Author Topic: Stanley Meyer EPG Theory and EZEPG build tip  (Read 38 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 612
Stanley Meyer EPG Theory and EZEPG build tip
« on: October 13, 2018, 00:06:48 am »
Stanley Meyer EPG and thoughts on the EZEPG build

While designing a larger 6 tier system, the need for a method of winding pick-up coils around the spiraled tiers
(which have three winds became apparent.

I didn't want to buy or make a toroidal winder so:
 
\One method is to cut the spiraled tier in to 3 rings all with slightly different diameters.  The pick up coils will have a
  The length is slighter longer than three times thediameter of the pipe. This rounded slot is shaped so that it slides over three
 pieces of pipe laid side by side 000

The concept is to keep the pickup coil windings as close as possible to the turns of the spiraled  tier to minimize distance
from the magnetic slurry or gas being circulated in the spiraled tiers so a thin yet sturdy tube for winding the coils is preferable

Construction Short-cut

 In this method, the wound  pickup coils are slipped over the largest ring similar to putting beads on a necklace thread, 
The next smaller ring or spiral tube segment is "threaded" through the opening in the solenoid spools.  Then the smallest split
 ringlet is "threaded" through the remaining space of the slot in the pickup coils.  You then have all the pickup coils in a
 circular pattern with 3 parts of the spiral (with a cut through each of the turns of the spiral)     Next use a slip connectors to join
 the 3 section of pipe into a spiral form again.

You now have a spiral with the pickup coils all the way around.
No need for a toroid winder!!

(You can make the ringlets from the cut spiral about 6 inches longer to that the  pickup coil "beads" can be pushed
 out of the way for brazing,  the pick up coils that will be pushed back adjacent to the connector can have a slight recess
made on the end of two pickup coils to accommodate the greater diameter of the connector.)

Traditional builds are either made by laborious hand winding or the construction or use of a toroidal winder

IN THIS CASE WE ARE MAKING THE COILS FIRST AND THEN BUILDING( THE SPIRAL THROUGH IT
WHICH NEGATES THE PROBLEM OF THE 3 AXIS SEWING MOTION USED IN TOROID COIL MACHINES  !!]
( the  sliding of the three parts of the spiral is similar to putting three strands of  carpet thread though the beads of a necklace
or like sewing a button with more than one pass thru the holes in a button)

Also I might add that the inner tubing of the spiral does not have to be  metal, consider using a flexible tubing  PEX(r) ?
and forget about soldering and brazing !!   for the slurry type devices  It may be possible to use a single uncut spiral of
copper tube and slide one all of the coils  (Think about how one puts house keys on a spiraled key ring)  more difficult to
slide the pickup coils on the third pass through.....

Here is the concept of what Stan was doing with the 6 tier system 

He was trying to have a maximum number of flux lines cutby the mag-gas or slurry in a compact size.
Stan realized that by having multiple channels in the spiral ( in his build about 3),he didn't have to make as
many pick up coils. Also the design of  stacking  the spiral coils vertically, he increased the effective length
to over 90 feet of hollow tube surrounded by pickup coils  and could make a powerful device the size of 30
gallon trash can or compact water heater!!


When a magnetic gas or slurry is pumped though such an array at high speed  about 50ips for single phase to 90 ips
 for three phase only a very small magnetic moment is needed to create a tremendous numbers of flux  lines cut  per
 second in the pickup coils.


When building a hexagon frame for Multi-Tier 6  (Build 4) it was realized that all this threading through and bending of tube
was unnecessary.  It is the number of flux lines cut per second. that generates the power After all,  in the existing pictures
of the six tier mag gas system there are clearly vertical drain and feed lines.  Therefore every linear inch of the tubing does[rings one to
not need to be surrounded by pickup coils which brings one to the concept of

The octagon series of EPGs[/b] 

 So why not make a generally circular design like an octagon using of the shelf 135 degree angle fittings??

If one wants to sr\per size it and just use standard 10 ft lengths of copper tube, make 3 octagons 10 feet on a side and
  then connected in an large flat  8 sided "  circle spiral"  which is 240 feet of tubing or about three times the reported\
 length and power of Stan's 6 tier system. Also standard pickup coils can easily slipped over the tubes before  soldering
 the 135 degree joints

I'm attaching a picture to give you an idea of the size possible without doing ANY CUTTING OF 10 FOOT LENGTHS
of course one can make smaller 8 sided spirals the size of a stop sign or even smaller diameter tomake the units
more suitable for house electricalgeneration for a/c or heating or for installation in the boot of an electric car

The second photo is of the new octagon series of EPGs which a more realistic size
construction time as about 10 minutes for the first tier of  "octagon spirals"

It's very easy to slide prewound coils over. the tube since they are straight

Solder joints after putting the coils around the tubes!

The third image shows how an octagon spiral would look like  the white tubes are for illustration only symbolizing
pick up coils which can be much bigger and slipped over 3 tubes at a time 000

  tip don't cut all the tubes at once   After your first  that's how you can make  roundish octagon structures with easy
slip  on pickup coils mound coils, then solder joints  Each octagon loop requires a slightly larger length for the
side to account for the 135 degree connector. For each loop its about 1/2 inch but make your own adjustments
as you go.

Winding coils on the octagon series EPG


Here's a method for the quick winding of coils for polygon type EPGs.  After you have cut the copper channels and fitted
them together without soldering, disassemble the octagon into its eight sides.  Each side will consist of three channels with slightly
different lengths.  Tape or use  stainless hose clamps to bind the three pipes together in as side by side in a flat configuration
such as this  OOO\ Slide a section of all thread through the center pipe and  thread washers and nuts on each end to make  a
pipe spindle that can be placed in a little jig you make for your variable speed drill   or lathe.  then use insulating tape and varnish
to bind the tubes together.  Then slide and spacer wafers from plastic to form bobbins on the pipe assembly. Then use the
drill to turn the three pipe spindle as the wire is being fed. Try to keep the number of turns of wire approximately the
same for each coil. Depending upon the design voltage or amperage desired, one can tap or place the coils in a series
or parallel by using terminal block on each side of the polygon EPG.

TIP  don't WIND THE COILS TOO CLOSE TO THE END OF THE PIPES BECWUSE THERE NEEDS TO BE
 A

 LITTLE ADUSTMENT TO ALLOW FOR THE PROPPER FITTING OF THE 135 DEGRESS CONNECTORS
BASICALLY THE PIPES ARE SLIGHTLY SPLAYED AT THE END
« Last Edit: Today at 15:11:13 by jim miller »