Author Topic: The Right Question?  (Read 30946 times)

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #56 on: December 14, 2015, 02:23:47 am »
thoght for later

increasing the capacitance increase the force per applied voltage ...

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In the mood
« Reply #57 on: December 14, 2015, 18:16:44 pm »
today i woke up in the right mood... made tons of tests... and pushed up to 15kv to water...

today i worked from 7 to 0 ppm... no single bubble...

i used 4  microwave diodes 4 cells... and 1 diode in the closed loop... 1 transformer... and 1set of 60xpke400v tvs diodes arranged in series to give 24kv burnless diode to test with too.

Please notice that this does not light the lamp and dc is pretty dangerous! the cell stay charged when the probes arenot connected to it! Lot of Dangerous! please dont do this if youare not expert with high voltage!

good news are

the computer and labview work stable now with the new grounded ac wall plugs working ballanced.. it dont blinks anymore...

the probes work quite nice with the digital ocilloscope, but i found that the differential probe calibration is not zero as i wish.. and it has a small delay for the measurement.. i will try to find out how to zero up this as without it being zero at bothe probes at high voltages at same potential  the probes than its worthless... just an isolated (not so isolated) probe...

but my guess is that there may be a way to zero it up... at lower voltge is zero...

anyway very nice test and bad results...
« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 19:12:31 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #58 on: December 14, 2015, 18:47:53 pm »

Hi
consider any day where you dont fry your probe , a GOOD day  ;)

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #59 on: December 14, 2015, 19:15:05 pm »

Hi
consider any day where you dont fry your probe , a GOOD day  ;)

=D good point... i wont fry it... i hope (lol) im using it as it should i guess... i used the voltage max measurement on the digital oscilloscope to see that it is in a secure region of operation and use both probes at same time so one gives the indication when doing the differential measurement with the other... 


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Check this
« Reply #60 on: December 16, 2015, 13:34:30 pm »
The average thermal energy at temperatures within water's liquid range (given by RT ) is sufficiently large to dominate the movement of ions even in the presence of an applied electric field. This means that the ions, together with the water molecules surrounding them, are engaged in a wild dance as they are buffeted about by thermal motions

http://www.chem1.com/acad/webtext/solut/solut-7.html

https://br.comsol.com/multiphysics/what-is-ionic-migration
« Last Edit: December 16, 2015, 15:18:54 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #61 on: December 16, 2015, 20:38:21 pm »

myself , I dont have much faith in scientist / qualified people .
people get qualifications with the fundamental goal of getting a high paying job .

In order to secure a future that will give them a certain quality of life they will adhere to what ever their master wants from them and say what ever is required.

chem1.com also say it is impossible to run a car on water

http://www.chem1.com/CQ/

the other , ion migration article is based on modeling and simulations  ,  I seriously doubt they have hands on experience like the people on this site



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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #62 on: December 16, 2015, 21:11:07 pm »
yeah... they criticize it but whoever wrote that didnt or could not considered what meyer did so i dont blame them either.

The thing about migration is very interesting... it shows that electric fields can set up ions in moevement... like i´m tryin to describe...

i´m sayin is that if we provide the right circuitry the key is the water fuel cell will be an electric generator. An electric generator that also generates gas as a consequence of the process.. And uses high voltage fields to be set up in generation mode.

When we achieve the threshold of ionization of water the water will get ionized causing a current peak... this current in my point of view could be the amps meyer meant to extract from the system...

meyer dont seem to apply any voltage difference across the water....

The vic when arreanged with two coils in series not part of the same core the coils will double the frequency of the applied high voltage pulse while trying to maintaining the charging current in one direction, this makes the life of the diode easier in the sense that the reversal piv will be smaller and controllable.. .

for example if we pulse the cell with chokes in series (meyer diagram) if the pulse entering the chokes is during pulse on than the chokes will charge up and allow the cell to gradually charge untill the current start to decrease. (cell chared).. at this point the choke has some constant current due to leakage of water..current stabilized ... now if we terminate the pulse the secondary will revert its polarity and the chokes must compensate for this polarity reversal for keep the current at the same magnitude... so for this the magnetic field of this coils must collapse.. and it will  revert its voltage sending a second pulse to the water...

as it want to discharge back into the secondary the primary will develop a proportional voltage across it..remember this voltage will want to kill the mosfet so must be dissipated with resistor across the primary (and diode in series with it) this ocuring durring pulse off

now if the phase where oposed its mostly the same except that this pulse going back into the secondary will want to charge the battery or capacitor existing across the primary so creating a voltage that is greater than the source voltage during pulse on... impeeding the current flow... or if allowed recharging the battery ... this occuring during pulse on

if recharing back the batery or capacitor is important to have a diode acrosss the switch... to impeed reverse current on them as they are normaly unidirectional too... must be a fast diode

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #63 on: December 17, 2015, 01:58:56 am »
Dear TGS

The probe i placed between ground and cell inner electrode...so just high voltage potential

the cells were connected in series

my vic has in this test 600 turns 10 layers... secondary plus 33 turns choke and the primary has 20turns..

the primary is allowed to collapse up to 800v... and has 500ohm 50W resistor with a fan and varistors 380v across is too

that is the first test to chek the high voltage going to the cell and check if both high voltage probes indicate similar voltages..

there is only 4 hv diodes going to the 4 cell inner electrode connected in this case by the secondary and choke in series with fields aiding... to ground... no negative to the cell...

the voltages went up to 15kv peak remaining around 7,5kvrms between pulses dc with about 24 v applied to the primary... when the cell had 0ppm

when it had 7pmm it went down to 5kv or so max voltage

in this case the primary was pulsed and when the pulse terminate the pulse goes to the cell...

i´m using a 10ohm resistor between the secondary and ground and monitoring the signal input together with the current going into the secondary into the analog osciloscope and using the input signal as the ext trig of the digital oscilloscope where both the high voltage probes are connected to.


basicaly at primary the voltage is ´peaking at 600v since there is up to 1 amp going into it and the tranformation factor is 30 so there is 15kv on the output or so...

on lower freq it can get up to 2,5 amps
« Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 05:24:23 am by sebosfato »