Author Topic: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift  (Read 9836 times)

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2012, 19:16:42 pm »
I just found an interesting parameter... If the system is at resonance it behave as a pure resistor, this mean the source is feeding voltage and current with no lag or lead... so to really *  the current the system must be out of resonance... or the resonance must be elsewhere

If the inductive reactance is big, the resistance is small and the capacitive reactance is also small than, voltage leads the current by say 89°... This mean a frequency higher than resonant frequency for example...

Because the angle ° between current and voltage is = arctan (XL-XC)/R in degrees, If the angle is positive the voltage leads current and if negative the current leads voltage...

At resonance the power factor seen by the source is 1 or close to it...

So if we were to apply energy at this higher frequencies what happens?

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2012, 19:41:59 pm »
I just found an interesting parameter... If the system is at resonance it behave as a pure resistor, this mean the source is feeding voltage and current with no lag or lead... so to really *  the current the system must be out of resonance... or the resonance must be elsewhere

According to Meyer, the resonance is only between the cell and L1.

Next blurb is on another tangent. 

Something occurred to me a little while ago as I watched water drain from a tub.  The water would drain a little, the water level would go down a little and then interestingly the water actually surges back up again momentarily.  Obviously because the pressure in the pipes exceeded the water drain pressure.  But it made me think of a natural system's inclination to self balance.  The same occurs as we try to destabilize the water using voltage.  We need to interrupt the water's inclination to restabilize after applying the voltage pulse to it.  This is either accomplished through the resonant action, OR there needs to be a mechanism in the process to hold it in the destabilized state as we attempt to further destabilize it.

Anyway, just some ponderings I thought to share.

TS

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2012, 20:02:16 pm »
I believe its pretty much like this Ts, when you takes something out of equilibrium this something wants to come back to equilibrium. However when you reach too far from equilibrium, and the thing try to equilibrate itself it just cant because it has more energy than could handle in equilibrium... so it got to become something else.

Think of a piano... If you add 1meter of gravitational potential than let the piano fall in the ground it will get damaged...

If you take this piano 10meter higher than when you let it fall it will get completely destroyed...

When the high voltage pulse frequency is applied to the water the water ions get ionized this mean free electrons and positive ions, If you than make them to combine there inside they will do so with the simplest configuration possible, assuming recombination to water will be only a small portion...because electrons have a ratio of charge to mass much greater than the H+ ions and far much greater than OH+ ions, this mean the speed of the electron in comparison must be several magnitudes greater.... They should want to go to the lower energy state but this is far apart at the other side of the cell than the simplest configuration in terms of molecular scale. Stan stated that its only related to the deflection and movement of electrons... 

The ion and electron feel the same force but as the masses are different if strong enough force is applied the electrons are accelerated much more than the ion... and when they split (ionize) they will go in opposite directions despite the fact they still attract each other.