Author Topic: Stan's Resonant Frequency  (Read 40182 times)

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2011, 17:15:38 pm »
The cold fusion reaction is accomplished in the same way but using heavy water... when the palladium lattice get loaded with the deuterium ions but get discharged all in once the deuterium would fuse liberating He+ Deuterium+ and a hell of heat and electricity. As the hydrogen don't have neutrons when it get destabilized it don't create the other specimen but should get out of the reaction as H+ gaseous destabilized... The deuterium inside the palladium is also bigger to get out and heavier so it develop a great temperature and fuses.


Is not the first time i think of this. Seem to explain the results.




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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #25 on: January 03, 2011, 19:50:12 pm »
Here is a better schematic of Stan's Electrical Polarization circuit (8XA).
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/8XA_component_values_complete_circuit.jpg)

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2011, 19:58:46 pm »
Just for clarification, That is the waveform you see even with the diode? And you are getting gases from the measured waveform?

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #27 on: January 03, 2011, 20:08:58 pm »
Just for clarification, That is the waveform you see even with the diode? And you are getting gases from the measured waveform?

Yes sir that is correct. The reason Stan has a diode in there is to keep the current in one direction and to keep the secondary from shorting out. In DC current travels in one direction and in AC its bidirectional. This is the tricky part about this LCL configuration, when you have an Inductor-Capacitor-Inductor configuration this causes an oscillation between the inductors and u will have an AC signal and bidirectional current. Just as Stan says in one of his patents the diode is to keep the secondary from shorting and keep the current in one direction.

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2011, 20:16:43 pm »
Very interesting! Thank you Tony! Are you sure the chokes are measured @ 2H each? That number represents a mighty large coil even if both together measured 2H. Maybe 2mH perhaps?

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2011, 20:27:35 pm »
Yea I measured them with my meter and they are 2H each. I made them from an old microwave transformers secondary windings.

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2011, 20:45:03 pm »
Ah! OK, I see! This is all so very interesting. Thanks again for answering my questions. Do you have any other plans to test in the near future? I am curious as to how various coil configurations will affect this circuit.

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2011, 20:59:52 pm »
yea im currently working on the complete circuit with the PLL. Heres a video of the resonant signal.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzcGiih8JVQ