Author Topic: Phase and anti phase  (Read 7056 times)

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Re: Phase and anti phase
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2009, 00:27:50 am »
Well, Stan said that his hydrogen generator worked on a system that was 180 degrees out of phase.

"180 degrees out of phase with the electrolysis process"

Electrolysis:
High amps
Low volts
Chemicals
Electrons in
Chemical Process
Inefficient

Stan:
Low amps
High volts
No Chemicals
Electrons out
Physical Process
Efficient

Everywhere electrolysis is up, Stan is down, when electrolysis is one thing, Stan's is the other. It is the complete opposite. 180 degrees out of phase.

This new "neutrinolysis" term has me very excited , I believe there is something here and it smells very very nice .

« Last Edit: April 23, 2009, 00:48:24 am by Dankie »

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Re: Phase and anti phase
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2009, 03:56:21 am »
Hi,

Well, Stan said that his hydrogen generator worked on a system that was 180 degrees out of phase.
Sofar i can follow Dankie. The question is what was 180 out of phase?
If you hit voltage against voltage, you get zero.
Same frequency against same frequency = noice
In a RC setup you can shift voltage against amps.
What would it bring if you cut of the signal before amp kick in and after voltage raised?

Again, i just wrote some food for thoughts

br
Steve

180 degrees out of phase, what is it; The first wave will be 180 degrees out of phase with the second wave. The first wave will start and proceed to 180 degree's, A second wave starts 180 Of the first wave and 0 degree's of itself. If dc then the waveform will be Bumpy Dc, If Ac the waveform will be a perfect sine wave. Because it is out of phase this doesn't mean that waveform is coming from anything other than a ground and hot wire, or neutral and neutral, "Ac." Neutrals go both ways.

If it was 120 degree's out of phase, the second wave would begin 120 degree's into the first wave, appearing like overlapped bumps which is exactly what 3 phase does, To make it 160 out of phase you would need to put more distance between each Coil when overlapping.

If it is in phase, then it isn't any degree out. Normal 120 volt mains voltage is also 180 degree's out of phase, If you full wave rectify the mains of 120 you will get 180 out of phase dc.

Misunderstanding for me.



« Last Edit: April 23, 2009, 06:44:22 am by Brian Coats »

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Re: Phase and anti phase
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2009, 04:52:15 am »
now your seeing what i am seeing donald

the deffinition for this smell is vice versa..remember theres 2 ways to skin a cat.. the right way and the wrong way.

Quote
180 degrees out of phase with the electrolysis process"

Electrolysis:
High amps
Low volts
Chemicals
Electrons in
Chemical Process
Inefficient

Stan:
Low amps
High volts
No Chemicals
Electrons out
Physical Process
Efficient

Everywhere electrolysis is up, Stan is down, when electrolysis is one thing, Stan's is the other. It is the complete opposite. 180 degrees out of phase.