Author Topic: Bob and Stan explained  (Read 2550 times)

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Bob and Stan explained
« on: July 26, 2009, 21:11:24 pm »
I just made a drawing up for myself.
Its based on the idea's of Bob.

The idea is using a steady bias DC on the WFC. With 1 tube and with use of KOH, just must think about 2V.
The pulsing is done on a toroid with very short high peak pulses. Short enough that almost no BEMF is produced..
The sharp pulses are picked up on top of the DC tru the toroid.
That must cause some kind of reaction.
All chokes are there to preved emf leakage.

Because of the bridge rectifier, there is no separated diode needed.
What do you guys think of this? I havent test it, but its a pretty nice circuit.


Steve

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Bob and Stan explained
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2009, 21:39:08 pm »
Yes it looks good.
 
Also a type of double power source so another signal will get injected upon the toroid.
 
I'm very interested in your outcome for this test.

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Bob and Stan explained
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2009, 16:11:38 pm »
I have made a simulation of the circuit.
I was expecting to see spikes on top of bias base of lets say 4 volts.
I was surprised to see at the end the famous Stanley Meyer stepup ramp on top on of the 4V bias base...

Here some bad pics....

It seems Stan and Bob are doing the same trick.
The trick is: place a stationary (bias) between the electrodes. Then apply a stepup puls on top of that bias voltage that rips the electrons from the molecules.....

Maybe we need stepup spikes, maybe just this ramp....


« Last Edit: July 27, 2009, 16:58:34 pm by Steve »

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Bob and Stan explained
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2009, 16:27:41 pm »
I can see that Stephen meyers was also using a dc bias .

He was also filtering his power somehow with those components of the impedance matching circuit and leaving behinh some sort of inductive ringing phenomena

I am just trying to grasp the patent while I finish up this pcb , it looks pretty different than Stans unipolar VIC thing .

So a dual 3 phase synchronized signal generator .... check ;)

Common components small caps coils resistors ....check

stainless steel plates or tubes , neutral left and right .... uncheck , not yet

It all looks pretty basic but then again looks can be deceiving , then again I'm happy to be just messing around with small common components and just sticking to something simple for a change

Stepeh was using a sine wave , its less hard to get a signal going throught a transformer than a pulsed dc .

People have trouble transfering that pulsed dc to usable power .
« Last Edit: July 27, 2009, 17:03:53 pm by Dankie »