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Projects by members => Projects by members => Electrotek => Topic started by: tektrical on July 01, 2019, 23:04:31 pm

Title: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 01, 2019, 23:04:31 pm
I just finished building a new power supply for my open air plasma experiments.  This is actually my Puff Spark plasmoid circuit, but it's designed for continuous operation, rather than just a shot now and then.  I'm using the transformer, capacitor and diode from a MW oven, along with a defibrillator inductor.  This inductor is rated at 50 miliHenry, but other components would also work.  (Such as a winding from another MOT.)  The neutral wire from the mains is connected to the inside of the MOT's primary, and the inside of the MOT's secondary is connected to the core, as is the diode.  (The diode's arrow points away from the core.)  The auxilary capacitor is connected to my diode T-tap (powered through the inductor), and is there in case I want to use my Ball Lightning effect in conjunction with nanodrop HHO mist, from a compressed air aspirator.

Leedskalnin taught us that the diode's polarity determines whether the effect makes a "pup" sound, from a hollow plasmoid sphere popping, or a "phht" sound, from a plasmoid jet flinging out.  I'll set up a remote control if I ever drive the circuit with an rf inverter, since that may produce a continuously expanding plasmoid, the same as any other rf driven magnetic field.

I'll use this with my gradient plate mini particle accelerator.  I did an experiment in the past, with a ring magnet (from a magnetron) on top of the plate, and it converted a drop of water into a red plasma the size of a soft ball.

That's all for now.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 01, 2019, 23:57:50 pm
The spark from that auxiliary cap produces intense UV.  DO NOT make this spark to another arc without eye protection, such as UV certified sun glasses, or welding goggles.  This is especially true with the inductor in the charging circuit, since an extra amount of electrons will be pulled from the cap's single wire connection.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 02, 2019, 04:04:43 am
I misspoke in my opening post when I said "nanodrop mist hho from a compressed air aspirator".  I was actually referring to nano bubbles, filled with hho, and mixed into the water.  We've all seen a cloud of tiny bubbles.  I'm thinking that the ionizing thermal radiation from my plasmoid, together with the high temperature produced by the hho combustion, may be able to split some of the water mist going into my gradient plate 'test' injector.  It won't be long before I have my salvage gasoline motor air compressor up and running, and I can do some tests.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 03, 2019, 07:26:41 am
the ferrite in a magnetron is interesting shape and fragile

do you check the part number on the diodes?    = some are not always straight HV diodes
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 03, 2019, 17:29:40 pm
That's a good point about the diodes.  I've found at least four different kinds in the MW's I like to salvage when I find one.  It's like the oven manufactures use whatever kind they can get the best price on, at any given point.  I found a round one that acts like a hv switching diode.  Placed in reverse, there's no conduction until the potential reaches a certain point.  (Ideally, near the top of the waveform.). The sudden conduction allows a sine wave to simulate a square wave, similar to a spark gap, with a steep rise time.  These cascade diodes are lightly doped, so the reverse current doesn't damage the crystal.  And some MW diodes on the market are reversible.  The polarity can be changed by applying a reverse potential while heating the diode for a period of 24 hours.  Before I use an oven diode, I just make sure it will charge a cap.  The voltage drop test with a battery doesn't always work; some diodes show conduction in both directions, until an appropriate biasing potential is applied. 

edit: A TVS cascade diode makes a better switch than a heavily doped zener.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 05, 2019, 15:15:23 pm
The spark from that auxiliary cap produces intense UV.  DO NOT make this spark to another arc without eye protection, such as UV certified sun glasses, or welding goggles.  This is especially true with the inductor in the charging circuit, since an extra amount of electrons will be pulled from the cap's single wire connection.
An open spark like this is not only producing UV.
It creates a whole spectrum of radiation...
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 05, 2019, 23:07:52 pm
You're certainly right about that.  Arc flash is a dangerous business, especially when dealing with exotic energy.  The best thing to do is keep the arc enclosed, shielded from view, and just 'observe' the sound.  And the effect.  That's what I plan to do, keep the flash itself inside my test Injector.  But I don't think this spark produces any neutrons, with either polarity.  And I did have some good fireworks yesterday, when I tested my new set up.  Next year on the Fourth of July I'll do a Roman Candle.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 27, 2019, 22:10:05 pm
I finally had some time to do an experiment with my MOT setup.  I took the two main output wires and connected them to a spark gap, so I can blow gasses and mist through the arc.  (Like an atomic hydrogen torch.)  For the first basic test I used a micro jet soldering torch, with the flame locked on.  The arc caused the flame to turn red, which is characteristic of hydro carbons in general, and the red color can indicate the presence of hydrogen ions.  After passing through the arc, the flame extended to a distance of 4 1/2", which is much longer than normal.  And I can feel the heat a good foot out.  So I think this is a good candidate for use with TT Brown's 'flame on a wire' electrokinetic generator.  (Patent #3,022,430.)  After a few seconds, the ss rods for the spark gap got really hot and started throwing sparks.  And the MOT started smoking.  But it didn't fry the diode, since my T spark still worked.  When I have time, I'll try blowing some water mist through the arc, and see if it's red as well.  And as hot as this plasma jet is, it might work with a 3D metal printer, as an alternative to the expensive laser which is normally used to help the metal droplets blend in with the surface.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 30, 2019, 00:31:11 am
I tried blowing just compressed air through the arc.  This produced a cone shape, as with the jet torch, but not as long.  Also, rather than a red color, the blown arc was a blueish gray.  I interpret this as indicating the presence of Dark Energy.  (Gray is low intensity black.) When an electrode, such as an arc, is conducting exotic energy, Dark Energy will appear across the face of any notches or depressions in the surface.  With the blown arc, the plasmoid will stretch at various points, producing voids.  Dark Energy extends the surface across these voids.  This may provide a mechanism for producing excess energy, sourced by the ambient light combining with the exotic energy to produce the black color.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 30, 2019, 08:31:23 am
are you going to try doping ?
there might be some interesting rocks out your way, glass maybe
the plasma might polarise a molten mass, maybe make home grown semi conductors.
do you have shielding around the trans etc , never know what is radiating . maybe experiment inside an empty mic oven case …?
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 31, 2019, 19:46:08 pm
I do have a good collection of small rocks I've accumulated, intending to do some plasma mining experiments.  The doping suggestion, for semiconductors, also makes me think about touching the plasma jet with some flux, to help melt the rock.  So there's two good ideas right there.  (Thanks). Melting the rock would be easier if the rock itself were one of the electrodes, which is feasible with a high enough potential.  (Selective voltage electrolysis could then separate specific elements from the melt.) And I tried the circuit with a much smaller cap, to prevent overheating.  It still produces ionizing radiation, as evidenced by the green plasma when I use copper wire electrodes.  With flame added, the #14 wire melts immediately.  And shielding is a really good idea.  I've found that emi can be blocked with a sheet of paper covered with three layers of VCR tape, at least in the 100W range.  I'll have to find out if it will shield longitudinal energy.  When I use two coils for the inductor, wired in series on a MOT core, I get a metallic sound from the arc - the loudest 'ping' I've gotten so far.  It's very important to shield this because Tesla reported that LE will convert mass into ether, cleaning a metallic film from the inside of an evacuated glass tube.  I'll investigate this further, for mining.  I saw an illustration back in the 50's showing how the chemical ether can be recondensed around a seed particle of a desired substance.  (That comic book was called "The beam of light heading for the Earth" and seems to describe the Temple 1 impact experiment).
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 01, 2019, 04:27:04 am

I don't know how or what John Hutchinson was up to but he collected rocks
they use plasma for cutting thru rocks . I saw one of those house restoration shows in Scotland, middle of no where and the guy cut thru a thick wall so all that stuff is doable.
I haven't done HV arc stuff for a while , the image of partly seeing thru my fingers kindve put me off, so shielding is a good idea for any hv ...interesting to watch someone else tho …;)
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 01, 2019, 18:50:32 pm
It sounds like you may have discovered Angel Light.  I read about some guy who built an apparatus around 20 feet long, with multiple arc outputs which were collimated into a single, non dispersive beam which he claimed could shoot down a satellite.  France agreed to buy it for a hundred million, but I don't remember if he was prosecuted for fraud when it didn't pan out, which often happens to greedy inventors who think they'll cash in on the weapons market.  And there's also the moral issue.  Through the wall indecent surveillance should be prohibited, and anyone who uses that light as a pleasure weapon should receive a maximum sanction.  So you're right to be apprehensive; some things in this world should just be left alone.  But there's surely other hv effects you can still play with?  I'll be happy when I can explode a candle flame (including its water vapor) inside a rocket nozzle, or combustion cylinder, with a minimal amount of energy.  And slicing through solid rock will also be of value.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 02, 2019, 03:21:03 am
the show was a tv show not me going to Scotland  ;)

in the old experiment books like pop mechanics etc they always use ford T coils which is what I used. the core is a cluster of iron wire , could probably use a contact set each end.
theyre good in the way they are self governing make n break
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 02, 2019, 05:37:34 am
That's a clue right there.  The vibrator can be tuned so the arc produces 'splatter voltage'. (Crank the tension screw in a ways, then slowly back it out till you hear a frying sound in the arc). If that's what produces the light-like energy, you can see it through a wall if your eyes are sensitive.  Or pick it, or it's reflection, up with a ccd camera.  Tesla designed the coil for Ford.  And you can buy reeds a half dozen at a time on EBay.  I used to play with those ignition coil boxes when I was a little kid, down on the farm, and someone seemingly popped out of thin air one day and showed me how to tune it.

edit:  For shielding, a half inch of hardwood will block it, but not sheet rock.  If it's blue, it'll go through a thin sheet of aluminium on plywood.  And orange goes through cement blocks and stucco.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 06, 2019, 05:15:46 am
I'm still working with this, testing all the variables and permutations.  The loudest metallic sound from the arc is with two MOT primary coils on the same core for the inductor, as long as the input is on the outside  of one coil and the output is on the inside of the other, with the other wires tied together.  This produces a strong attraction between the two coils each time the arc rattles.  When the in and out is on the same side of the coils, they bounce apart when the arc fires, without the metallic sound.  When only one coil is connected, and the other is shorted, there's still the bouncing repulsion.  Also, using two secondary coils for the inductor never produces the metallic sound.

I set up a cell and connected it to the second primary coil, rather than just shorting the coil, and this produces some pretty big bubbles, but no repulsion between the two coils on the core.  The cell is a 3/4" mesh grid around an 1/8" ss rod, and the arc fires around five or six times per second.

When the metallic sounding arc fires, this induces a steep inductive pulse in the second coil.  When the shunt arc goes out, the second coil's pulse falls off rapidly.  So this resembles Meyer's waveform, with a lower frequency, due to the wide gap between the cell's electrodes.

These steep inductive pulses, or spikes, are sometimes, erroneously, referred to as 'radiant' pulses.  In reality, the pulses don't become radiant until they hit a resistance and turn outwards, moving perpendicular to the circuit.  Since the water cell has a resistance, does this mean that Meyer's technology uses radiant energy?
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 10, 2019, 17:35:10 pm
The water jar is back on the shelf.  Using it allowed me to characterize the various components and determine that the best combination of coils for the inductor and the output pickup is two MOT primaries.  Testing it with my spherical cell didn't produce any bubbles at all - just some turbulence on the surface - BUT the greater load capacitance had an effect on how far the spark gap arc can be stretched.  And it's even blowing off to the side.  So I'll work with a capacitive load for a while.  If the arc is made to rotate as it jets out, the Lorentz force will cause it to extend, with the ionizing radiation in the spark producing a Self Generating Discharge cascade.  This relates to the dust devil replication project I've been thinking about for quite a while.  (Fifteen years since I drove by that black box road side demonstration). I just needed a continuous jet effect.  Also, a plasma jet is surgical at 273 kH, so each mineral could require a specific frequency, and/or phase composition.  And Tesla pointed out that Human Energy can be Increased by fixating atmospheric nitrogen with 120 kH at 100 kV.  This will help the air breathing hybrid rockets.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 12, 2019, 05:58:30 am
The neat thing about my water jar was after I switched over to using two electrode grids, one 3/4" and the other 2 1/4", I could see bubbles everywhere between the grids.  So they were either forming in the water, away from the grids, or they had a charge which spaced them apart at equal distances, even at the bottom of the cell.  Maybe both.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 20, 2019, 04:29:10 am
I've been having a lot of fun with my plasma circuit.  Using a single MOT primary as the inductor I'm getting flame like sparks shooting out from the spark gap.  These finger sparks are even shooting off the electrode itself, about a quarter inch from the gap's arc.  And when this happens it doesn't have any effect on the arc itself.  Which electrode throws the extra sparks depends on the diode polarity.

And I did do some more water cell experiments.  I built another one slightly smaller than half as big as the one I was using, but no bubbles.  I guess I got lucky and the big one had about the right amount of capacitance.  So I decided to make the smaller one into a variable capacitor, by using a C Stack geometry.  (See patent #4,179,627).  I used galvanized mesh for the two grids - which seems to be holding up without corrosion, using well water - and I placed the central electrode in a small water filled plastic tube for insulation.  The second insulated electrode is some more mesh around the outside of the cell.  By the patent, applying a potential to the insulated electrodes increases the amount of energy the water cell itself can hold.  With the cell electrodes hooked to the floating load coil, and the insulated electrodes tied across the spark gap, there were bubbles, although nothing spectacular.  When I went back to the first cell and added the outer grid, the bubble production fell way off.  Too much capacitance.  And I couldn't insulate the central electrode since that cell's all sealed up.

Now I'm going to start doing some advanced experiments with the shooting arc.  And I haven't forgotten that I was once strongly advised by an insider that sometimes certain kinds of tests should be done remotely.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 20, 2019, 09:05:24 am
I've been having a lot of fun with my plasma circuit.  Using a single MOT primary as the inductor I'm getting flame like sparks shooting out from the spark gap.  These finger sparks are even shooting off the electrode itself, about a quarter inch from the gap's arc.  And when this happens it doesn't have any effect on the arc itself.  Which electrode throws the extra sparks depends on the diode polarity.

And I did do some more water cell experiments.  I built another one slightly smaller than half as big as the one I was using, but no bubbles.  I guess I got lucky and the big one had about the right amount of capacitance.  So I decided to make the smaller one into a variable capacitor, by using a C Stack geometry.  (See patent #4,179,627).  I used galvanized mesh for the two grids - which seems to be holding up without corrosion, using well water - and I placed the central electrode in a small water filled plastic tube for insulation.  The second insulated electrode is some more mesh around the outside of the cell.  By the patent, applying a potential to the insulated electrodes increases the amount of energy the water cell itself can hold.  With the cell electrodes hooked to the floating load coil, and the insulated electrodes tied across the spark gap, there were bubbles, although nothing spectacular.  When I went back to the first cell and added the outer grid, the bubble production fell way off.  Too much capacitance.  And I couldn't insulate the central electrode since that cell's all sealed up.

Now I'm going to start doing some advanced experiments with the shooting arc.  And I haven't forgotten that I was once strongly advised by an insider that sometimes certain kinds of tests should be done remotely.


The invention is in the field of energy conversion and/or storage and relates to a device which can be variously used as a solar energy converter, capacitor, photoamplifier, a photomultiplier, a synchronizer, a switching device, a photodetector, electromagnetic radiation measuring device, an ion plasma device and a computer memory unit.

Its a multi functional device  :)
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 23, 2019, 16:09:51 pm
The perpendicular spark effect also works with AC.  Without the diode, the yellow arc is more pale and has a higher frequency sound.  The perpendicular sparks come off both electrodes a short distance from the gap.  They look like flower petals popping out in various directions.  This effect isn't anything like the work I've done in the past, pulling the arc itself out to the side.  I'll stay with this project for awhile.  An easily produced radiant energy effect opens up a lot of possibilities.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 25, 2019, 23:12:15 pm
it seems you have a lot of fun  ;)
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 25, 2019, 23:14:35 pm
can you measure the type of radiation?
Any x rays involved?
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 25, 2019, 23:46:39 pm
I don't see any X-rays with this.  The arc isn't white enough and the voltage is too low.  There probably would be with a similar setup pushing a much higher voltage.  The CEMF in the spark is the key.  But I do feel a lot of UV against my eyes, if I neglect to use my sun glasses.  Tesla recommended a minimum of 15kV, but I think I can make the sparks fly with this.  Otherwise, I'm upping the voltage.  I want that electrically conductive light which instantly dissociates water.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.rexresearch.com/nelsonarticles/rayguns101.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwj1-uvg_57kAhUCOH0KHVSOCdwQFjAAegQIBhAC&usg=AOvVaw23bfzXnEOimTb-xuH0ysgi
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 26, 2019, 09:37:47 am
didn't Marconi make a car emobilizer demonstration for mussolini
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 26, 2019, 14:12:42 pm
didn't Marconi make a car emobilizer demonstration for mussolini

Plse explain...
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 26, 2019, 18:12:07 pm
didn't Marconi make a car emobilizer demonstration for mussolini

There was also something called the Frankenstein Machine.  Back in the '30's some kid down in Arkansas was playing with his short wave radio and transmitted a signal which killed all cars within several miles.  Some reports claimed that everything electrical quit working while he was transmitting, even light bulbs.  So his effect may or may not have been related to the Bessel Wave Function, which would cause spark plugs to fire constantly.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 26, 2019, 23:49:31 pm
mussolinis wife was in a limo driving down some road and the transmitter when turned on killed all vehicles on the road. all demonstrated in front of Benito Mussolini

that demonstration a few yrs back by usa army used a crowd control weapon shown on 60 minutes or whatever tv show has got to be the same area of rf

it would have to be in the same freq as an engine ignition to be able to kill it. its not the spark plug under attack , its the coil or the core, or maybe chassis earth
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 27, 2019, 02:43:13 am
Bessel Beams probably are a little too complex to provide the simplest solution to the problem; it only takes two out phased cell phone signals to set off a blasting cap.  I like the idea of affecting the chassis, to cancel the spark's ground.  Back then car's used a positive ground, so giving the chassis a negative charge could prevent the plugs from firing.  If it still works today, then it would be something else.  The coil's 'continuous' output would still have to go through the distributor, if there was an output.  So that wouldn't cause pre ignition.  Maybe the transmitted energy was magnetic, if it could override a coil's operation.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 27, 2019, 10:26:16 am
Thats pretty funny stuff...I wish i had such a transmitter....
A nice toy  :) ;)
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 30, 2019, 00:31:44 am
so what?
1930s generally cars had mud guards , gull wing bonnets and a tin can coil bolted to the fire wall.
what field will penetrate the steel body shielding ? 
hum bucker guitar pick ups are all about shielding - (just a thought)
does transmitter find wavelength by reflection?
does it tune into the body as a node point, does wave bounce off the road up into the engine bay?
the earth is a conductor and so is the steel body, 1/4 wave length maybe?
is the car body an aerial or receiving dish?
I dunno
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 30, 2019, 04:05:45 am
If something like a large Rumcorf Coil were used, the car body would act as an antenna, and the rf would capacitively couple to the engine compartment, pulling long white sparks from the polar mass of the ignition coil's windings.  But there would also be sparks in any gaps in the body, something which wasn't reported.  So it could have been some kind of magnetic effect, which is hard to shield with normal techniques.  An ignition coil itself can work as a magnetic transmitter if it's fed with biphasic pulses.  Reflected pulses from the top load hit oncoming pulses, producing floating magnetic splatter flux.  Two of these can be phased to focus the vibrating flux at a distance, or sweep it in that direction.  Normal materials can't shield against it.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 30, 2019, 05:31:04 am
so the material the car is made from = iron , magnetism is likely
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on August 30, 2019, 17:27:36 pm
That vibrating flux can be rather nasty, especially if it includes a high end beat frequency component in the single wire driver circuit, such as water's resonant MW frequency.


Meanwhile, I modified my power supply circuit to make it tunable.  Basically, I moved the diode across the spark gap, which is now connected to a second capacitor.  And another gap for the inductor's output.  This gap represents the load connection points.  The new circuit fires with an 1/8" spark gap.  Before, I had to set it around 1/32".  Using two oven caps, the output spark is a lot fatter than the one across a single gap, and can be stretched like a normal MOT arc.  With a nano Farad cap for C2 the spark in that gap is really thin, like it doesn't hardly have any current. So current can be minimized through component selection.  The first cap, together with the inductor, is a tuned circuit pumped by the cap and diode oscillator.  So changing the values of the first cap and/or the inductor will determine the frequency.  In theory, this will work with just about any voltage, if the gaps are replaced with low value resistors.  I don't have an issue with mixing alternating and direct current.  When the AC switches polarity it's cancelled out, otherwise, it adds to the DC.  So this is a good way to 'intensify' a given potential.  With an opportunity to minimize the amps.  At a desired frequency.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on October 02, 2019, 01:00:57 am
I was allowed to salvage some big SCRs from a refridgerator-sized Power Conditioning Cabinet when I worked as a contract electrician at a chip production plant, where I helped them upgrade their equipment.  This component is rated for 100A at 600V.  Each of these came on a 5" cube shaped heat sink.  The white wire is the gate input and the small red wire is for commutation.  The light dimmer also has an SCR, and when it's gated on, the output can trigger the larger one.  This will allow me to chop the leading edge of an applied sine wave.  To also chop the trailing edge, I'll have to use a higher frequency signal, with a negative-going DC offset (provided by running the dimmer's output through a small LV transformer's secondary, or else, just a battery).  An SCR will turn off when the commutating signal's negative magnitude is greater than that of the positive current which is being conducted.  So this will also work with 12 VDC, in case I want to use a MOT's filament winding as the primary, fed with 12V sliver pulses.  I'll post a schematic showing how to connect the commutating diode when I get it wired up and verify the operation.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on October 07, 2019, 03:33:32 am
Array
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 20, 2020, 23:04:57 pm
hi long time no here, but the transformer will put out 2,000V ac  then if the diode is connected correctly with the capacitor you should get 4,000Volt DC half wave.
 have you any pictures? I am interested as I have got my plasma unit working real well but different to how you have done it i expect.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 20, 2020, 23:08:11 pm
I do have some bigger scr's than that one 500A   are you playing around with resonant circuits?
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 21, 2020, 05:04:11 am
hi long time no here, but the transformer will put out 2,000V ac  then if the diode is connected correctly with the capacitor you should get 4,000Volt DC half wave.
 have you any pictures? I am interested as I have got my plasma unit working real well but different to how you have done it i expect.

Pictures with a ccd camera produce a 'burned' image which doesn't demonstrate a key factor, which is that a Plasmoid is opaque.  If you can see into and through your hydrogen plasma, it's not a Plasmoid.

And the oven cap is designed to be in resonance with the transformer.  What I don't have at this point is a resonant pickup circuit for the fusion energy output.  This would be a loosely wound coil around the spark, with its own (tuning) capacitor.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 21, 2020, 18:25:09 pm
My train of thought was disrupted to some extent back when I was discussing all of this, so I haven't looked at it for a while.  However, by my own definition the MOT circuit isn't producing a Plasmoid, since the spark is transparent.  The circuit is correct, so some parameter needs to be adjusted.  Likely the resistance of the cap's output coil.  Having a continuous Plasmoid is important, but this is still a work in progress.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 26, 2020, 16:21:47 pm
I play around with this type of real plasma and it is NOT HHO is  not a spark generated by high voltage, or an arc.
also not buy induction

the one on the table is my little test unit runs in the blue area wave length of around 430nM

the  main plasma generator is the green  output, running around the 470nM

input mainly water  with and some air and power.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 27, 2020, 03:03:38 am
It looks like you've definitely got some atmospheric pressure plasma.  Are you sure it's not an arc, just with low voltage current?  Or, are you using a corona effect?  Lack of induction would seem to rule out a Magnetron.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 27, 2020, 08:54:44 am
 it is not atmospheric as the   output  could go to 3tons a sq inch and there   other  ways of creating pure plasma with out induction the voltage at present is not that high, the current can be around 20- 30amps at this low input of the water input, as this is at 1/40th . I will soon change the plasma generators power supply that Ii am using at the moment     I can not tell you more more on the project it was just to show you that what can be done.
 using an arc immersed in water it not any thing that could be made into a profitable commercial process.
 this output could also have the temperature massively increased to over 25,000C with  just a little more power.
Title: Re: Plasma Power Supply
Post by: Login to see usernames on January 27, 2020, 17:20:45 pm
OK then.  Sounds like thermal ionization,  And thanks for showing it, even if you want to keep the details to yourself.  Good luck with this.