Ionizationx: a clean environment is a human right!

Stanley Meyer => Stan Meyers system 1 => Topic started by: sebosfato on December 12, 2009, 17:38:08 pm

Title: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 12, 2009, 17:38:08 pm
Guys do you know how the quenching circuit work ?

Is because it higher the speed of the gas output higher than the burning speed of the hydrogen. Stan said 350cm second 
So you just calculate from the amount of gas that must pass tru it and the pressure and orifice to know the speed it will flow into the tubes. Whenever the speed is small than that you are in trouble so you must calculate a minimum amount you would need to idle and than you just produce more and at a higher pressure whenever you need remember the cell produces its own pressure so no losses with pumps. The only thing you need is the solenoid to control gas input in the motor. another thing to consider is that you must remain at a pressure level that hydrogen wont explode.
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 12, 2009, 18:36:42 pm
Watch the New Zealand Video and the Colorado Video, he explains it clearly.

This is simple stuff.

The Quenching Circuit is a 0.015" to 0.025" hole, or smaller, and because of this small passageway and the 19% Ambient Air (mostly Nitrogen) mixed in with the Hydrogen and Oxygen, the Nitrogen simply gets in between the Hydrogen and Oxygen and stops them from burning, they MUST touch each other to burn, and the small passageway simply stops the H from reaching the O because the N gets in the way.

They need to be at least 1/8" and work irregardless of Gas Pressure and Gas Volume.

If you dilute the H and O gas even more, by adding more non-combustible gases, then you can increase the hole size greater than 0.025"
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 13:43:32 pm
Donaldwfc whenever you have a reduction in the size of the tubes you automatically need more pressure to pass the required amount of gas thru it all i'm saying is that the back flash don't happens because of the high speed the gas is traveling greater than the speed of burning. Of course if you dilute the gas with non combustible gasses you need less smaller holes because the speed of burning is lower so they can flow more slowly with no problem.We are dealing with at least 0,5 liter per second of gas up to 2,5 liters per second to run a car. Is like litz wire principle...
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 19:31:07 pm
Donald is right sebosfato.The speed of the flow of gas has nothing to do with it not flashing back.The flashback can't happen if the passage ways are les then .025 inches.No matter has slow it flows.The hydrogen can't burn until the oxygen molecule is close enough.With the small quenct tube ID,you get trapped air between the hydrogen and oxygen molecules,so it won't burn untill both exit the tube.Stan states this at any pressure or flow rate.
Don
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 19:39:28 pm
Do you agree whenever you want to pass 2,5 liters of gas per second you will need larger tubes ? I'm just proposing a mathematical thinking way to be able to adapt to any application.
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 19:45:49 pm
I disagree.

When you want to pass more gas, you use more quenching circuits, for example, here is Stan's quenching tube, it has 30 quenching circuits and can pass enough gas to run the 1500 cc VW dune buggy engine.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/_ICT0050.jpg)

And here is a picture of my quenching circuits, Alumina Tubes

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/Picture13-1.png)
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 19:51:57 pm
Yes,your point is correct,you will need to increase pressure to get the same flow output of a smaller tube to match the output flow of the larger tube.But no you won't need a larger tube to get the 2.5 litres/second,you just need more of the same smaller tubes to get more flow.Same orfice size,but more passages.The tube Stan used had 30 passages I think.
Don
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 20:05:48 pm
thats what i'm talking about

the min size second my thoughts of each tube can be bigger depending on the pressure because you have higher speed because of the pressure do you understand my point?
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 20:09:35 pm
thats what i'm talking about

the min size in my thoughts of each tube can be bigger depending on the pressure because you have anyway higher speed because of the pressure do you understand my point?
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 20:44:22 pm


I believed the ceramic alumina material was absorbing all the heat from the flashback flame so it died before it reached the cell.
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 21:32:27 pm
If you have too low a pressure your flame will melt your nozzle.
The non-combustible gasses, ie Nitrogen, mixed with the gas, lifts the flame up above the nozzle so it wont melt.
Alumina has a melting point around 3000 degrees F, and the flame can reach 5000 degrees F, or over 20,000 degrees with the Hydrogen Fracturing Process.
Alumina was chosen because of the high melting temperature and that the holes will maintain their size and shape, whereas brass, copper, and so on will erode and widen the hole after some use.
The quenching tube is for safe transportation of the gas, not to act as a nozzle.

Stan says all of this clearly, if you want to understand him, you should listen to him :)
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 22:05:39 pm
If you make a experimentation like inducing a flash back with the gas being sucked from the cell not pumped by it you will see than that it will explode because the speed of the gas will be too slow. How do you explain this? did you tried or can check this?
Thats why i believe it have to do with the speed of the traveling gas.

Where did you bought this alumina stuff?
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 13, 2009, 22:53:14 pm
the flame can not travel back through the quenching tube with the recomended size of .015-.025 inch period.It can not go through the small passage way.No matter what the speed or pressure.If it's under vacuum,than nothing can burn in that enviorment.
Don
Title: Re: Quenching circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on December 14, 2009, 01:15:05 am
stan also mentions that with the quenching circuit he also has non combustable gasses in the lines and the gasses will seperate meaning you will have clumps of hydrogen and oxygen and u will have clumps of carbon...  so if there were a flash back then it is interupted by a gap of non combustable...

he mentions that when you produce they hydrogen and oxygen from water there is also non combustable gases that are being released.