Author Topic: Plate sizes?  (Read 4517 times)

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CaptainAwesome

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Plate sizes?
« on: May 20, 2008, 21:02:57 pm »
Hello people!

I'm getting closer to buying some SS and having it cut. This is the design for the plates I thought of:



Fig1: Each plate will have 5 holes drilled in it for screwing them together, and one additional hole (upper left corner) for connecting positive or negative plates to eachother.

Fig2: I see now there's a hole missing on the lower plate but just imagine it is there :) Fig2 just illustrates how the holes would be drilled and that the cut is with an angle.

Fig3: Isn't that some sweet 3D in Paint, huh? This is an attempt to show how the exact same cut in every plate could produce easy-to-work-with variations. Orange might be negative, green positive and blue neutral, then this figure would show a -nn+nn-nn+nn- configuration.


The question is, how large or small should plates for "normal" electrolysis be? I'm thinking of going for very little spacing between them and about 3x3 decimeter plate size and to work with ~13-14 volts and ~13 amps. Could/Should I use larger plates? or smaller?

I would also appreciate some feedback on if you see something that is flawed in this design, if you can think of an improvement or anything you can think of really.

Voltar X

  • Guest
Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2008, 21:32:56 pm »
Hello Captain Awesome: I have been working on a plate system also. My plates are 1/16 of an inch spacing, 316L, and identical in size. No diagonal cuts. I had a machinist cut grooves into plastic side plates using a CNC. You're trying to force the current through the plates and not over, under or around them. By using diagonals, voltage will find the easiest path. I use one negative/one positive plate with all neutrals in between. In this configuration, my voltage has increased and amperage has gone down. This is nothing new..check out Bob Boyce's design. He's the man.  I wouldn't recommend drilling any holes in the plates. Hope this helps.

CaptainAwesome

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Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2008, 21:55:53 pm »
Hello Captain Awesome: I have been working on a plate system also. My plates are 1/16 of an inch spacing, 316L, and identical in size. No diagonal cuts. I had a machinist cut grooves into plastic side plates using a CNC. You're trying to force the current through the plates and not over, under or around them. By using diagonals, voltage will find the easiest path. I use one negative/one positive plate with all neutrals in between. In this configuration, my voltage has increased and amperage has gone down. This is nothing new..check out Bob Boyce's design. He's the man.  I wouldn't recommend drilling any holes in the plates. Hope this helps.

I see, the diagonal plates might not be such a good idea after all. Do you think it would still be as bad if I used diagonals but connected them on opposite sides of the cell rather then on the same side?

I want to to able to try out different combinations of +, - and n so I'll have to find some nice way to be able to do that.

In my first cell (about on minute into
, stuff before that is just for fun) i have +-+-+- ... but the small spacing forced me to saw pieces off so the connecting cables wouldn't touch other plates then they were meant to.

About the holes though, what's the problems with holes in the plates? And thanks for great feedback, I'll look at Bob's stuff for some more inspiration. I don't really have access to a workshop nor do I have nice tools so when I pay someone to do it I have to get it right from the start ^^

Voltar X

  • Guest
Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2008, 20:21:16 pm »
C. Awesome: I personally would try all configurations of plates and pos./neg. positioning that you can think of. I have found that what you're trying to do, is limit the path of the voltage...that is, force it to go through the plates instead of around them. If you put holes in the plates, voltage will take the path of least resistance. When I started using plates, I used the H. Depot stainless plates. I tried every configuration that I could think of. I ended up putting 2 plastic bolts through 13 plates with one single nylon washer (on each bolt) as spacers for the plates. I then connected a positive terminal on one end of the stack and a negative terminal on the other end of the stack. I used a variac to control wall outlet voltage and used a bridge rectifier to convert the a.c. voltage to d.c.  My production was outstanding and the more plates I added, the lower the amps went and the higher the voltage went. With this setup, I was running 2 amps @ 79 volts d.c. with no electrolyte..(that's 158 watts)   Tap water only. I did not do gas measurements but I can tell you that it produced alot. I have watched every video and read everything I could on the subject and found that alot of guys are using 12 volts D.C. (from a battery) using electrolyte and running @ 30 amps. That's equal to 360 watts. The only way to learn how to do this is to try all of this stuff yourself. Best wishes in your experimentation. Voltar

jbhuffinstuff

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Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2008, 21:59:08 pm »
captian awesome is your cell going to be a swimmer  or sealed with gaskets

CaptainAwesome

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Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2008, 00:16:26 am »
captian awesome is your cell going to be a swimmer  or sealed with gaskets

I'm guessing a swimmer is when the whole cell is under water? :)

In that case, yes, I think so :) I found an electric water pump that I'm thinking of using for A. pumping water into the bottom of the cell and sucking it out almost at the top to help the bubbles come off the plates as fast a possible and B. to get that water into some sort of cooling system.

It's just that thus far, I'm having trouble finding a company that will sell me 316L plates cut to my specification. When I find someone who will, I'll figure out what kind of box to put them in.

I liked the idea in that Bob Boyce pdf, with the acrylic "holders". I'd much rather do that than drilling.

jbhuffinstuff

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Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2008, 01:42:34 am »
a swimmer wouldnt get any holes drilled thru the plates normally  sealed  plate cells get  a hole drill thru the plate and then you would pump thru that   if you going to build from scratch check out browngas cell it is very nice set up and has the output to match  i think his u toob is h2inice it is also on this site under the rumors of over unity out of cell thread

Z

  • Guest
Re: Plate sizes?
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2008, 09:11:49 am »
Have you guys tried anything with different metal thickness?  Is there a metal thickness that works well or a size to avoid? I want to try experimenting with different size cuts, but was hoping someone knew what kind thickness of metal to use.

Thanks.