Author Topic: The Dc resonant transformer  (Read 26661 times)

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #88 on: January 18, 2014, 10:43:58 am »
good idea.. I'm planing to buy a current probe for my oscilloscope to try measuring it properly... and maybe a good multimeter... i was also considering get a digital oscilloscope but i have no money for this now. Anyway i think the knowledge coming out of this experiments is priceless. 

Now i have understood more profoundly how the interaction of electric and magnetic field. 

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #89 on: January 19, 2014, 17:52:55 pm »
New tests today

today i was pushing the system harder when i hear a noise like of something popping off and immediately the load wave form changed completely to another waveform and the voltage seems to have increased somehow... somehow now i can put the all 150v the variac has to apply ... and so i decided to change the load back to that 100w lamp  and it lit up \...

certainly some component burned up and allowed this to happen, now i get to find which diode blew...

i'm amazed with that. now i also have to measure how much power in and out anyway ... but is the greatest load i had working..!! the secondary is being connected to the feedback winding forming a bucking voltage so the applied voltage is lower.. but in turn forms the feedback circuit that sends a positive pulse to the other core so they can like talk together.. int his amplifier arrangement.

This feedback works like this in my imagination...

The primary induces say 100v into 100 turns so it induces 1v per turn

now if you add a feedback winding that apply another 100v to 10turns than the amount of induction comes to 11v per turn

the feedback occurs when this 11v per turn now induces instead of 100v  at the secondary  but 1100v to the secondary coil which is sending the feed back to the feedback coil and this if you consider infinitesimal amount of time can happen at the speed of light many many many times since this cycle starts till a point.     

Maybe is simpler than we ever thought was possible.


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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #90 on: January 19, 2014, 19:32:56 pm »
which diode blew? can you show how you make the connections for the coils?
« Last Edit: January 19, 2014, 21:14:20 pm by geon »

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #91 on: January 19, 2014, 23:15:02 pm »
I'm not sure what happen exacty… i pushed the system further and the fuse and transistor died again...… the coils are connected exactly like the drawing of the two toroids… but but theres no feedback output coil on the second core the secondary is connected to the load directly thru the feedback coil in the 1 core… so the voltage of the secondary gets subtracted from the induced voltage (induced by the primary0 in the feedback coil.. buck


theres also a non dissipative snubber coil wound over the primary…. that sends the kick back pulse to the source and discharge the non dissipative snubber capacitor inducing in the primary and the rest of the circuit a high voltage for an instant. that probably burned the diode that is in series with the primary to allow the pulse collapse… if the snubber winding discharge into the primary it the primary has to send back to the source (huge capacitor) part of the energy… 

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #92 on: January 20, 2014, 00:29:47 am »
heres the updated
 diagram…

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2817.0;attach=13245;image)


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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #93 on: January 20, 2014, 08:27:35 am »
i just had an idea…

what about using a capacitor changing electric field to generate energy.

If a manner to extract energy from the capacitor while its charging making the capacitance seems bigger during charging because of that action than maybe energy could be generated.

I imagined the follow

I toroidal core is placed in the middle of 2 capacitor plates having the same format of the core separated by a dielectric. than a coil is wound in the toroid…

If the coil is connected to a load the capacitor is not going to be so free to change the electric field for an applied charge somehow….

another construction could be a toroidal CC core having a rolled capacitor… if the direction of the coil is correct there should be a voltage induce in a secondary at the same core…

The capacitor acts as a capacitot but also as a coil so the changing electric field of the capacitor generates a magnetic field that helps the circuit… if the direction is not correct it should make it worse instead of helping….


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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #94 on: January 20, 2014, 12:26:37 pm »
displacement current is too small to make any difference, half the energy of the cap is always wasted to radiation and heat during charging

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Re: The Dc resonant transformer
« Reply #95 on: January 20, 2014, 13:39:47 pm »
displacement current is too small to make any difference, half the energy of the cap is always wasted to radiation and heat during charging

Thats not exactly true… when you have an inductor connected between 2 capacitors one charged and the other not, the energy lost on the transfer between both is basically the resistance loss in the coil and leakage in the capacitor… thats because the coil don't allow for high current at the start and it also creates a kind of inertia that allows the charge to reverse the voltage f the capacitor.

If you connect a charged capacitor to another equal capacitor half the energy disappear… because when the voltage get to the half the other capacity don't receive charge anymore and if it receive it ant to immediately give it back to the other capacitor… thats why associating caps and coils is so damn important…

The displacement current would be that small If the voltage in the capacitor is something like 100kv  and the frequency maybe 1MHz and the current fling maybe 100 amps?

My guess is the more you push those parameters the greater is going to be the displacement current… the beauty is that from my point of view this is a manner to use the magnetic field induction caused by of a capacitor to change its own value of capacitance durig operation… making it a parametric generating device…

Can you imagine a core having a layer of strontium titanate?