Author Topic: Heat transfer  (Read 2238 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Hidden

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3106
Heat transfer
« on: December 14, 2017, 11:15:08 am »
Hey i´m doing some research on refrigeration cycle... i found something really interesting

In a refrigerator we have mostly 5 parts

condenser

evaporator

compressor (and vaccum pump)

capilar tube

filter

the most interesting part is the capilar tube

its there to create a pressure drop allowing a controlled flow rate between the high pressure and vacum side.

at the output of the capilar the gas will evaporate creating a cold side, the interesting thing i noticed is that this capilar is also wound over this cold side in many applications with the effect of  `` increasing the efficiency ``

A pressure drop in a capilar tube should not create a temperature change should it? different than a resistor that develops heat when we apply voltage as the current flows.. basically the flow of the gas by it self should not create a  temperature change.. so they take the start of the capilar (heat side) and wind over a cold side tubing with the intention of refrigerating the gas before it travels the capilar tube so it will reach the dead end with a much lower temperature than would be possible..

thats my first impressions of it..

I learned, correct me if im wrong.. but refrigerator can transfer heat easier than a resistor can create the same heat.. this mean it would be possible to extract heat from the ambient and simply concentrate it.. to run a turbine or a piston ...

solar energy could be used probably with a amazing efficiency, since we can use small heat collectors to grab all the power of the sun...

cheers


Online Hidden

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3106
Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2017, 12:24:32 pm »
This principle of feedback is amazing!

Offline Hidden

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 370
  • let the voltage do the work
Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2017, 23:55:03 pm »
The moving gas or fluid has lower pressure, a lower pressure means that there are less atom collisions so there's less heat, it's E=3/2kT for the solid ball theory I did this shit 4 years ago, waste of my time.  It's just heat engines really.

How is it going with these theories guys? My last theory was for a  fusion reactor, maybe you can entertain yourself with it if you want, it was essentially having 2 cancelling  counter rotating magnetic fields in the x,y and z  axis, the  accelerator should have been the size of a room to achieve boron fusion if I remember correctly, never got to anything with it, I wasted 3 months of my life trying to design an electric motor running sim after sim, magnetic fields are nothing as we think they are, things don't work in real life as we think they would. My motor was a coreless induction motor it worked in sims but I don't think I could have built it, the electronics are out of my league.

« Last Edit: December 27, 2017, 00:29:57 am by geon »

Online Hidden

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3106
Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2018, 13:30:57 pm »
I assembled a small refrigeration system and started to learn a lot from it.. basically I found that heat pumps can have a high cop of the difference between evaporated and condensed temperatures is not too big

I found that we could possibly use a turbine to extract the extra power directly... I’m starting to think that the epg of Stan had something to do with this principle. Basically you can concentrate energy from the ambient heat but if. It’s concentrated you can boil water and run a turbine too

Online Hidden

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3106
Free energy from ambient
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2018, 23:16:33 pm »
Guys i would like to share some important findings...

Basically I found that is indeed possible to have a cop greater than 4 with heat pumping systems. With the exceptional side effect of having a cold side capable of being useful for many applications!

Now how can we take this and try to understand this process and apply to another systems to get cop greater than 1

How the freezing cycle works?

It takes a compression for concentrating the heat such as it can be taken or dissipated away allowing the refrigerant gas to later gain heat energy from the ambient again and continue the operation.

Looking at electricity how can we compare that situation? What would be the refrigerant gas? What would be the compression? How will it be dissipated or absorbed from ambient?

Offline Hidden

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 119
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Free energy from ambient
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2018, 00:23:38 am »
Guys i would like to share some important findings...

Basically I found that is indeed possible to have a cop greater than 4 with heat pumping systems. With the exceptional side effect of having a cold side capable of being useful for many applications!

Now how can we take this and try to understand this process and apply to another systems to get cop greater than 1

How the freezing cycle works?

It takes a compression for concentrating the heat such as it can be taken or dissipated away allowing the refrigerant gas to later gain heat energy from the ambient again and continue the operation.

Looking at electricity how can we compare that situation? What would be the refrigerant gas? What would be the compression? How will it be dissipated or absorbed from ambient?
If electricity is the refrigerant it has to be static electricity in the form of free electrons.  The medium to pump them through needs to be a longitudinal field.  This is not the natural medium but it can still conduct transmitted effects such as electrical vibrations.  Properly phased compound vibrations should entrain the static and move it with its inherent potential, regardless of the current.  The electrons could come from the plasma in a spark gap, moving into the longitudinal circuit through a third spark gap electrode.

Online Hidden

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3106
Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2018, 23:22:59 pm »
tHIS VIDEO TALKS ABOUT hydrogen being a superconductor at very high pressure



Online Hidden

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3106
Re: Heat transfer
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2018, 23:31:22 pm »