Author Topic: Injector Project  (Read 7741 times)

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2016, 20:51:36 pm »
I put together a four stage voltage multiplier with the cheap caps, fed by the MOT.  This is hooked up to a bank with four strings of four caps.  The caps are holding.  And I also verified that there is a ripple voltage spark from the output of the auxiliary cap at the top, relative to the high potential output electrode.  This spark is swinging around 6.4 kV, plus and minus some or all of the 1600 kV across the top cap.  (These figures are approximate, due to losses in the multiplier.)  And I'm using the bank as the load, between the high point electrode and ground.  It should be obvious that the ripple voltage could power a step up transformer, rather than the current source shown in the patent.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US4789997.pdf

When I have time, I'll test this with my cell which has less than optimal electrode spacing.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2016, 02:02:50 am »
My new gradient plate is super thin, just under a quarter inch.  This allows it to accommodate the shorter spark from a MOT.  It still has the nine layers of aluminum foil, separated by dielectric.  I'm using a mixture of furnace cement and magnesium oxide.  The furnace cement is basically water glass (sodium silicate), which is easy to make, and I got the magnesium oxide by drying out a bottle of Milk of Magnesia.  This last part is to increase the electrical insulation.  And I've found out that iron citrate would also help with the insulation factor.





I've also been working on my capacitor bank.  It now has two one MFD banks in parallel.  This is putting out a reasonably good spark.  I've got two ripple voltage take off caps and both will spark to the multiplier output.  With six caps and two exotic outputs, I'm calling the multiplier part of it a "Gray Network".  My goal is to produce an over/under waveform, with two sine waves, one above the other, with a constant potential difference between them.  Two square wave pulse trains would also work, with each train switching between two values, while maintaining a constant amplitude difference.



I don't really need the capacitor bank while using the Gray Network, although I may need to short the multiplier's output with a resistor.  And I don't think a differential probe will show the waves, due to the lack of changing difference between them.  You'd probably need a spectrum analyzer.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2016, 02:17:52 am by electrotek »

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Ion Sparks - No Mean Free Path
« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2016, 16:29:28 pm »
A moving ion has a mean free path which can be calculated with a formula which considers pressure or density, as well as velocity producing voltage.  This free path is the distance an ion can move before it's likely to hit some other molecule.  If this collision does occur, maximum efficiency lies with the lowest usable voltage.  However, ion sparks don't seem to collide with anything on an extremely short distance.  Instead, they travel along a hair line spark that's thin enough that the ions just wriggle through and past air molecules they encounter.

I've been looking at a regular spark plug and it seems to have a resonant chamber at the end, around the tapering ceramic insulator surrounding the central rod electrode.  With my setup, I can hear a buzzing noise from the spark plug's arc, and there's also some random clicking sounds.  Now and then, one of the clicks will be just right to hit the resonance of the end chamber.  This causes ions to form.  And these ions develop a normal coulomb force which limits the number of ions which can be present in the resonant chamber.  As a result, a certain number of ions immediately shoot out, traveling along a hair line spark.  This ion spark has a different color than a regular electrical spark, and that's what convinces me the spark contains ions.  These ions travel out a good half inch, forming a mesh like pattern in the air.  They're certainly not encountering a mean free path restriction.  AND these sparks are longitudinal - they move straight out for a distance, then stop.  Or then move in a perpendicular direction due to the negative magnetic rotation, when it appears during each of the cycles.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2016, 16:41:24 pm »
very nice findings... what was the voltage potential you were using? are you driving the spark plug with a vic?


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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #28 on: February 14, 2016, 21:08:48 pm »
very nice findings... what was the voltage potential you were using? are you driving the spark plug with a vic?

I'm using my new 7.5 kV NST.  It cost me $142 including shipping.  It's the old copper and steel model, but it does have an annoying electronic GFI circuit built in.  I'm also using a defibrillator diode.  Like the MOT diode, this one is over rated for the voltage.  It's actually good for 30 kV at 10 Amps.  With a fast response.  And I have one other, proprietary component.

The thing I'm thinking about the hair line sparks is that they're not going to produce an ion cascade.  The sparks never get any wider.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #29 on: February 14, 2016, 21:27:34 pm »
Yes maybe spark should be avoided,,, depends on what you are trying to accomplish..

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #30 on: March 08, 2016, 22:55:08 pm »
When an electromagnetic wave travels along a wave guide a distance equal to half of its wave length and then is reflected back into itself, the result is that the electric component of the field cancels out while the magnetic component doubles.  This leaves a magnetic gradient in the wave guide which has the ability to accelerate ions. 

I've noticed that a high speed ion has a trail which is narrower than the size of the ion's glow.  Meyer said in one of his patents that when the ions have been accelerated enough they punch right through the water and the water has very little effect on them.  So there wouldn't be any cascade at the higher velocities.  However, when the ions are just starting to be accelerated, they would seemingly be able to produce some cascade.

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Re: Injector Project
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2016, 14:18:33 pm »
I also seen ion acceleration in my electromagnetic influenced cell, 3 years ago.
It was nice to see, however, the amount of electrical power i pumped into the coils, didnt make me very happy...
But it works....