Author Topic: epg  (Read 10223 times)

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Re: epg
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2012, 19:17:17 pm »
What I ment was a coil has both a north and a south pole. So why wouldn't the positive ions make contact with the copper tube at the south pole? Do magnetic poles and electric charges not mix in that way? I just need a little help putting my mind at ease haha

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Re: epg
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2012, 03:35:58 am »
A charged particle inside a cylindrical magnetic field wants to go to the center of the cylinder aka solenoid. Thats because is the position of equilibrium. In a toroid they go to the axial center of the field but magnetically anywhere is the center so they stay stop anywhere.

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Re: epg
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2012, 04:47:34 am »
Thanks, I'll take that explanation. My study of stuff like that has a long way to go. I'm starting my formal education of physics next semester. I still have 2 years before I will be done with grad school but after that my plan is to go in your foot steps and study physics. Hopefully I will be half way done by the end of grad school. It seems like the best bath for working on my hobbies.

Anyway, I have my epg set up with an input coil with a core. I don't think that will be good enough but I'll give it a go anyway. My other idea is to charge a hv cap and connect an lead from the positive side of the cap to the copper tube. 

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Re: epg
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2012, 05:07:19 am »
Thanks, I'll take that explanation. My study of stuff like that has a long way to go. I'm starting my formal education of physics next semester. I still have 2 years before I will be done with grad school but after that my plan is to go in your foot steps and study physics. Hopefully I will be half way done by the end of grad school. It seems like the best bath for working on my hobbies.

Anyway, I have my epg set up with an input coil with a core. I don't think that will be good enough but I'll give it a go anyway. My other idea is to charge a hv cap and connect an lead from the positive side of the cap to the copper tube. 

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Re: epg
« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2012, 06:26:53 am »
Did some epg tests today, they were very simple. I pumped Hho and air through a tube filled with magnets and to my surprise I saw a waveform of around 40 mv and a few kz. It seemed really touchy and I would get about 2mv reading from the the pump but maybe Stans first Canadian epg patent has some weight to it. I need to spend a few more hours with it to test but I'm very surprised so far. This was an experiment in expected to fail.

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Re: epg
« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2012, 04:14:41 am »
here is what my setup looks like for testing at the moment.

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Re: epg
« Reply #30 on: December 27, 2012, 06:50:42 am »
In the epg, Stan calls for a magnetic gas. As of now, magnetic gasses don't exist except under extreme conditions. If Stan had created a magnetic gas, I believe he would of had a much more detailed patent about it.

What if we simply created a charged gas rather than a magnetic gas? A negatively charged gas and than we pulse it back and forth in the epg.
It would act as ac moving through a wire and the energy would be transferred to the epg coil.

How do we produce such as gas? I have some ideas

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Re: epg
« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2012, 00:33:53 am »
The generator used for the epg in the epg patent doesnt look like it has water in it..  ill  have to reread it but if it does it looks like a bingo fuel reactor but in my opinion that generator looks like the gas is actually part of the electrodes... like carbon electrodes being turned into a gas themselves or maybe even like steel electrodes being turned into a charged gas.