Author Topic: epg  (Read 9869 times)

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Re: epg
« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2012, 01:09:16 am »
the europian patent says the tips of the magnetizable electrode material in the spark gap will be vaporized into particles :)

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  • let the voltage do the work
Re: epg
« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2012, 16:51:20 pm »
yes you all know what that means .. :)

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Re: epg
« Reply #34 on: December 28, 2012, 18:38:26 pm »
Yes, I'm aware of what Stan talks about. I'm most interested in a charged gas rather than a magnetic gas at this point

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Re: epg
« Reply #35 on: December 29, 2012, 06:26:04 am »
Anyone that wants to try to produce a magnetic gas, I wish them the best of luck. What I am most interested in is a negatively charged gas. This is why I have started this topic under my projects rather than the general section.

If we managed to produce a anion gas and alternated it back and forth with electric fields, I believe it would act as ac current and induce a current in the epg coil. After all, electricity is just electrons and their ability to move.

Now for the charged gas. Negative ion generators will not produce a desired effect. We need to provide a source of electrons to add to the gas.   I believe we have a few options for the gas. The gasses with the highest electron affinity would be the most likely candidates because they would be most stable with an extra electron. Any gas in the halogen group would be optimal. Adding a electron to fluorine for example would produce an anion with a neon electron configuration. All though a halogen gas seems logical, hydrogen would be the best candidate in my opinion. Other halogen gasses are dangerous and hard to get. We can make hydrogen at home  :).  Hydrogen its in group one because of its valance electrons but it really should be in group 7 of the representative elements because of its other properties. It has a high electron affinity and electronegativity. With the addition of one electron, it will have a noble gas electron configuration (He). This is why H2 exists in nature.  Since hydrogen has a high electron affinity and because electrons are only in the 1s sub shell, it believe it will form the most stable anion.