Author Topic: PLL resonant locking  (Read 4504 times)

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Re: PLL resonant locking
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2009, 19:52:35 pm »
Its nice to see the circuit actually works . I wonder how good it would work with an all-in-1 VIC .

We are really getting deep into Meyers now , everything has been revealed , this shit is biblical .

And this guy is just a dream come true , thx alot for this thread , will learn alot from this thread .
« Last Edit: February 19, 2009, 20:14:19 pm by Dankie »

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Re: PLL resonant locking
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2009, 20:47:21 pm »
Take a look at our other topic

http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,344.0.html

I have there a schematic with the TL 594 and also one with the 556
Both with gatings.

br
Steve

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Re: PLL resonant locking
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2009, 19:03:43 pm »
from that site
Quote
Note: I just saw something strange.  I noticed that after I turned the power off, the test cell had some voltage still on it.  I thought the scope was just decalibrated, but on GND it was at center.  Flipped back to DC, it was still showing 1.75 volts DC offset, same as in the picture above (the line at center of the waveform).  Huh?  I disconnected one of the cell wires, and the voltage is still there.  As much as I can figure, the cell is pulling some DC from the scope, and when it gets to the forward bias of the blocking diode, it stops.  So I short the cell, and it bounces back to about 0.6 volts.  I turned the circuit on, and voltage rose slowly to around 1.8 volts DC offset.  I turned the power off again, and it stays around 1.7V.  It looks like it’s sinking, very very slowly.  It’s a little weird.  It’s actually acting like… a capacitor?  Naw, that couldn’t happen.  Okay, I disconnected the scope, shorted the cell, reconnected the scope (0 volts), and then unshorted the cell.  The voltage started rising.  It’s acting like a capacitor and charging from the oscilloscope probe leakage.  Very cool, that’s a nice clue.  If I’m right.  It’s been a long day, I might be hallucinating.
Reminds me of bedini's negative energy effect on a battery as shown in EFTV 7