Author Topic: Hydroxyl  (Read 7258 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Hydroxyl
« on: April 13, 2010, 08:19:24 am »


More thoughts will follow.

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2010, 20:22:05 pm »
Listen to Stephen's Radio Talk, all 6 hours, meanwhile read this patent and think about how it works, ask yourself the right questions, then play with it in the simulator to see what really does what.

This patent is Stephen's version of a WFC, he describes it in a completely different way and uses a somewhat different method. There is a lot of value in understanding this.

I am now researching into some more clues based on what I just learned, and I'll be doing more simulations. I would have to build a new cell to do any experimentation, but before I can do that I have to check out a few more details and see if it's worth it compared to my other plans.

Offline Hidden

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 457
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2010, 20:29:40 pm »
The only thing i was taking with me about the wfc process from the whole 6 hours was that they calculated a minimum of 13 Volts would be needed to split the water molecule, but 11V was enough for them.
What else important did he say? Most of the time he's telling stories and they discuss stuff not really related to the wfc so i may have overheard stuff.
And the wave-guide stuff obv.

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2010, 20:40:00 pm »
Well the 11/13 volts explains why this system only uses up to 30 volts, mostly less. What can you determine from that about the system?

What are wave guides?

You are right, he only says specifically a few things, but I think the stories are important as well, they set up the background knowledge and mind set for how Stan and Stephen "Think" and why they make the decisions they make.

He also adds details from before 1981 which I think are useful.

What does Stephen say about his own system? What does he say about Stan's?

Offline Hidden

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 457
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2010, 21:24:59 pm »
Well the 11/13 volts explains why this system only uses up to 30 volts, mostly less. What can you determine from that about the system?

What are wave guides?

You are right, he only says specifically a few things, but I think the stories are important as well, they set up the background knowledge and mind set for how Stan and Stephen "Think" and why they make the decisions they make.

He also adds details from before 1981 which I think are useful (assuming it works as claimed).

What does Stephen say about his own system? What does he say about Stan's?
That lower voltage is enough if applied in the right waveform.

Wave-Guide: In electromagnetics and communications engineering, the term waveguide may refer to any linear structure that conveys electromagnetic waves between its endpoints.

He also says that his technology exceeded Stan's by far.

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2010, 21:41:47 pm »
Yea when he said he exceeded Stan's tech, that caught my attention, but he must not be showing that in this patent... he said he started playing around with it and eventually got to the point that he could patent his own system, so this was probably his first worthwhile working system, and he must have advanced it a lot since this, and we don't have those details.

The interesting thing about Stan's Wave-guide's or at least some of them, is that we have the exact measurements. He describes the 4 inch, and the 3 inch cell exactly, plus Dynodons comments.

Stephen's Wave-guides, we don't have the dimensions of, and they do have 3 tubes each. Base on his values resonance is at 468.1 Hz, which you can get out of an alternator depending on your motor and pulleys.

So here is the question, what does this circuit do that Stan's circuit does[not?]?

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2010, 21:44:45 pm »


The first scope section is across the inductors, which is in the patent at point T1 except different from the inductor to ground (not shown, but you can look), the second is the top and bottom of the resistor to ground, the resistor is actually ringing at the high frequency, and the third is across the resistor which is always unipolar.

$ 1 5.0E-6 0.06872892787909722 50 5.0 50
R 160 192 128 192 0 1 468.1 25.0 0.0 0.0 0.5
d 160 192 208 192 1 0.805904783
l 208 192 256 192 0 0.0017 3.624986987859717
c 256 192 256 240 0 6.8E-5 9.199365704115202
r 304 192 304 240 0 1.0E7
r 304 240 304 288 0 1.0E7
r 256 192 304 192 0 1.0
r 304 192 352 192 0 1.0
r 304 288 256 288 0 1.0
r 304 288 352 288 0 1.0
c 256 240 256 288 0 6.8E-5 9.198365850749484
c 352 192 352 240 0 6.8E-5 5.20734692663194
c 352 288 352 240 0 6.8E-5 -5.20634707326621
R 160 288 128 288 0 1 468.1 25.0 0.0 2.0943951023931953 0.5
r 256 240 304 240 0 1.0
r 304 240 352 240 0 1.0
l 256 288 208 288 0 0.0017 3.624986987859738
w 160 288 208 288 0
r 432 192 432 288 0 10.0
w 432 288 352 288 0
w 432 192 352 192 0
g 256 144 256 128 0
g 256 336 256 352 0
p 256 192 256 144 0
p 256 288 256 336 0
g 480 240 512 240 0
p 432 192 480 240 0
p 432 288 480 240 0
o 2 4 0 299 40.0 6.4 0 -1
o 16 4 0 35 40.0 6.4 0 -1
o 26 4 0 298 80.0 9.765625E-5 1 -1
o 27 4 0 290 80.0 9.765625E-5 1 -1
o 18 4 0 35 40.0 3.2 2 -1
« Last Edit: April 13, 2010, 22:12:34 pm by Donaldwfc »

Offline Hidden

  • Moderator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Re: Hydroxyl
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2010, 01:30:32 am »
Anyone want to guess how this circuit works or what it's doing?