Author Topic: Aussepom goes magnetic  (Read 19081 times)

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2010, 14:44:35 pm »
hi there
                       not to my knowledge, this is my own design, using gathered knowledge, this was sketched out over 5 or 6 years ago, revised again around 2  1/2 yrs ago when i was looking for alternative power option for my proceses, I when ito it but at the time the cost was way out of my pocket, so I went down the road of the plasma generation.
I have been aske to look into this for  well lets say a 'client',  his project was dead, so I am sugesting one of my own designes. it may get built I do not know this is in the negotiating stage, but the design is 90% finished.  I find that trying to go into old patents may lead you up the wrong path I like to do it my way, think for my self and I can think outside of the box.
I do look at information that is relevent, and do take interest in what is said, such as tom breaden. I think thats right.
 so in a word no.
 I did speak to John Christie from Lutec today , to find out why his process is not doing so well, I also looked into the way that he was operating his project.
 for 100watts input you would get 440watts out put.   his system is a DC motor driven rotor, with a perment mag rotor, the pulsed out put is from induced pulses into a iron cored pole pieces, laminated I would say, this output is rectified,  normal stuff after that just into a battery pack from there you drive your load throug an invertor.
well I hope that has helped you.
aussepom


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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2010, 20:14:59 pm »
I hope you have great success with this design and project.

Looking forward to following the excitement.

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2010, 10:44:38 am »
 Hi there

      the machine shop looked at the design today, there will be no pro do the job, now for those out there think on this    if all the magnetic fields with in the motor were in a vacumm what diference would it make??   will it improve the magnetic fielf or not?   
this some thoughts because of the design
the next stage will be some testing.
some of this I will be able to hare, it seems that if the tests are ok  then the 'client'' will go ahead with the very large investment.
Some of my fiding I will be able to share.
aussepom



















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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2010, 10:50:52 am »
The magnetic permeability of air is only 1.00000037 the magnetic permeability of the vacuum. not really a difference, vacuum is not worth the effort. Unless you want to minimize the friction of your rotating parts if there are any.

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2010, 15:16:08 pm »
Hi there

               the rotating parts and the magnet and coils due to the design is a closed compatment i was discussing today on putting in vetilation into the enclosed area, the rotating parts are al in there and so is the magnetic fields   that was the reason for the enquiry,
 it would be easy to pull a vac in there.
aussepom

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2010, 19:26:17 pm »
If you have a magnetic field moving across a gap, you know the magnetic field falls off at radius^2, so usually these gaps are 0.005"

If there is heat involved, you will want cooling... think of an alternator, has a tight gap, and cooling fan, but, if you have a strong vacuum, then you have a perfect insulator because heat will not travel through a vacuum, so if it's hot on the outside you can cool it from the outside but if it is getting hot on the inside and it is surrounded by a vacuum then it will not be able to cool, unless you have internal cooling of course... and if you are dealing with high temperatures then you have to think about the maximum temperatures the magnets can withstand before they loose their magnetic properties

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2010, 00:36:51 am »
hi there

               thanks guys for the feed back on that, I may then for a start put in ventilation, if there is no other advantage.
 
         on with the testing.
     aussepom

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2010, 13:23:00 pm »
Hi there
                    air gap well I think it is all how strong you magnetic field is, 5thou is not practical unless you have top bearings, and the unit well machined.

          I also think that it is the way that you design the unit. most motors and alternators have a bigger air gap than that, 2 to 3mm or around 3/16ths.
 
           If you take the axial flux approach, and also use the Tom Breadens thinking of  repelling magnetism.   

The Bedini ten pole energizer, if any of you can get some information it would be helpful to our group.
Such as the out put AC before it is rectified, the rectified DC and its voltage and current.
Why, well he shows a big set of batteries, they look like 19 plater’s, if he can supply a big enough charge to a 24 or 48v system, you may be able to use it for alternative power.

I can not find any out put stuff, he mentioned 1800amp hour batteries, I would say that was the total of the battery bank.
So they could supply 100amps for 18 hours, but at what voltage. Was the battery bank 12 24  48 ? or 2x6V 900 A/H
With out this information you could not spend $US5,000.

My system should be a lot better, thing of using both ends of the magnets.
If you do get a big enough supply, think about  using this system on your house.
I hope the attach comes out may have to save it as a pic.
 
Here is the caption to go with it
The Bedini Energizer could be your alternative power supply, or your own
What is required is a new switch board, (take it to another home) remove all the house circuit from the bottom of the fuses or breakers connect then to the new board. Have a legal power outlet fitted alongside your old switch board, this is used to trickle  or charge the battery bank. The battery bank now supplies your power via a DC to AC inverter to your new switch board.
The is know as a no break system, and a more complicated version is used by many large information companies that use big computer systems.   So do the same, if you have a big enough alternative power supply.

aussepom