Author Topic: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission  (Read 7206 times)

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Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« on: June 28, 2009, 00:41:09 am »
This is interesting:


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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2009, 01:13:31 am »
Indeed.  I was at aepc 2009 and witnessed Karl Palsness' presentation.  Alex Petty was demonstrating something similar with his partner  Jeffrey Cook.  Not exactly wireless transmission.  See Karl Palsness' presentation on youtube.com (hydroalternation's channel) and his other youtube.com videos (palsness) and his thread on energeticforum.com.  Then read Telsa's lectures again in a new light.

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Andy

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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2009, 10:27:30 am »
It is nice and it is different.
The question now is if this methode of powerdistribution is more efficient or not.
And is it usefull for making hydrogen out of water?

Just my 2 cents....


Steve

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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2009, 19:01:10 pm »
That will have to be determined.

The closest "replication" of a hairpin circuit for producing hydroxy is Dave Lawton's "cold electricity" wfc replication.  If you follow the flow it's similar to Karl Palsness' Tesla stout copper rod or hairpin circuit.  The missing element according to Karl is mass.  That's my take on it.  Not what Karl said as regards to hydroxy generation but what I think.  Watch the videos, re-read Tesla and experiment.

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Andy

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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2009, 19:38:53 pm »
That will have to be determined.

The closest "replication" of a hairpin circuit for producing hydroxy is Dave Lawton's "cold electricity" wfc replication.  If you follow the flow it's similar to Karl Palsness' Tesla stout copper rod or hairpin circuit.  The missing element according to Karl is mass.  That's my take on it.  Not what Karl said as regards to hydroxy generation but what I think.  Watch the videos, re-read Tesla and experiment.

Regards,
Andy

Did Dave Lawtons really replicate Meyers ?

I believe so , that man is certainly one of most educated people on earth and has military connections , but did we get the right info from him ?

I believe not... LOL



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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2009, 20:05:39 pm »
Ok , this seems pretty easy , I might just replicate this thing .

This looks like OU to me .

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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2009, 21:09:42 pm »
This is interesting:

gone
went private

tesla hairpin is 'just' a dielectric oscillator, exatly what meyer did, aka polarization process.

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Re: Tesla Hairpin Circuit Wireless transmission
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2009, 21:14:11 pm »
It is nice and it is different.
The question now is if this methode of powerdistribution is more efficient or not.
And is it usefull for making hydrogen out of water?

Just my 2 cents....


Steve
Yes it is, ohm's law doesnt apply, no heat gets dissipated.
I think it can create hydrogen if the frequency is adjusted to that of water, so resonating displacement currents occur, and no electric currents.