Author Topic: Spiral Wire Electrodes  (Read 7289 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online Hidden

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 123
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2016, 19:07:24 pm »
I'm also interested in your tube arrangement. ...I have a lot of tubes and would love to learn how to use them.I have one in particular that looks like a switch inside if you don't mind me posting a picture.

I'd love to see your picture!  I'm basically visually oriented, so a picture here and there adds depth to a discussion.


Offline Hidden

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 512
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2016, 19:50:28 pm »
I've wanted to use tubes for a long time and haven't seen anyone else using them.most of the numbers are gone from the tubes I have making it difficult for me to understand how to use them to amplify a waveform but this one looks like a switch and I can't find any literature on it.

Online Hidden

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 123
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2016, 00:25:23 am »
That looks like a vacuum tube with a relay type switch.  It looks like the switch is closed, but you could ring it out to be sure.  Check for continuity with an ohm meter or battery with light bulb.  Next to the right hand arm is something which might be a heater, used to bend that arm away from the other.  Check to see if it's connected to two base pins.  If this is the case, the tube would be an over current safety device.  If not, turn the tube over and post another picture.

Online Hidden

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 123
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2016, 02:15:40 am »
As a control experiment, I made an assembly in which both spirals are the same size, interwound in a parallel configuration, just as shown in the original video.  Most of his video deals with his winding jig, which I didn't need with the smaller size wire.  The only other difference is he has one connected at the bottom, with both of mine connected at the top.  But he's getting the same effect, with tiny bubbles making the water cloudy.  And about the same amount of bubbles.


With mine, either way, I'm getting a strong boiling like effect up to the surface, even raising the water in the middle.  But most of the bubbles reflect back down into the water, rather than breaking the surface.  As a result, very little gas is actually coming through the bubbler.  When the cloudiness reaches its maximum, I still see the boiling from the top.  So the dispersed bubbles aren't inhibiting further gas production.  It's possible the bubbles are recombining into water, at some rate of equilibrium.  There's a mystery here and I intend to get to the bottom of it.

I'm also going to try using the concentric spirals with Meyer type pulses, so I can see if all of his gas is leaving the cell.  I think I'll try generating pulses with a bunch of small neodymium magnets positioned around the edge of a treadmill motor's rim.  I can leave spaces for the break part of the cycles.  And two rows of magnets, one with reverse polarity, will allow for opposing peaks from two pick up coils.  (Magneto coils.)  This motor is rated for 100 VDC, but it still spins at a pretty good clip when connected to my solar panel.  I can give it more juice if I need to.

Online Hidden

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 123
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2016, 22:43:48 pm »
One more experiment was all it took to figure it out.  The tiny bubbles are charged.  As such, they're attracted back into the electrodes, forming a toroidal turbulence going upwards in the center of the cell.  This turbulence causes the appearance of on going gas production, when the bubbles are actually inhibiting that operation.  It looks like the same amount of bubbles are hitting the bottom of the water's surface, on the top, but most of these bubbles are the same ones to begin with.  The solution was easy enough, and will be open sourced in due time.  I don't want someone taking out a patent on this, preventing its widespread use.

Now I can finish my micro torch, then move on to the next phase of the project, which is to properly electrify the flame.  That T spark is very hot, when combined with the regular discharge.  After that, I'll ionize the gas (with a flame), then I'll detonate it, using either my Puff Spark or my Ball Lightning discharge.  Just to see what happens.  The Plasmoid Spark causes a candle flame to explode - something I open sourced several years ago on Bill Beatty's FreeNRG forum.  But I may be able to do better than that.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2016, 23:19:53 pm by tektrical »

Offline Hidden

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 512
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2016, 04:00:08 am »
One more experiment was all it took to figure it out.  The tiny bubbles are charged.  As such, they're attracted back into the electrodes, forming a toroidal turbulence going upwards in the center of the cell.  This turbulence causes the appearance of on going gas production, when the bubbles are actually inhibiting that operation.  It looks like the same amount of bubbles are hitting the bottom of the water's surface, on the top, but most of these bubbles are the same ones to begin with.  The solution was easy enough, and will be open sourced in due time.  I don't want someone taking out a patent on this, preventing its widespread use.

Ive allways wanted to check for dissolved hydrogen from within " The Cloud" of the water.
Ive read its hard for even commercial water ionizers that haven't actually checked the content other than an ORP reading, which is misleading because a high ORP doesn't give a dissolved hydrogen reading.
We can read enough literature on the net to understand at the anode side water becomes lower in pH and of course on the cathode side the water becomes higher in pH.
This tells us at the Anode side we have free hydrogen(H+) ions and on the Cathode side we have hydroxyl (OH-) ions.That part becomes basic knowledge in the world we live in.
Its not so very basic tho as we put our electrodes in some water and notice that familiar murky cloud start to form (or is it ) and wander what is going on.At first sight we want to think ....wow.... look at all that hydrogen.....which in a basic sense would be a correct assessment  but as we study and learn we come to discover its not just hydrogen in that cloud of water sinking to the bottom....its hydroxyl as well :) We learn that the hydrogen and the hydroxyl are actually joining together to form.....water .But why ? Why is the stuff in there im wanting to form a gas for the most part attracted to each other and making the stuff I want to split????why IS GOING ON??? I don't want to make water I want to make gas !!!!!! Lordy Mercy :)
Ok so .....we learn if we separate the lectrodes what happens to that cloud? Does somewhat basic knowledge tell me if the ions are attracted to each other then I guess I need to keep em separated....ok ,so the cloud disappeared but these bubbles seem like they lost some bang and my power supply just cant make enough gas.I want more power AND more gas !!!!
Lets take the separator back out see if the cloud appears again....
S O B that cloud....but wait....yep ,theres that loud pop again...ok but dam....that sure *  me off that Im back to making water again .Why is there so much water making going on.....gotta be a way to keep em from doing that, wait.... did Stan say something about that? Yea, he did..... but wasn't that to do with the combustion process?? I guess, but can I  look at this dam cloud that way....as a combustion process??? Crap what was it that Stan said about that stuff?


I want to keep going with that story but I don't want to waste to much of everybodys time with my ....story :)

It puzzled me for a long time trying to figure out that part and to be honest... I still don't know it all but I love working with it.

Your spiral electrodes are an event in and of its self , with your T diode and ball lightning Im guessing its not that hard to see a charge separation effect taking place and cant wait to see some of that part... its a monster of a challenge to figure things out and with a little help I think and believe this nightmare will soon be basic knowledge in this world we live in as well :)
Keep on Keeping on :)
« Last Edit: October 15, 2016, 04:20:27 am by Burnhydroxy »

Online Hidden

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 123
  • Build it. Power it. Use it.
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2016, 23:49:26 pm »
Ive allways wanted to check for dissolved hydrogen from within " The Cloud" of the water.

Not sure if we're talking about the same "Cloud".  What I'm seeing isn't gasses dissolved in the mass of water.  It's more like colloidal bubbles, each with a shell charge.

Quote
We can read enough literature on the net to understand at the anode side water becomes lower in pH and of course on the cathode side the water becomes higher in pH.
This tells us at the Anode side we have free hydrogen(H+) ions and on the Cathode side we have hydroxyl (OH-) ions.That part becomes basic knowledge in the world we live in.

Somewhere along the line I got the impression that electrolysis produces hydrogen and oxygen.  If everything is in the atomic, rather than molecular, state, there would be twice as much gas coming from the hydrogen producing electrode.  With my spirals, that's the one which is negative.  (The cathode.)  If the output were hydrogen and hydroxyl, the gas volumes would be equal.

Quote
Its not so very basic tho as we put our electrodes in some water and notice that familiar murky cloud start to form (or is it ) and wander what is going on.At first sight we want to think ....wow.... look at all that hydrogen.....which in a basic sense would be a correct assessment  but as we study and learn we come to discover its not just hydrogen in that cloud of water sinking to the bottom....

The cloud of bubbles in my cell doesn't sink to the bottom.  Only to the bottom of the electrodes.  Sometimes not quite that far, as the upwards acceleration at the center pulls the bubbles back in.  And it's more of a rolling circulation, rather than a sinking.  Too bad all of my video cameras have disappeared. 

Quote
We learn that the hydrogen and the hydroxyl are actually joining together to form.....water .But why ? Why is the stuff in there im wanting to form a gas for the most part attracted to each other and making the stuff I want to split????why IS GOING ON??? I don't want to make water I want to make gas !!!!!! Lordy Mercy :)

Me too.  With my first test run, very few bubbles were breaking the surface.  I was getting like one bubble through the bubbler in just under a second.  Now I'm getting a very satisfying steady stream of bubbles.

Quote
Ok so .....we learn if we separate the lectrodes what happens to that cloud? Does somewhat basic knowledge tell me if the ions are attracted to each other then I guess I need to keep em separated....ok ,so the cloud disappeared but these bubbles seem like they lost some bang and my power supply just cant make enough gas.I want more power AND more gas !!!!

I'm not separating the electrodes.  If I did, it wouldn't be the same apparatus.

Quote
Your spiral electrodes are an event in and of its self , with your T diode and ball lightning Im guessing its not that hard to see a charge separation effect taking place and cant wait to see some of that part... its a monster of a challenge to figure things out and with a little help I think and believe this nightmare will soon be basic knowledge in this world we live in as well :)
Keep on Keeping on :)

Thanks for the encouragement.  But I'm not using any exotic effects at this point.  Just straight DC.  The rest of it will be for the fusion configuration Stan was so kind as to illustrate, even if he did leave out a couple of connections.  But I can't issue a strong enough WARNING right here:  if you expect to get fusion, SHIELD yourself!!  It may take a couple of years for neutron damage to start appearing, but the worst is 15 to 20 years down the line.

Offline Hidden

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 512
Re: Spiral Wire Electrodes
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2016, 04:51:23 am »

With mine, either way, I'm getting a strong boiling like effect up to the surface, even raising the water in the middle.  But most of the bubbles reflect back down into the water, rather than breaking the surface.  As a result, very little gas is actually coming through the bubbler.  When the cloudiness reaches its maximum, I still see the boiling from the top.  So the dispersed bubbles aren't inhibiting further gas production.  It's possible the bubbles are recombining into water, at some rate of equilibrium.  There's a mystery here and I intend to get to the bottom of it.

This cloudiness.... what is that and is that the mystery  here or is it the lack of production?