty cycle changes ..... and vice versa. That is very essence of "unstable".  That includes the LMC555.  Fast does not mean stable.

Anyone  can make an oscillator from a Schmitt inverter and a couple of external parts that is more "stable" than any 555 timer.   

It may make little difference in simple hobby circuits like you are used to.  But stability makes a huge difference in SMPS design.

So let's see your "stable"  flyback controller circuit that uses a  555 timer.  I want to see how you implement current limiting,  how you detect discontinuous mode, and how you adjust pulse width without affecting frequency.   


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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2009, 11:51:45 am »
For the record,  the Eccles patent is only a patent application and it was abandoned prior to review.  No patent was ever issued.  That may nor may not be relevant.
Thanks Goeytex, that information is indeed important to me, does this mean the patent was never reviewed by a patent office? If it was and not issued the case is clear, but if they just denied the review because of the impossibility of the thing i'd try it.

thanks for the information on the flyback drivers. i'll take that into account, i just used a 555 because i had one here, i'll give your circuit a try. I also have LTSpice.

A TV flyback will not work well at 400hz. The duty cycle will have to be extremely low  to prevent core saturation and over current. This means the dead time will be huge compared to the on time.  TV flybacks typically run at 15Khz with an applied pulse width of a few microseconds. 
Yeah i haven't thought about that. The duty cycle will be around 40% of 400Hz, i'll have to check the patent application again to see if the frequency is important (i guess not).

A TV flyback could possibly work with this IC as long as the primary inductance is around 10 uh. But I imagine that the current will have to be reduced from the 8 amps peak I have set here.   Current is set with R5.  The wire size used on the primary should give a good clue as the the primary current the transformer can handle.  Alternatively,  a custom transformer could be wound.  I would try a gapped E-Core that has a saturation current above 10 amps.
I'd rather avoid making a custom transformer too test a patent which has a good chance of not working.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2009, 12:44:22 pm by haithar »

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2009, 14:50:00 pm »
Hi Haither

According to WIPO   the patent was abandoned by Eccles, Davies et al,  when they failed to pay the required fees prior to review.  Therefore it was never reviewed.  It was not denied upon principle of operation.


For a simple test a 555 may be adequate,  but implementing any kind of current control, feedback etc will be more than challenging.  I would set the 555 frequency at 15 Khz or so and the pulse width at 1 us. Then gradually increase  the pulse width  while looking at a scope reading of primary current.  The primary current signal should look similar to what you see in the Spice simulation. Operation should be in discontinuous mode,  meaning the current should rise to Ipeak and then fall to zero, with some dead time in between current pulses.  A CMOS  555 cannot adequately drive a Power Mosfet  so some kind of driver circuit will be needed.  A  non CMOS   555 can source and sink about 200 ma,  and while not ideal, should be able to directly drive a FET.

If you go to National Semiconductors web site and get the datasheet for the LMC555,  there is one example circuit in figure 8 that might work ok.  A voltage level input to pin 5 controls the  pulse width.  This circuit will require an external oscillator or another 555  to provide the pulse train to  Pin 2.   I may simulate it in Spice and see how it does.

Goey

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2009, 20:52:55 pm »
Well, if you have questions for Tad, he is a member here....
wait, i have skipped this.
tad got meyers fully replicated, is a member of this forum? and regardless no one else has figured it out?

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2009, 10:50:06 am »
Well, if you have questions for Tad, he is a member here....
wait, i have skipped this.
tad got meyers fully replicated, is a member of this forum? and regardless no one else has figured it out?

Hi Haithar,

We have more famous members  here, then you know... ;)

Tad is known here as " Unclefester "
We asked him a lot of questions on his replication:

Go have a look:   Login to see usernames


Regards
Steve

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2009, 14:38:46 pm »
Well Tad should have investigated this computer control thing .

The difficulty of it is only superficial , there isonly a few complicated IC's there , the pll concept is pretty rough .

Most noobie electronics students at my school will have a good portion of the semester dedicated to this  , if bored unmotivated students can get it so can everybody here .

I dont even study small electronics , this is all new to me , I study routines and logic gates . This is a routine , a complicated routine but still a routine .

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2009, 17:17:15 pm »
weren't you once talking about studying agriculture or something like that? anyway there are pll ic's, i have found a nice website on this topic, which i included a download of, because it is not online anymore. (see attachment) the state-of-art way would of course be a microcontroller.
edit: i found a link on archive.org: http://web.archive.org/web/20080214161414/http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/pll/pll.html

thanks stevie i'll read through the topic you mentioned where unclefester posted in regularly.
also i finished building the "cell" today, i begin to wonder if the inventors ever built this thing, 5mm is a large gap for an electrical field but a small gap to see if there's any production going on. my high voltage wire arrived too. will post some photos soon.

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Re: Chris R. Eccles Water Fracture Apparatus
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2009, 18:25:57 pm »
weren't you once talking about studying agriculture or something like that? anyway there are pll ic's, i have found a nice website on this topic, which i included a download of, because it is not online anymore. (see attachment) the state-of-art way would of course be a microcontroller.
edit: i found a link on archive.org: http://web.archive.org/web/20080214161414/http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/pll/pll.html

thanks stevie i'll read through the topic you mentioned where unclefester posted in regularly.
also i finished building the "cell" today, i begin to wonder if the inventors ever built this thing, 5mm is a large gap for an electrical field but a small gap to see if there's any production going on. my high voltage wire arrived too. will post some photos soon.

Ya I was studying in construction plan designing

But I dropped that , too boring .

Im better in electronics , and I think it suits my passion better lol .