Author Topic: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See  (Read 31464 times)

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2008, 05:20:26 am »
Ok Hydrocars I understand now.

Not producing hydrogen, but exploding the water like a cap discharge system.

It's like those videos on youtube of people spraying water on the spark plug, but instead of the plug you use the WFC tubes!

GREAT IDEA>

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2008, 05:35:33 am »
Ok Hydrocars I understand now.

Not producing hydrogen, but exploding the water like a cap discharge system.

It's like those videos on youtube of people spraying water on the spark plug, but instead of the plug you use the WFC tubes!

GREAT IDEA>

Please don't overlook how the wfc can be inserted into this circuit, it is an LC resonate circuit.

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2008, 07:31:18 am »
what i see wrong with kevins setup is, He isn't using resistive wire, but a resistor instead "That will not work well" it can do much much better with resistor wire! He doesn't know what he's missing.

The tube cells must be in parallel, the ac capacitors are in series, they should be in parallel.


he states:
"With that said I have paralled and seriesed 4 microwave capacitors, threw in my 3.3mh inductor, coupled in the water fuel cell (using distilled water ONLY), and placed a 2.7 Kilo Ohm resistor (5 watt) on the neutral between the inductor and alternator. The most important thing is the 5 WATT resistor, if I use more than 5 watts in the LRC circuit then the resistor will blow. A WATT is Voltage X Amperage, for example 10 volts at .5 amps is 5 WATTS, so is 5 volts at 1 amp is 5 WATTS, so is 1 volt at 5 amps is 5 WATTS...and so on."

-i'm not quite sure how he has them parallel and series at the time......

edit- i understnad now he is doing 2 birds with one stone......taking care of the series resistance after the bifilar inductor and the parallel resistance to the wfc.....and apparently it works.

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #27 on: October 13, 2008, 10:05:49 am »
Hi all,

Here my 2 euro cents.

When you are going to test with these autoignition coils, be aware that we might need to place a resistor in serie with the wfc-cap.
We get a RLC circuit.
If you have a tubecell with some tubes in it, you have a resistance mostly less then 1 ohm.
If you blow the emf/bemf from the coil into that, it will do that in a very short time periode.
That periode  might be too small.
If you want to release the power of the coil a little bit slower, you can add a resistor in serie with the cap.

br
steve

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2008, 11:39:26 am »
The LC circuit works Perfectly well, I think there's no need to add a resister to it. Perhaps a tuning coil would be better, that could make better since?

If the Capacitor is in series., When the points Fly open Back EMF HV would rather be absoarbed by the Capacitor than jump across the points at around 300 volts, "Burning them." Maybe those are 120 volt caps? and he has 2 of them in series to make an 240 volt cap? I'm not sure what he's done but everytime i put 2 ac caps in series HV would jump, defeating the whole entire purpose of the cap. The purpose is to catch the emf into amps and return it, see oscillation, then a oscillating discharge on to and along with the secondary, which he has no secondary because he is only catching the emf.

Please be aware of the working of the system, how the coil holds a series capacitor discharge that the condenser usually absoarbs, resonates and releases across the plug, all due to the way its wrapped. Also notice that the coil wired this way restricts amps due to how the magnetic field is built up.

I shouldn't have to point this out, this is easy to understand if you can just look at it and see how it works. An our or 2 of just researching "How it works," a good tutorial on the internet and you could master this quickly.

you have 2 coils, points, condenser and battery. Not much to this circuit. It already works the way it is, a perfect example circuit. This is by far the biggest LC resonate circuit i have ever seen in my life and yet its not given the proper credit.

yikes, i'm going to try an build my new coil.

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2008, 12:19:35 pm »
This is an ok page to read a little on  http://www.kronjaeger.com/hv/hv/src/ign/index.html

Ignition coils are usually operated on a DC supply, and just like flyback transformers they need a driver circuit. The simplest circuit is shown above. With the switch closed, an increasing DC current flows through the primary, producing a magnetic field inside the iron core, in which energy is stored. The final current is limited by the internal resistance of the coil, usually a few Ohms. When the switch opens, the current is interrupted and the magnetic field collapses, releasing the stored energy in the form of a large voltage pulse (a few hundred volts across the primary winding). This voltage pulse is multiplied the turns ratio, resulting in a peak voltage of around 30kV. The cap across the switch limits the ultimate peak voltage (see also the chapter on flyback transformers) by slowing down the collapse of the magnetic field, turning the singular transient into a damped high frequency oscillation. Without this measure, an arc would form in the switch after opening, possibly damaging the switch and slowing down the collapse even more, resulting in a much reduces output voltage. The additional resistor prevents welding of the switch contacts when it is closed again and the cap discharges through it.

The mechanical switch can of course be substituted by an electronic one, e.g. a transistor )bipolar, MOSFET, IGBT), which must however be able to withstand high voltages as well as high currents. Additional protection circuitry (varistor/VDR/MOV) is highly recommended. The circuits shown below use SCRs, which are well suited for high current switches.






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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2008, 13:05:35 pm »
Here are some videos i made.

Here is the number of wrapps in the order in which they was removed.

33
40
42
44
47
48

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Re: Stanley Meyers Resonate Circuit A Must See
« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2008, 13:41:14 pm »
A little proof