Author Topic: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse  (Read 10236 times)

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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2009, 20:25:29 pm »
incoming signal (49a xxx 49n) is electrically linked with Water-Gap Capacitor (Cp)
Damn, missed this one, 49 is from pulser

it is to prevent coil ringing, why does this setup prevent coil ringing?
why would you want to prevent coil ringing?

is 49 when on/high at the same level as groundstate (level of cutoff,  Q )? that would make sense.

gr8 work btw

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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2009, 20:41:29 pm »
question to all.. you know when your in a auditorium and the speaker gets on the mic.. you start hearing a echo which keeps mulipying in intensity? until it is a a constant screech that can only be stopped  by turning down mic sensitivity or the volume of the speaker..  you should be able to do that with the alternator right? since its main driving force for frequency isnt by current but by rotational speed of the poles.



outlawstc
this the compounding effect, right?

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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2009, 22:16:13 pm »
i think the positive stainless choke during pulse 49a xxx 49n feeds electrons onto positive side of magnetic induction of the primary.. resulting in electron flow back threw primary winding causing primary emf generation during both pulse on and off time... . it just seem like it would work... like the positive side of the capacitor is electrically linked to the primary's positive and the negative exciter is electrically linked in the middle of secondary.. by a center tap being in the center of secondary with diode placed where positive energy can flow into the secondary and send electrons on 180in and 180 out.. .. it would also give logical explanation what on fig 10-1 it  labels the core as secondary and positive as primary...  seems like it might be on the right path.. but still confusing as hell lol..  i think when stan speaks of resonance it may not be resonance of the power sources out but because a alternators frequency changes with rpms.. for instance 5000 rpm is 500 hertz so we could pulse it with 0-20khz and gate that but the output soucre frequency will not remaln constant. nor will its amplitude??? its main goal is to create as pure of a high potential engery source as possible.. reducing its snap back action from phase shift.

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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2009, 23:02:17 pm »
The Hall effect comes about due to the nature of the current in a conductor. Current consists of the movement of many small charge carriers, typically electrons, holes, or both. Moving charges experience a force, called the Lorentz Force, when a magnetic field is present that is not parallel to their motion.[2] When such a magnetic field is absent, the charges follow an approximately straight, 'line of sight' path. However, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, their path is curved so that moving charges accumulate on one face of the material. This leaves equal and opposite charges exposed on the other face, where there is a scarcity of mobile charges. The result is an asymmetric distribution of charge density across the Hall element that is perpendicular to both the 'line of sight' path and the applied magnetic field. The separation of charge establishes an electric field that opposes the migration of further charge, so a steady electrical potential builds up for as long as the charge is flowing.

Ferrite toroid Hall effect current transducer
Hall sensors can detect stray magnetic fields easily, including that of Earth, so they work well as electronic compasses: but this also means that such stray fields can hinder accurate measurements of small magnetic fields. To solve this problem, Hall sensors are often integrated with magnetic shielding of some kind. For example, a Hall sensor integrated into a ferrite ring (as shown) can reduce stray fields by a factor of 100 or better. This configuration also provides an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and drift effects of over 20 times that of a 'bare' Hall device. The range of a given feedthrough sensor may be extended upward and downward by appropriate wiring. To extend the range to lower currents, multiple turns of the current-carrying wire may be made through the opening. To extend the range to higher currents, a current divider may be used. The divider splits the current across two wires of differing widths and the thinner wire, carrying a smaller proportion of the total current, passes through the sensor.

The principle of increasing the number of 'turns' a conductor takes around the ferrite core is well understood, each turn having the effect of 'amplifying' the current under measurement. Often these additional turns are carried out by a staple on the PCB.

Analog multiplication

The output is proportional to both the applied magnetic field and the applied sensor voltage. If the magnetic field is applied by a solenoid, the sensor output is proportional to product of the current through the solenoid and the sensor voltage. As most applications requiring computation are now performed by small (even tiny) digital computers, the remaining useful application is in power sensing, which combines current sensing with voltage sensing in a single Hall effect device.

references----http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall_effect#Quantum_Hall_effect


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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2009, 23:14:08 pm »
The Hall effect comes about due to the nature of the current in a conductor. Current consists of the movement of many small charge carriers, typically electrons, holes, or both. Moving charges experience a force, called the Lorentz Force, when a magnetic field is present that is not parallel to their motion.[2] When such a magnetic field is absent, the charges follow an approximately straight, 'line of sight' path. However, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, their path is curved so that moving charges accumulate on one face of the material. This leaves equal and opposite charges exposed on the other face, where there is a scarcity of mobile charges. The result is an asymmetric distribution of charge density across the Hall element that is perpendicular to both the 'line of sight' path and the applied magnetic field. The separation of charge establishes an electric field that opposes the migration of further charge, so a steady electrical potential builds up for as long as the charge is flowing.

Ferrite toroid Hall effect current transducer
Hall sensors can detect stray magnetic fields easily, including that of Earth, so they work well as electronic compasses: but this also means that such stray fields can hinder accurate measurements of small magnetic fields. To solve this problem, Hall sensors are often integrated with magnetic shielding of some kind. For example, a Hall sensor integrated into a ferrite ring (as shown) can reduce stray fields by a factor of 100 or better. This configuration also provides an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and drift effects of over 20 times that of a 'bare' Hall device. The range of a given feedthrough sensor may be extended upward and downward by appropriate wiring. To extend the range to lower currents, multiple turns of the current-carrying wire may be made through the opening. To extend the range to higher currents, a current divider may be used. The divider splits the current across two wires of differing widths and the thinner wire, carrying a smaller proportion of the total current, passes through the sensor.

The principle of increasing the number of 'turns' a conductor takes around the ferrite core is well understood, each turn having the effect of 'amplifying' the current under measurement. Often these additional turns are carried out by a staple on the PCB.

Analog multiplication

The output is proportional to both the applied magnetic field and the applied sensor voltage. If the magnetic field is applied by a solenoid, the sensor output is proportional to product of the current through the solenoid and the sensor voltage. As most applications requiring computation are now performed by small (even tiny) digital computers, the remaining useful application is in power sensing, which combines current sensing with voltage sensing in a single Hall effect device.

references----http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall_effect#Quantum_Hall_effect


outlaw

very interresting .

Is this how they created the transistor ?

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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2009, 00:24:56 am »
this is a excel spreadsheet..  that calculates hydrogen required with input variables. like cc's of motor and rpms.. i dont know if its accurate with default ratios.. maybe hydro can tell us what they should be?

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Re: alternator vic voltage burst sync pulse
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2009, 03:20:22 am »
outlawstc

Pretty cool vid

Spike ;D