Author Topic: Maybe using both hho and water......  (Read 6644 times)

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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2011, 06:42:43 am »
I am not saying it can't be done, it may be doing it already for all I know. It's just weird to think of heating water with something that turns into water. The opposite would be akin to, fighting fire with fire...
Hi Bubz, not to be condescending to you as I respect your work that you do here and your opinion on things I find to be well thought out a lot of the time! but fighting fire with fire is a valid tactic, I believe its called over burn, where you force a fire to use all of its fuel up quickly so that it burns out faster.
I understand what you saying though! I don't think its the process of the water reforming of the gas but more the molecular friction that causes the heat which is absorbed by the water :)

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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2011, 15:10:15 pm »
Molecular friction? Please reference an example of water being heated by molecular friction. Heated enough to cause the water to flash to steam...

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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2011, 19:36:33 pm »
Molecular friction?  Microwave. You can "overheat" water in a microwave so it will instantly turn into steam without starting to boil first.

You could increase the power of the engine by injection water mist into the intake air. As CrazyEwok said, it had been done during WW2. Due to the expansion the engine gets some extra torque.

When injection HHO into the combustion engine it can cause backfire because of the hot inside. A way to reduce the heat would be to add some water mist but it will also increase corrosion unless the surface of piston, valves etc. are made out of ceramic. So binding the hydrogen in some kind of fuel would be a good idea since it will eliminate timing problems because of slower combustion and would reduce the heat. But using carbon compound it will lead us to the problems we got today and that fuel would have to be made in advance. Hydrogen alone could be made "on the road". So sticking with the HHO as fuel leaves the problem of water in the engine, increasing corrosion. Someone here in this forum mentioned an additive for the oil to reduce the water.

 

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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2011, 12:08:29 pm »
Hi Guys,
yes please do use 3% powerup NNL690 additive to engine oil, 1%? to power steer and auto fluid and do add .5ml per liter of gasoline for UPPER cylinder lubrication, the key words being, boundary lubrication.

To demonstrate the value of this, obtain some powerup, mix it with oil and see what happens, its much different that observed with untreated oil from my observations, imho, thus boundary lubrication is kept and that is important, look after your investment.





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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2011, 17:28:01 pm »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_injection_%28engines%29

Quote
In internal combustion engines, water injection, also known as anti-detonant injection, is spraying water into the cylinder or incoming fuel-air mixture to cool the combustion chambers of the engine, allowing for greater compression ratios and largely eliminating the problem of engine knocking (detonation). This effectively increases the octane rating of the fuel, meaning that performance gains can be obtained when used in conjunction with a supercharger, turbocharger, altered spark ignition timing, and other modifications. Increasing the octane rating allows for a higher compression ratio which increases the power output and efficiency of the engine. Depending on the engine, improvements in power and fuel efficiency can also be obtained solely by injecting water.[1] Water injection may also be used to reduce NOx or carbon monoxide emissions.

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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2011, 06:45:37 am »
By quoting that bubz are you trying to use it as an arguement for how does it help in this instance? or are you confirming what was being said on how it works?
Pretty much the idea is using the heat produced (however it is produced) to increase the amount of usable pressure from x amount of HHO. Now i am sure Steve will confirm that when he ran is motorcycle on his electrolysis cell the engine still warmed up. Utilizing this heat to convert more power to the engine would mean less fuel (gas production) is required.
Thats the theory from what i understand.


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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2011, 12:30:21 pm »
The fuel savings is not a result of using water, it's the other way around. The water is used to cool the combustion zones instead of liquid gasoline. Liquid gasoline does not burn! I did the quote as to shine a little light on the subject and possibly steer the conversation back to the original question, instead of veering off into molecular friction, microwaves, and what not.

Without water injection or some other means to cool, using gasoline vapors to run a motor/engine will result in overheating. Using HHO, which is in vapor form, does not require cooling. Why?

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Re: Maybe using both hho and water......
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2011, 15:37:55 pm »
My finds with the motorbike engine was that the engine became less warm on HHO then on petrol.
Not sure why.
Maybe the water is cooling it. I did notice some water dripping out my exhaust at the time.
Never seen any petrol coming out..... ;D ;D ;D ;D

Steve