Author Topic: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action  (Read 6335 times)

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Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« on: March 30, 2011, 06:37:50 am »
This is the video I made of the Stan's "Resonant Scanning Circuit" that I build based on the VIC card. Works really nice.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47n1YfpL4Qc

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2011, 06:48:51 am »
neat stuff rite there  8)

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2011, 00:10:36 am »
thats great man, i'm glad someone has the skills to do this! it be great if you figured out the entire card.
are you planning on releasing the schematics?
anyway your making huge steps forward! keep up the good work

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2011, 04:57:02 am »
Dave,

  I second the motion! Please let us know the details when you get a chance!
Tony, quick question on the resonant scanning circuit from the patent - Q14 and Q15 are not labeled.
Did you use a specific transistor for these, or an IC?
Great work, thanks!

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2011, 09:17:10 am »
Dave,

  I second the motion! Please let us know the details when you get a chance!
Tony, quick question on the resonant scanning circuit from the patent - Q14 and Q15 are not labeled.
Did you use a specific transistor for these, or an IC?
Great work, thanks!

Yes, the IC Stan used was a CD4016BCN

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2011, 21:59:59 pm »
Tony I watched your video on the scaning circuit,and I can tell you that it is not right.Your scope shows the voltage rising and falling,and not the frequency changing.Now I don't know where your taking the measurements from,but if it's right out of the scanning circuit before the primary,it not right.
 
When the scanning circuit is running ,you should see the frequency expand and contract horizontaly and not verticaly.
 
All I see is the voltage rising and falling,and not the frequency.
Don

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2011, 22:51:16 pm »
you should see at the pin 9 of the pll a sine, ramp or exponential wave, of the frequency of the scanning you set, like dynodon said. 
cheers

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Re: Stan's Resonant Scanning Circuit Replication in Action
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2011, 23:54:55 pm »
Tony I watched your video on the scaning circuit,and I can tell you that it is not right.Your scope shows the voltage rising and falling,and not the frequency changing.Now I don't know where your taking the measurements from,but if it's right out of the scanning circuit before the primary,it not right.
 
When the scanning circuit is running ,you should see the frequency expand and contract horizontaly and not verticaly.
 
All I see is the voltage rising and falling,and not the frequency.
Don

yea that scope shot is of the scanning circuit only, which it connects to the VCO of the PLL. The output of the PLL expands and contracts due to the rise and fall of the scanning circuits voltage. All the scanning cir circuit is doing is making the voltage rise and fall and once its connected to the PLL, the PLL will translate the rising and falling of the voltage to a frequency range as set by the POT on the PLL chip. So at the output of the PLL it is expanding and contracting horizontally as the frequency is being changed, so its operating correctly.