Author Topic: electric field screening  (Read 16058 times)

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Indupacitor
« Reply #56 on: July 28, 2013, 22:36:38 pm »
The inner tube must have amp restricting coil too otherwise the plates leaks electrons to the water...

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #57 on: July 28, 2013, 22:45:25 pm »
what if you have two plates with only water in between and not around?
Could you not then use coils outside?

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #58 on: July 28, 2013, 23:35:09 pm »
what if you have two plates with only water in between and not around?
Could you not then use coils outside?

Yes Steve this is exactly the thing i'm doing!

The water is going to stay only in the region between the inner and outer tube...

i decided to make this way because is easier to make the coils...

Theres going to be one coil outside of the outer tube and one inside of the inner tube!  Fields adding each other!!!

This forms the so called voltage zones...
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 06:47:29 am by sebosfato »

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?????????
« Reply #59 on: July 30, 2013, 10:14:20 am »
 8) 8) 8) 8)

I'm using 30 awg wire and planing to make more than 10 layers

I found a fundamental relation between this geometry and tesla coil. Tesla talked about undamped oscillations... this kind of geometry where the capacitance field lines pass thru the inductor in my point of view is pretty much different than the situation where there is a capacitor and inductor simply electrically connected... since the coil becomes part of the capacitance and must have electric fields in the dielectric coating of the coils.

« Last Edit: July 30, 2013, 10:40:16 am by sebosfato »

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #60 on: July 30, 2013, 10:42:01 am »
I can read that you have fun Fabio  :)
Use the tubes as core is fine.
But what kind of material is your tube?
Try to use soft iron or ss430, which has ferro in it.
I have plenty of the magnetic Ss400 serie plates here, so if you need plates, just ask and it will be on its way to south america... 8)

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #61 on: July 30, 2013, 11:10:33 am »
I really think that this ferritic tubes could be much better!!!  Another great improvement could be to have a cut all the way in the tube so that it don't form a short turn....   to the coils
 
Look at my outer tube voltage zone prototype

i just measured 74uf indeed really really high... !!!!! between the aluminum foil and the tube having between a coil with insulation tape on each layer.




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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #62 on: July 30, 2013, 11:16:10 am »
Didnt you measure current leakage? 47uf is hugh for such a little one

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #63 on: July 30, 2013, 11:27:13 am »
Didnt you measure current leakage? 47uf is hugh for such a little one

Yes this capacitance is really high but i guess it can be some interference in the reading since its a lrc meter which uses frequency to measure... and this is not a simple capacitor but an equivalent of a capacitor in almost parallel but also in series with a capacitor....with only one plastic layer insulation tape and a tube the capacitance should still somehow  small...

i don't know but i was hoping that is exactly what i need... an equivalent to high dielectric constants...

just measured again and the test used is DC method.. same result...