Author Topic: tube cell 1.0  (Read 8565 times)

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2011, 02:41:52 am »
 It was similar to an air filter but required a vic to limit leakage current.
It's mentioned in section 3 of the tech brief, there is also a drawing
of it in section 3. I also have a picture somewhere of stan's where he
labeled all of the components including the filter.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2011, 03:40:49 am by HMS-776 »

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2011, 04:31:30 am »
@ hms I will look into that, I've heard of it before but never read about it from stan  I don't understand everything your saying? Is there current/voltage applied to the filter in some way? I bought one them a few months ago but it was just a filter. I personally thought it was just removing impuritys in the water?
if it's differnt from this please let me know!

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2011, 06:17:04 am »
 There is a current limited voltage applied to the filter to remove
contaminates. Removing the contaminates lowers the conductivity
which improves the efficiency a little. Although the vic is designed to
limit leakage current the filter also helps a bit. I think other reasons for
the filter are to prevent the contaminates from getting into the
engine and causing wear and other problems.

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2011, 07:53:16 am »
Ok! So its not an ordanary filter! I will look Into it 

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #20 on: September 10, 2011, 08:13:20 am »

 

 

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2011, 02:45:48 am »
I did some tests a while back with forced water circulation through the water capacitor to see if it would reduce the leakage current.
 
The leakage current was the same with and without the water circulation. Even with a pump that forced a large volume of water through the capacitor.
 
I think Meyer's circulating system reduced leakage current, but only because it pumped the water through an electrostatic filter.



you might be right on that.

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2011, 08:11:10 am »
I think so. I thought the circulation would reduce the leakage current so I performed the test several times. Each time my measurements were the same with and without water circulation.
 
With tap water and 12V applied I had 15mA leakage with and without circulation. Distilled was 5mA leakage with and without circulation.
 
The leakage current will vary with temperature, water type, and applied voltage.

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Re: tube cell 1.0
« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2011, 15:33:48 pm »
That sounds very reasonable that the filter helps restrict current by removing contaminants. 

In my own experement I see a 30% increase in current when the pump is on.

@Hms thanks for the info on the filter!