Author Topic: unipolar pulse trains  (Read 81589 times)

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #40 on: November 02, 2008, 19:11:13 pm »
spike i have no idea about any of that information to fill in those equations i have seen that equation already but have no use for it thank you anyways i think i am going out to home depot/radio shack for an inductance meter right now......

i am almost positive that the transformer winding is what makes this a parallel lc circuit allowing potential energy to ascend towards infiniti......my setup right now is a step charging series bifilar lc circuit.....i know why my watts were lost......my series lc circuit maximes current and minimizes  voltage since impedance is zero but the bifilar coil resists voltage.....it' is lost in the magnetic field........now that i can see the parallel lc circuit with the transformers secondary........it all makes perfect sense........so first we get the resonant frequency of the capcitor and the secondary transformer (inductor) then voltage is towards infiniti while current goes to zero.....but current won't necessarily go that close to zero due to electronic equipment.....thus hte bifilar coil comes into play and acts as a resistor through magnetic fields........furthering the voltage......and now that i understand the parallel lc circuit being the secondary transformer and the water capcitor i might be able to get rid of my bridge recitifier since stanleys diode and resonant charging chokes might actually produce the double pulse.......


SEE THIS ENTIRE TIME I WAS THINKING THE INDUCTOR THAT MAKES ALL THIS WORK IS IN THE RESONANT CHARGING CHOKES......WHEN IN FACT IT'S THE ENTIRE VIC......THE SECONDARY IS A PART OF THE COMPLETE SYSTEM......THE SECONDARY IS PROBABLLY THE MOST IMPORTANT PART......the transformer has to resonate....

Great research Kinesis  :)



« Last Edit: November 02, 2008, 22:33:45 pm by dankie »

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2008, 22:03:13 pm »
If it doesnt work with a diode its not meyers , its true that it is lc and will have a resonant freq  but it is bi-polar ..... bipolar in different time phase.... no polarization ..... no production......... its simple..... very simple........................................... .......................



hahah a diode makes it unipolar get out your oscope and multimeter.....the more hands on you get the less all those what if's and i think so's become.........nice try though.

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2008, 22:12:38 pm »
If it doesnt work with a diode its not meyers , its true that it is lc and will have a resonant freq  but it is bi-polar ..... bipolar in different time phase.... no polarization ..... no production......... its simple..... very simple........................................... .......................



hahah a diode makes it unipolar get out your oscope and multimeter.....the more hands on you get the less all those what if's and i think so's become.........nice try though.

 a diode makes it unipolar.... yes....





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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2008, 22:24:03 pm »
you talk of bi polar......bi polar over what......if bi polar is going across your cell nothing is going to happen.......it only charges in one direction........and if you understand rlc circuits then you will realize that an inductor in series with a capcitor is a resonant charging circuit which PRODUCES HIGH CURRENT AT RESONANCE SINCE IMPEDANCE DROPS TOWARDS ZERO.....IMPEDANCE MEANING RESISTANCE AND IF THERE IS NO RESISTANCE THEN CURRENT IS THE PRIME KEY FACTOR HERE.......SO THEN HUGE LODS OF CURRENT ARE BEING DUMPED INTO THE CELL......

now in a parallel rlc circuit......at resonance impedance is towards infiniti meaning current is towards zero leaving voltage towards infinity......thus dropping high voltage into a capcitor....a capcitor stores voltage..........not current......


I HAVE BEEN TRYING AND TRYING........please tell me what you have done to get 40,000 volts......no better yet how about you get 1 kilovolt........i have done the math behind this and the only factor i am not including is the impedance and inductance of my secondary WHICH IS A PART OF THE VIC.

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2008, 22:32:43 pm »
you talk of bi polar......bi polar over what......if bi polar is going across your cell nothing is going to happen.......it only charges in one direction........and if you understand rlc circuits then you will realize that an inductor in series with a capcitor is a resonant charging circuit which PRODUCES HIGH CURRENT AT RESONANCE SINCE IMPEDANCE DROPS TOWARDS ZERO.....IMPEDANCE MEANING RESISTANCE AND IF THERE IS NO RESISTANCE THEN CURRENT IS THE PRIME KEY FACTOR HERE.......SO THEN HUGE LODS OF CURRENT ARE BEING DUMPED INTO THE CELL......

now in a parallel rlc circuit......at resonance impedance is towards infiniti meaning current is towards zero leaving voltage towards infinity......thus dropping high voltage into a capcitor....a capcitor stores voltage..........not current......


I HAVE BEEN TRYING AND TRYING........please tell me what you have done to get 40,000 volts......no better yet how about you get 1 kilovolt........i have done the math behind this and the only factor i am not including is the impedance and inductance of my secondary WHICH IS A PART OF THE VIC.

Correct! thats exactly what i'm saying , bi-polar (no diode ).....

sorry for being mean i will delete my post

Dont mistake this with bi-polar in same time phase tho ,

http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,687.0.html

Keep it up the research .

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #45 on: November 03, 2008, 07:07:05 am »
agh i keep coming back to parallel over and over.....series doesn't do much of anything as meyers concepts provide......

here is a video on parallel resonance of lc circuits....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Xefg-EfC4Q


i know what the patents says but i just can't seem to quite get this in his terms.

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #46 on: November 03, 2008, 07:58:31 am »
alright so more and more and the never ending amount of reading i take in......i have depleted google and yahoo......so i have come up with this next idea to hold me through......alright so a series lc circuit like stan had at resonance has an impedance of zero......resistance of zero.....current is at it's highest.....but with no impedance the circuit wants to short circuit....as stan had said he places a diode to stop short circuiting adn to direct the release of the stored current towards the capacitor.....so now with the on pulse of the 50 percent duty cycle going into the inductor it buils up a magnetic field and current is at it's highest point in the lc circuit system.....then on the off pulse the current is released towards the capcitor becuase of the diode and is converted from the kinetic state to the potential state exactly like a parallel circuit works......and it repeats over and over without the capcitor discahrging itself until the pulse train ends........

i just hope this will atually work....i have been trying this already non stop but it never seems to want to work this way.....i can achieve the basic alternator way with a solid state setup running through a diode bridge and bifilar coil with voltage amplitude control......i have purchased an inductance meter to help me achieve my calculations easier.....trying to measure inducatnace with a resistor and sine wave is a bitch......i will get this high voltage to work....i feel it.

but as for now resonance can suck my inductance.

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Re: unipolar pulse trains
« Reply #47 on: November 03, 2008, 17:37:24 pm »
hey guys, i have some time to visit this forum again and want to let you know about my opinion. I have stopped experimenting because i got much work to do, college started again (studying electrical engineering) and thus i had to revise some stuff, complex impedances etc.

First of all:
A resonant series circuit is used to get high voltage from relatively small voltage. It will NOT raise current at the capacitor, only raise the maximum current on the lc-circuit. it is the voltage which is raised on the reactive parts.
One source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LC_circuit#Applications_of_resonance_effect
Quote: "A series resonant circuit provides voltage magnification."

After studying the tesla patent for the bifilar coil it's clear where i made a mistake when i tested my cell. The bifilar coil is not wound bifilar to create opposing magnetic fields thus minimizing the inductance, it's there to raise the inductance and because of that creating a very high voltage pulse (after lenz's law) which also lowers current.
They use this technique with neon lamps, they do not want to use a high ohm resistance, because the thermal energy losses (heat) would be to big, so they use a coil with a high inductive resistance when run on alternating current which will limit current without energy losses.
You must connect the bifilar coil like Jnaudin did or tesla, not as stated in D14.pdf!

If everything is done right there is no need for a coating really, because of the very little current at the capacitor.


Alltogether: Pulsed DC (acts like ac on coils etc. but witht he advantage that it's only working in one direction), conventional transformer to step up voltage by the factor 3 (stated in patent), series circuit to get a highly magnified voltage with the right quality of the circuit and the bifilar coil creating a high voltage potential when connected the right way.
=> low input power, high output voltage, low output current



it's not so hard at all, but after several reports i don't believe really that a voltage field will split atom bindings. maybe i'll have time to build the thing again and i'll see..