Author Topic: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell  (Read 17689 times)

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #40 on: May 06, 2008, 14:07:07 pm »
 I tried to go straight into the rotor from the amp but it would not excite. I had to convert it to dc for it to do anything.

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #41 on: May 06, 2008, 15:39:37 pm »
Hi Karebill, we need sine wave signals that are above the 0 volt line (fig B) to do that modulation properly. You can not do that with with a car audio amplifier because signals are always AC coupled to ground (fig A). This would cancel out in the rotor inductance as you already noticed.
This modulation thingy remineds me Andrea Puharich. I beleave Meyer copied a lot of Andrea`s work.

look at the waveforms in here
http://www.rexresearch.com/puharich/1puhar.htm

hmask
« Last Edit: May 06, 2008, 16:44:11 pm by hydrogenmask »

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #42 on: May 07, 2008, 03:41:57 am »
 That is why I used the full wave rectifier after the output of the amp. I hooked the oscope up to it and it puts out a very clean waveform, exactly the frequency that the computer is showing it to be in pure dc.

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #43 on: May 07, 2008, 08:30:25 am »
Try connecting an low voltage isolated dc supply in series with the amp output to obtain waveform as figure B

hmask

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #44 on: May 07, 2008, 15:51:53 pm »
 I dont understand why I need to add a power supply in series with the amps output. When I view the output with a scope it already looks like fig B.

hydro

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #45 on: May 07, 2008, 16:21:46 pm »
what are you trying to do karebill? i have not been following this topic that close.

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #46 on: May 07, 2008, 17:16:30 pm »
If you remove the bridge from the output of the amp, you will see fig A on the oscope.
If you add a let say 5v dc supply in series with the output of the amp, you would see the same sinewave but shifted to the 5v mark. Fig B.

Now if you hook that 'shifted full sinewave' to the rotor, you would be able to observe a smaller sinewave running on a larger carrier sinewave (produced by the alternator.) at the stator when alternator is running.
Ths is very close to some waveforms on Andria`s patent.
Try verieng both carrier wave(alternator) and feed signal frequencies ;)


HM

 
 
« Last Edit: May 07, 2008, 17:20:54 pm by hydrogenmask »

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Re: How to find the efficiency of a fuel cell
« Reply #47 on: May 07, 2008, 21:45:27 pm »
I did some test and I do see that the rectifier does change the wave by reducing the voltage or dB. These pictures are all at 200 Hz. The rectified wave is in the first picture. The second pic is the wave straight from the amp. The third pic is with 4 vdc in series. Why if I add that 4 volts does it carry the whole wave above the 0-volt lie and change it to dc? I will try with the alternator when I get it reassembled. Thanks for the help.