Author Topic: Atomic Hydrogen  (Read 18285 times)

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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2013, 16:43:59 pm »
Be careful, this process creates a plethora of "soft x-rays", inside of a grounded engine would produce no ill-effects as the engine shields...however, messing with it unshielded is dangerous.

Can you explain, please?

I want to know more on this... :)

Steve

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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #41 on: April 08, 2013, 21:04:05 pm »
Well, when working with voltages at <100 it isn't really an issue. However, as the voltage potential increases as does the ionizing power of the subsequent rf produced in the discharge.
There was another man besides Meyer who developed a water plug for use in ICEs, his name escapes me at the moment...however, he was a lead engineer of skunkworks, and so the government said "Due to the "soft x-ray" radiation released during (what he labeled) "radiolysis", they would not allow production for civilians, but, due to "his" extensive background, they would allow him to continue to drive his car". The whole time knowing that, the electro-negative engine block would ground out all radiation.

We all want to directly observe our experiments, however, a lot, if not all discharges should be shielded...do an experiment, run a simple discharge through air next to a speaker with a bias power of a couple volts (just enough to make the electromagnet energize and float the cone)...it will pick up that spark gap as noise (it's all radiation). Physically we are essentially micro and macrocosms of RLC circuits, we pick up all that radiation just like the coil...the problem arises when you start subjecting yourself to discharges of higher than 100volts, around 5kv and there is serious risk of cellular degradation. The danger is inversely related to distance and directly related eV...the problem isn't that we take on too much charge or anything...it's due to the fact that light is a particle-wave, and its particle characteristic is like a cannonball to our DNA.

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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #42 on: April 09, 2013, 05:23:33 am »
Herman Anderson was his name.

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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2013, 09:02:35 am »
so my question is:
What kind of hydrogen does an electrolyser produce?

H1 and HO or H2?

The other question is if there is a difference between nascent and atomic hydrogen.

Last question for you radiant is if you have tried to create H1 like Andersen did?


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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #44 on: April 09, 2013, 10:37:28 am »
H1 would exist for a fraction of time whatever you do you must do it inside the engine or very close to it..actually there is something that most people dont know that is HOH or HHO disintegrates radioactive materials.. what if you make D2O or H2O "radioactive" for a moment and mix it with HHO?

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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #45 on: April 09, 2013, 18:44:46 pm »
Two electrodes are wired to the electrical source and immersed in a container of water. When electricity is applied, the water molecules begin to split, forming unstable ions of hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-).

The hydrogen ions, which are missing an electron, are positively charged. They migrate toward the negative electrode where free electrons are flowing into the water. Here the hydrogen ions gain an electron to form stable hydrogen atoms. Individual hydrogen atoms combine to form hydrogen molecules (H2), which bubble to the surface. This reaction can be expressed as: 2 H+ + 2 e- → H 2.


These are the basics....


So what can we do the get H1 and not H2?


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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #46 on: April 09, 2013, 18:57:34 pm »
Could it be possible to push to H1 away from the negative electrode, so that we prevent molecule forming H2?
Like brownsgas, pulsing the dc source? Aka, switching of power, so more H1 remain in the gas?

Other option, is the ionize ambient air into Nitrogen and push that thru the waterbath with all H1 atoms? Instead of reacting with electrons from the negative electrode, H1 will react with N into ammonia....orso...

What are your thoughts, dear members of this great forum?

Steve

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Re: Atomic Hydrogen
« Reply #47 on: April 10, 2013, 02:40:26 am »
Its aways a good idea to try figure the reaction... but is too impossible without being a very expert in chemistry or physics...

Since this is a consuming task, i avoid it as it consumes my time... and hardly any conclusion would be decisive...

Tutanka use to talk about this mix of nitrogen and hydrogen but i don't know if this is really a good idea...

I think that the only way to keep the hydrogen from forming diatomic molecules is to maintain it ionized.. but this is a very big problem since the greater is the collection of atoms so will be the collection of charges... if they are in a can for example than the potential would grow ...