Author Topic: Herman Anderson  (Read 22439 times)

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2016, 21:00:28 pm »
What makes me think why James and who ever else worked with Hermans original electrodes failed to keep it going,is the thin layer left had worn out and burnt thru...this is how it looked on the inside of one electrode.I tried to draw the jagged edges as it appeared....
I believe the Stanford study is the most important discovery made in the realms of our type of research.I think if we are going to give this an honest go we must perform that expieriment.
My inductor wire wire will be here in the morning and im most excited about that atm.
Herman may have needed the specific 70kV for a specific thickness of the electrode in our little chamber.
I don't have a trifield meter or what ever we will need to measure the milli-Roetgen/hour radiation.....
We know Herman used at least 2 applications of radiation.
We know Herman used "2/ 35kV coils wired in series for 70kV."
We know Herman used series resonance  "it amplify's the current"
We know Herman used a magnetic field.
We know Herman used on demand ozonated water.
We know Herman used KOH with a pH of 12.
We know Herman used a standing pipe to circulate the water.
We know Herman used fog to slow the burn rate.

Have you seen these equations yet?
http://www.accelinstruments.com/Applications/WaveformAmp/Magnetic-Field-Generator.html

lf in addition to a steady magnetic field, varying fields with frequency components in the neighborhood of the Larmor precession frequency are present, the nuclear magnetic moment may be caused to change its orientation by a resonance effect. lf the frequency of an applied oscillating magnetic field, which is oriented at right angles to the direction of the static magnetic field, matches that corresponding to the difference in energy between adjacent orientations according to the rule, Plancks constant times the frequency equals the energy jump, then the transition will occur. lf the match is not close, transitions will be very unlikely.

For example, when a magnetic field of strength 1,826 gauss is applied to a sample of water, the protons which form the hydrogen l nuclei have only two possible orientations with respect to the field. The parallel orientation has the least Steady magnetic field strength Plancks constant For protons this gives 4,250 X magnetic field strength in gauss, or to take the example above 4,250Xl,826=7.76 megacycles per second.At this field strength it takes 5x10(-20) ergs to excite the antiparallel state. Since the magnetic field at each proton is not exactly the same, the resonance will occur in a narrow band of frequencies centered on 7.76 megacycles. The resonance line width, which is the measure of this band width, depends on the inhomogeneities in the applied field, as well as those arising from the internal structure ofthe material.

Except when they are under the influence of a magnetic field the magnetic moments of the protons of hydrogen are in random orientation for before the field is applied, the parallel and antiparallel positions of the nuclei are no different in energy and equally likely to occur. Upon application of the field, the protons snap into line with substantially half parallel and the remainder antiparallel, but this is not a stable condition in the field, because with the field applied, the antiparallel state of the proton has a higher energy, and hence tends to emit this energy difference and drop to the lower parallel state. This tendency is counteracted by thermal motion, which gives rise to field components at the resonant frequency, and hence to transitions up and down between the two states. As a result, an equilibrium is established at any given temperature where there is a slight excess occupation of parallel states compared with antiparallel states. This equilibrium condition is not, however, attained the instant the magnetic field is switched on, but rather'is approached according to a characteristic time known as the thermal relaxation time.
The hydrogen nuclei (protons) in pure water at room temperature have a relatively long relaxation time (about 2 seconds)
The rate at which energy is absorbed from the RF coil depends on the rate at which excited nuclei are deexcited.

 https://www.google.com/patents/US4706030

https://www.google.com/patents/US5461265

An oscillating magnetic field of radio frequency is simultaneously produced.
 If the oscillating magnetic field is tuned to a frequency corresponding to the proton nuclear Larmor precession frequency , radio frequency energy will be absorbed and scattered. As energy is absorbed, the distribution between parallel and antiparallel states is altered.
lf the DC or steady magnetic field is modulated by superimposing upon it a fluctuating magnetic field, the protons of the hydrogen present may be caused to attain the resonant condition periodically.
The intensity of the magnetic resonance effect whether it be observed as nuclear absorption, nuclear dispersion .or nuclear induction, depends on the relaxation time, since the maximum intensity observed is that at which the number of protons being excited by the magnetic oscillations equals the number being deexcited by the relaxation effect.
 
There should be a small phase or amplitude unbalance signal present at resonance. If amplitude unbalance is used, absorption is displayed. If phase unbalance is used, phase-shift or dispersion curve is displayed on the oscilloscope.

with this picture below....you have now seen the inside of Hermans anode.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 14:45:11 pm by KS »

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #33 on: April 11, 2016, 09:08:26 am »
i hate that rickets....

Maybe u can try to get some contact with him too?

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2016, 09:10:02 am »
the inside drawng shows a bad spot or so? What is that?

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2016, 13:51:05 pm »
Maybe these are more clear

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2016, 18:24:40 pm »
Maybe these are more clear

Ahaaaaa  :) ;) ;D
Thanks Kevin......
Its just a bold on top of a hole, welded...

Steve

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #37 on: April 11, 2016, 18:28:15 pm »
What makes me think why James and who ever else worked with Hermans original electrodes failed to keep it going,is the thin layer left had worn out and burnt thru...this is how it looked on the inside of one electrode.I tried to draw the jagged edges as it appeared....
I believe the Stanford study is the most important discovery made in the realms of our type of research.I think if we are going to give this an honest go we must perform that expieriment.
My inductor wire wire will be here in the morning and im most excited about that atm.
Herman may have needed the specific 70kV for a specific thickness of the electrode in our little chamber.
I don't have a trifield meter or what ever we will need to measure the milli-Roetgen/hour radiation.....
We know Herman used at least 2 applications of radiation.
We know Herman used "2/ 35kV coils wired in series for 70kV."
We know Herman used series resonance  "it amplify's the current"
We know Herman used a magnetic field.
We know Herman used on demand ozonated water.
We know Herman used KOH with a pH of 12.
We know Herman used a standing pipe to circulate the water.
We know Herman used fog to slow the burn rate.

Have you seen these equations yet?
http://www.accelinstruments.com/Applications/WaveformAmp/Magnetic-Field-Generator.html

lf in addition to a steady magnetic field, varying fields with frequency components in the neighborhood of the Larmor precession frequency are present, the nuclear magnetic moment may be caused to change its orientation by a resonance effect. lf the frequency of an applied oscillating magnetic field, which is oriented at right angles to the direction of the static magnetic field, matches that corresponding to the difference in energy between adjacent orientations according to the rule, Plancks constant times the frequency equals the energy jump, then the transition will occur. lf the match is not close, transitions will be very unlikely.

For example, when a magnetic field of strength 1,826 gauss is applied to a sample of water, the protons which form the hydrogen l nuclei have only two possible orientations with respect to the field. The parallel orientation has the least Steady magnetic field strength Plancks constant For protons this gives 4,250 X magnetic field strength in gauss, or to take the example above 4,250Xl,826=7.76 megacycles per second.At this field strength it takes 5x10(-20) ergs to excite the antiparallel state. Since the magnetic field at each proton is not exactly the same, the resonance will occur in a narrow band of frequencies centered on 7.76 megacycles. The resonance line width, which is the measure of this band width, depends on the inhomogeneities in the applied field, as well as those arising from the internal structure ofthe material.

Except when they are under the influence of a magnetic field the magnetic moments of the protons of hydrogen are in random orientation for before the field is applied, the parallel and antiparallel positions of the nuclei are no different in energy and equally likely to occur. Upon application of the field, the protons snap into line with substantially half parallel and the remainder antiparallel, but this is not a stable condition in the field, because with the field applied, the antiparallel state of the proton has a higher energy, and hence tends to emit this energy difference and drop to the lower parallel state. This tendency is counteracted by thermal motion, which gives rise to field components at the resonant frequency, and hence to transitions up and down between the two states. As a result, an equilibrium is established at any given temperature where there is a slight excess occupation of parallel states compared with antiparallel states. This equilibrium condition is not, however, attained the instant the magnetic field is switched on, but rather'is approached according to a characteristic time known as the thermal relaxation time.
The hydrogen nuclei (protons) in pure water at room temperature have a relatively long relaxation time (about 2 seconds)
The rate at which energy is absorbed from the RF coil depends on the rate at which excited nuclei are deexcited.

 https://www.google.com/patents/US4706030

https://www.google.com/patents/US5461265

An oscillating magnetic field of radio frequency is simultaneously produced.
 If the oscillating magnetic field is tuned to a frequency corresponding to the proton nuclear Larmor precession frequency , radio frequency energy will be absorbed and scattered. As energy is absorbed, the distribution between parallel and antiparallel states is altered.
lf the DC or steady magnetic field is modulated by superimposing upon it a fluctuating magnetic field, the protons of the hydrogen present may be caused to attain the resonant condition periodically.
The intensity of the magnetic resonance effect whether it be observed as nuclear absorption, nuclear dispersion .or nuclear induction, depends on the relaxation time, since the maximum intensity observed is that at which the number of protons being excited by the magnetic oscillations equals the number being deexcited by the relaxation effect.
 
There should be a small phase or amplitude unbalance signal present at resonance. If amplitude unbalance is used, absorption is displayed. If phase unbalance is used, phase-shift or dispersion curve is displayed on the oscilloscope.

with this picture below....you have now seen the inside of Hermans anode.

That might the reason why it wouldnt work. If it is broken.....
Still, the function of that hole is a mistery. But i am very very glad that you shared that info, Kevin!!!
I really mean it.

cheers!

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #38 on: April 11, 2016, 18:40:48 pm »
ohhhh shit....
Sometimes, i even surprise myself. :P

https://publications.lbl.gov/islandora/object/ir%3A150171/datastream/PDF/view

The hole in the electrode had to do with the neutrons....

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Re: Herman Anderson
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2016, 18:45:15 pm »
and now you ask how the hydrogen ions are getting in that sealed hole...
"Hydrogen ions are small enough to pass through the crystalline steel"
Thats also called embrittlement of metal by hydrogen.

That gives us: hydrogen ions in a hole, with RF plasma beams etc etc, see previous post.

That Anderson was a genius!