Author Topic: electric field screening  (Read 15839 times)

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electric field screening
« on: May 29, 2013, 05:41:26 am »
well although so much misinformation around what meyer really did i think a good starting point is to understand why he said the things he said and how to find the info he had to work with...

i came up with a theory that says that is indeed possible to generate hydrogen and oxygen from water while still generating tremendous amount of electrical energy if required..

to achieve that is necessary to understand what is the electric field between ions in water solution.

The reason is simple:

Is impossible to have acceleration if the forces are in balance... so a greater electric field must be applied otherwise nothing happens...  (no observable results appear.


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Tay Hee Han
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2013, 14:31:17 pm »
Tay Hee Han Patent may be the solution to our prayers...

The he clearly talks about disrupting the forces of water covalent bounding by applying high electric fields but restricting amps using a ceramic material that has high dielectric constant!

As a dielectric is a insulator to the flow of amps but a high dielectric conducts well electric fields! Remembering the current thru a resistor is proportional to the electric field in that resistor and it dissipates power, thereto there is a raise in heat generated to some degree to be expected. This is power loss in the circuit. The ceramics get hot and must handle it.

Now coming from that point of view of how to inhibit the amp flow, there must be a way of using a circuit to create this effect?

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2013, 14:54:06 pm »
which leads me to a question ???

Meyer used a complex of composes to restrict the amps as he described in one of his patents as a sandwich of resistive elements...

what if it was his turn around the need for dielectrics?

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2013, 17:33:07 pm »
which leads me to a question ???

Meyer used a complex of composes to restrict the amps as he described in one of his patents as a sandwich of resistive elements...

what if it was his turn around the need for dielectrics?

Yes. Good questions here.
Its in his patents, but not found anywhere in his legacy.
Don didnt find anything like that.
But maybe it was just a clear coating?



 

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2013, 18:34:42 pm »
we know he indeed used lot of plastics and talks about insulated cavity all the time...

The tay hee patent is very interesting because it was cited by meyer in some of his patents... so he clearly indicated that this is the prior art to the things he did... why would he show something like that?

why?

He was very smart in my opinion...


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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2013, 14:13:33 pm »
My quick 2 cents worth here - I looked at the Han patent, amongst others, a few years ago (waterfuelcell org AU) but it took a while to connect the dots...

Stainless Steel forms a very very thin Chromium Oxide dielectric layer (thats what makes it stainless) - the thinner the better, refer to semiconductor physics for more information. ALSO, Dr Pollack, University of Washington, has an excellent 1 hour presentation that is well worth the time spent viewing it several times. AND, high voltage "arc over" has a "hold-off time," it doesn't happen instantaneously. BUT, getting it all just right is a bit of a task to say the least. HOWEVER, nearly anyone can make anything work at least once; the trick is to make it happen reliably every time over the spectrum of environmental and other changes.

THEREFORE, Mr. Meyer may have progressed to his "water spark plug injector" to ease the tuning and eliminate some of the variables.

Have a good one!

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2013, 15:12:52 pm »
Id like to share my thoughts what if you form a capacitor using water and a higher constant dielectric at the center for more dense electric field lines if u want and connect this water capacitor to a "cold energy" circuit that means no sparks inside water area instead build a tube with nitrogen gas seperate and connect the capacitor in this circuit with the tube ... if excess energy coming from spark discharge is stored inside the circuit then it will eventually destroy the circuit or destroy the material of the circuit with the lower dielectric strength and that should be water.  also water absorbs very high frequencies from what I know.. it won't work with materials that dont absorb very high frequencies.. the only tricky part is getting the circuit right
« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 16:01:45 pm by geon »

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Re: electric field screening
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2013, 07:43:17 am »
Good questions!

Well my first guess is that if the dielectric is at the middle than the waters has no connection to each other than the dielectric,,,
The problem could be the contact of the electrode to the water which mean that it can exchange charge with the water.. interesting,,,