Author Topic: Heat transfer  (Read 2472 times)

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Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2018, 20:06:10 pm »
If you interact light with electricity, you have to deal with parameters.  If the electricity you're using doesn't mutually affect light, you don't have the right kind of electricity. The voltage may be way too low.  Or it might need a poly-phasic characteristic.  (Two signals at 120 degrees gives the sine wave 1.73 of its normal height, which equates to a sharp rise time - but not as good as a compound click.)  Also, where the interaction occurs is another factor.  The electrical signal must get there at the same time as the photon.  So the electrical speed might need to be adjustable.  Minto non-resonance transmits trans luminaly, until 80 to 100 kHz, then quickly drops off, substantially slower.  (Even like molasses, at a high enough frequency.)

From another perspective, even normal electricity can go a specified distance, then curve.  If the completed semi circle would have a resonant length (e.g.: one half wavelength) the curve would throw off an energy beam at some point, and this might interact with light.  Atleast with a longitudinal electrical vibration.

A gradient of these curves should be able to really pump some thermal electrons.

And there's always the option to use rf em as the photon, with the longitudinal force being analogous to the pressure wave given off by a Van deGraaff each time it sparks.  Or maybe just curve the pressure wave at some distance.  Out there in the atmosphere.

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Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2018, 18:31:57 pm »
Two closely spaced spinning discs also work as a charge pump.  The centrifuge force produces a pressure gradient.  Negative ions fly straight outwards, but positive ions move inwards across the gradient.  Close spacing of the discs might be capillary, and the positive ions exist as a blob slowly rotating in the center.  (What force does that produce?)

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Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2018, 20:27:50 pm »
Perhaps a three-phase electrical generator connected to a Step Down Transformer to complete the circuit the low voltage generation. Suppose a second identical setup connected to the first. Suppose a third identical setup connect it to the second. Suppose the first set up generates electricity enter the last are the last generation to the second are they second generates it into the first however you look at it or one fails the other supplies or the other one fails the other ones Supply Suppose there is a resonance what about high voltage step down 2 household usable voltages closely guarded never talked about grounded Deep by the Earth charged High by the skies.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 21:18:58 pm by Hydrocars »