Author Topic: The Right Question?  (Read 30947 times)

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #128 on: January 31, 2016, 09:11:31 am »

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what could be regarded as a microcapacitor?
« Reply #129 on: January 31, 2016, 13:27:52 pm »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colloid

http://sciencewatch.com/nobel/predictions/titanium-dioxide-photocatalysis

pure water is a dielectric

tap water have ions

a capacitor is not former by ions or only dielectric

it takes metalic plates to get charge on...

water is the plates or is the dielectric in this case in your opinion?

i mean we could suspend a dielectric within water that has a dielectric from 1 to 3000 or metalic particles... what would do what?

to have a spark on oil you need it to be dirty
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 14:00:56 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #130 on: January 31, 2016, 19:36:44 pm »
from what i understand the ions in the water are distributed equidistant from one another giving a net electric field of zero although there is around 25kv/mm holding them to each other at 1nm distance or so...

so if we dont apply a voltage difference greater than this it wont do a thing to the matrix other than make the dual layer absorbed ions do discharge at the respective electrodes...

if you get a bubble in a dielectric its said that the bubble will create a high electric field zone... this is because it will have a dielectric constant smaller than that of the dielectric observed.

bubbles can carry charge away also because of that... but only to the point where the cell is so positive that it will not allow more charges to go....  you need to provide for charges to make it keep carrying charge away if we wanted an ionized gas stream for ex...

this tell me that if maybe water had some kind of electrolyte that could act not as an ion but as metalic neutral points in the water this could maybe neutralize the ions as for the metalic would take both ions and glue on.. forming dipoles...  since its dielectric is much greater than the water... this dipoles would be much harder to break than water if in nano scale

basically instead of a matrix of ions it would become a matrix of dipoles formed by the ions and the metalic nano particles...

so as you see if we add sand or something it will alter the charateritics.. maybe some nanopowder..

the benefit i see is that now the matrix get very relaxed the dipoles will make company to the rotation of the water dipoles and it will create a cooperative action in this case allowing the bulk water to become more alligned.. also i think that maybe the metalic particles are able to be a donor and receptor of electrons to get the molecules of more bulk to have a surface to interact...
















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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #131 on: January 31, 2016, 22:41:57 pm »

catalytic converters on cars use platinum, if your looking for some thing to play with

maybe a dumped car will still have the CC on it ....but chances are it will be missing ... for scrap value

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #132 on: February 01, 2016, 11:51:24 am »
Yes man the catalyser has rodium and palladium also... in youtube is easy to learn how to extract...

i have here platinum in liquid form already in the form of hexacloroplatinic acid and also palladium chloride.. i bought all this for another project.. i yet have a palladium electrode (6grams) foil for plating it... but i didnt got the platinum electrode required for plating it  the money ended hahah...

the chemicals are siting on the lab... not used yet for years... i had to use the licence from the university  to get access  to this... is restricted material and so to buy it i had to buy it like if it was for the university... lot of work to get it..

it was very hard learning all the electrochemistry formulas to be able to create the plating solution... i get many types of acids and bases here because of that.,.. also ph meter and termometer...

as i could not find enought info to use the platinum correctly i didnt used it.. there is some 12grams of platinum if i recall well

wish someone pops up with some help on that

i was looking into sea water content just this morning

check this ions in sea water

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_ions_in_aqueous_solution

Meyer said sea water could be used...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molecular_orbital_diagram
« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 16:07:27 pm by sebosfato »


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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #134 on: February 01, 2016, 17:57:18 pm »
I've read that lead dioxide works as well as platinum.  It's the red stuff in the car battery plates.  You Tube shows it's easy to plate it onto a carbon rod, treated with nitric acid.  But if you get the carbon from a flashlight battery, be aware that the manganese oxide is nasty stuff and can cause kidney failure.

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Re: The Right Question?
« Reply #135 on: February 01, 2016, 18:17:48 pm »
I've read that lead dioxide works as well as platinum.  It's the red stuff in the car battery plates.  You Tube shows it's easy to plate it onto a carbon rod, treated with nitric acid.  But if you get the carbon from a flashlight battery, be aware that the manganese oxide is nasty stuff and can cause kidney failure.

wow thats nice... i tried to plate over stainless steel... but it didnt worked as stainless steel has a layer of oxygen and it does not glue on... so i made a treatment to the plates with nickel stricke material this way i could get the palladium on it... but as i could not get pue platinum foil as was too expensive i didnt proceeded.. the palladium foil costed at the time 200$ 6g... platinum was over twice the price...but not only that platinum have more mass than palladium per volume... so fo a decent foil it would need more than just twice the grams ... this is very interesting,,,,

my intention was to create a um layer on the plates,... the plates were 30 cuted in laser and have a copper termination soldered with silver soldering... than treated with nickell

this project is stop until i find someone who know very well about chemistry and maybe give a help with platinum foils... for now i´m out of money to play like that..

i wont try using batery, but thanks for the advice man i didnt knew it was so so dangerous!

i dont even have the proper safe equipment... is very dangerous dealing with pure amonia hydroxide and HCL ... i have saw how danger it can be but i stoped this project when i broken my hand and could not make it properly for 3 months  because of that than my life turned all around... and i had to get back to the old idea!

Probably would be better some other type of material as the base... but i got stainless steel because this project was together with an inventor here in brazil who i worked with... in the willing to put his device out that we expend all this money.. around 20,000 reais went into it.. back in 2012 around 10k$ i had a friend who helped me to get the money together... but the old man didnt knew how to plate the chemicals than i had to find out but when i did it money was already gone and the old man went to another country to go on with another project.. so i gave up on this and got my CC cores and some neodimium magnets back so i could use in my reasearch...

i also read that lead act as a catalyser too.. there are others too but platinum and palladium have specific afinities and that was the point of the project...

manganese and barium oxides also can form polar electrodes...