Author Topic: The water capacitor  (Read 1513 times)

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The water capacitor
« on: December 27, 2012, 06:27:50 am »
I started to talk about this in my Steam resonator topic but I felt it deserved its own thread. Our cells have two conductive plates and a dielectric separating them, what could be the problem? Well, water is conductive so Stan addressed this issue with inductors to reduce amp flow. Does this not mean that we will have a voltage drop across the inductor rather than the cell? since we have inductors on either side it is possible to have high voltage across the cell but why would it act like a capacitor? We are not charging it but rather moving a small current through it such as if we placed a resistor between the inductors rather than a cell, because of this, we are not effecting the entire dielectric significantly but rather just the few ions which transfer the electrons. This is a big problem!

I am not posting this because I know it to be fact, This is based on my observations. Any input is welcome and I hope to here how we can fix this issue or my understanding  :) 

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Re: The water capacitor
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2012, 16:11:28 pm »
I believe Stan acknowledged that there would be minimal current leakage however that is not the issue.  I have observed the same as you commented here however I believe you are omitting certain details. Yes the inductors are intended to limit the current.  However the inductors also create a voltage charge while acting as secondaries on the VIC coil.  Current is limited only when the circuit is in resonance.

TS

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Re: The water capacitor
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2012, 18:24:26 pm »
 I do understand that we can produce voltage and restrict amp flow with the Vic.
The voltage I measure across the cell is in reverence to ground. When I try to mearure in reference to the other side of the cell, I get almost nothing. I believe this is because the cell is just acting as a wire. I see almost no voltage drop across it.

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Re: The water capacitor
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2012, 05:55:49 am »
Just saw that I locked this topic, sorry guys, I didn't mean too.

Basically what I'm saying is all my tests so far have shown the water cell as a resister, not a capacitor.

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Re: The water capacitor
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2012, 14:20:21 pm »
Again agreed.  This is also indicated in the patent.  This is why the VIC is used to limit current. To reduce the resistor effect and increase the capacitive effect.

TS